Tag Archives: Throwing

WNBA players were caught throwing punches outside of a club in yet another controversy surrounding the Atlanta Dream


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Why are conservatives throwing a tantrum about anti-racism? The George Floyd protests.


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Man charged with throwing rocks at Asian woman, child in car


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Man accused of throwing fire extinguisher at Capitol police arrested


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4 teenagers face charges after throwing bricks at moving cars in Worcester


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House Republicans appear to be throwing Giuliani, Sondland, and Mulvaney under the bus to save Trump

House Republicans appear to be throwing Giuliani, Sondland, and Mulvaney under the bus to save TrumpHouse Republicans appear to have a new strategy to defend President Trump from mounting evidence that he used the U.S. government to squeeze Ukraine for politically beneficial investigations of Democratic rivals past and present: Talk loudly and throw other Trump allies under the bus. Specifically, The Washington Post reports, Trump's House defenders are effectively offering up U.S. Ambassador Gordon Sondland, Trump attorney Rudy Giuliani, and acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney "to be fall guys" in the Ukraine scandal.All three Trump allies played overlapping roles in the Ukraine story: Sondland informed Ukraine it had to investigate Joe and Hunter Biden to get a White House audience and unfreeze military aid; Trump told his ad hoc Ukraine team to go through Giuliani, who reportedly specified the targets Ukraine needed to investigate and was also behind the ouster of U.S. Ambassador Marie Yovanovich; and Mulvaney was involved in freezing the Ukraine aid and admitted on camera it was tied to Ukraine investigating the Democratic National Committee, a statement he later tried to walk back.House Republicans have now started "sowing doubts about whether Sondland, Giuliani, and Mulvaney were actually representing the president or freelancing to pursue their own agendas," the Post reports. This is just one theory Republicans are testing out — others include that Trump didn't have "corrupt intent," that quid pro quos are commonplace, and that Trump is too incompetent to carry one off. "In a sign of how the GOP is scrambling, however, many of those theories run counter to each other," the Post notes.The blame-the-aides strategy also isn't without risks. Trump's former personal lawyer Michael Cohen flipped after being fed under the bus, and on MSNBC Thursday night, former federal prosecutor Glenn Kirschner speculated to Ari Melber that if Giuliani is charged in either of the two investigations where he's a central figure, "there's nowhere to go but up," and rather than risk prison, "he's gonna sing." More stories from theweek.com The Crown's Olivia Colman had an awkward run-in with Prince William Trump claims 'I don't know' Gordon Sondland. Here's how ridiculous that is. If Trump wins re-election while losing by 5 million votes



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Man, 61, accused of throwing acid on Latino man's face in possible hate crime

Man, 61, accused of throwing acid on Latino man's face in possible hate crimeMahud Villalaz, 42, who is an American citizen, suffered second-degree burns to his face after a man berated him and allegedly threw acid at him.



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Milwaukee man arrested for allegedly throwing acid at 'illegal' US citizen

Milwaukee man arrested for allegedly throwing acid at 'illegal' US citizenVideo shows man asking Mahud Villalaz why he ‘invaded’ the US before tossing acid from a container, causing second-degree burnsMilwaukee official says the incident is being investigated as a hate crime. Photograph: Alamy Stock PhotoMilwaukee police have arrested a suspect who allegedly threw acid at a US citizen after telling him to “go back to [his] country”.Mahud Villalaz suffered second-degree burns to his face after a man threw acid from a container in front of a restaurant on Friday night, in a predominantly Latino part of Milwaukee.Surveillance video showed a hooded man pointing at Villalaz, who was raised in Peru, before throwing the liquid. Villalaz stumbled away from the man, who police said is white.Speaking outside the hospital where he was treated, Villalaz told local news channel WISN 12 the incident began as a parking dispute and escalated when the other man accused him of being “illegal” and asked him why he had “invaded” the US. The man then tossed the acid.“The feeling was burning, and I was trying to defend myself but I couldn’t because I couldn’t open my eyes,” Villalaz said.The president of local advocacy group Forward Latino, Darryl Morin, told the Milwaukee Independent police were investigating the attack as a hate crime.“I don’t see how it could be anything else, as this is sadly and tragically a textbook case of hate,” Morin said. “I dare say it was premeditated, because no one walks around with a bottle of acid and hangs out in a predominantly Latino neighborhood for no reason.”More than $ 16,000 had been raised to help support Villalaz and his family as of Monday morning. In a post on the crowdfunding site GoFundMe, his sister said Villalaz would be unable to do his job as a welder until his burns healed and that he will need follow-up care for damage to his eyesight.“We see acts of hate like this happening everywhere,” his sister, Priscilla Villalaz, wrote. “The only thing we can ask ourselves is why do they hate us so much?”In late 2018, the FBI released data which showed hate crimes in the US rose by 17% in 2017, the third straight annual increase. Many incidents go unreported and not all regions supply hate crime data to the federal agency.Some experts have said there is a link between political rhetoric and hate crimes. The comments Villalaz said his attacker made paralleled rhetoric from Donald Trump, who regularly disparages immigrants and downplays the destructive impact of white nationalism.In July, the president was widely condemned after telling a group of four congresswomen, all US citizens, to “go back” to the countries they came from. Three were born in the US.Since May 2018, Trump’s re-election campaign has run 2,200 ads which mention the word “invasion” while referring to immigrants at the southern border, according to the Associated Press.Milwaukee alderman Jose Perez also said the incident was being investigated as a hate crime, and urged people in the city and the US to be more respectful to each other.“We need those elected officials who are spreading racial hatred to knock off the rhetoric that is designed to divide us,” Perez said in a statement. “Instead, we need to work to heal the wounds that have been gashed open in the last few years. We as a country are better than this.”



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Millions evacuated as Super Typhoon Hagibis slams into Japan – throwing Rugby World Cup into chaos

Millions evacuated as Super Typhoon Hagibis slams into Japan - throwing Rugby World Cup into chaosAt least six million people were told to evacuate their homes as Super Typhoon Hagibis smashed into Japan on Saturday, triggering mudslides, flooding and the heaviest rain and winds in 60 years. Within hours of the typhoon making landfall at around 7pm local time (11am UK), at least two people were dead, nine were missing and more than 80 were injured, according to local media. Officials warned that the storm could be the most powerful to hit Japan since one of the worst typhoons on record devastated Tokyo and surrounding areas in 1958, killing more than 1,200 people. Even before the storm hit, there were reports of at least one death, with a 50-year-old man killed when his car overturned in strong winds in Chiba Prefecture, an area just east of Tokyo still recovering from a strong typhoon which hit last month. Four others, including two children, were also injured by a tornado in the same area. One resident there told NHK: “When the winds suddenly hit, they blew the roof off my house. The noise was awful. One of my three children was injured but is now in a hospital.” Even before the typhoon hit, strong winds brought havoc to areas such as Chiba, near Tokyo  Credit: Katsuya Miyagawa/Kyodo News The typhoon had been brewing over the Pacific Ocean with recorded winds of more than 145 mph. Authorities issued warnings that with gusts likely to exceed that figure, some houses were at risk of being blown down.  The Japan Meteorological Agency warned of as much as 30 inches of rain in the 24-hour period until midnight on Saturday.  Television footage showed images of damage to roofs and walls of buildings in storm-hit spots across Japan. More than 16,000 homes, mainly along the Pacific coastline, were without electricity.  Some residential areas along the coast in Shizuoka were also reported as being submerged up to around knee height in tidal surges. The approaching typhoon caused rivers to overflow in the area, with reports of at least one person swept away, and widespread landslide warnings also in place. Three people were missing in Gunma Prefecture after a landslide swept through six houses. The weather system passed directly over Tokyo, one of seven regions subject to the non-compulsory evacuation orders – and where a 5.7 magnitude earthquake hit just ahead of the typhoon's arrival.  Around 17,000 Self-Defence Forces personnel were on standby across the country for potential deployment on rescue operations. Even as the typhoon moved away from the capital late on Saturday, one expert warned of further flooding as several surrounding prefectures began releasing water from dams, letting it flow downstream. "The situation is now worse than this evening," Nobuyuki Tsuchiya, director of the Japan Riverfront Research Centre, told Reuters. About 1.5 million people in Tokyo live below sea level. Japan's national rugby team waded through floodwater to reach the pitch for practice, with a decision still to be made on Sunday's matches Credit: Japan Rugby Football Union/Reuters A study by the Japan Society of Civil Engineers in June 2018 concluded that a huge storm surge in Tokyo Bay could lead to 8,000 deaths and cause damage estimated at Y115 trillion (£84 billion).  Much of the damage would be to infrastructure, such as underground railway lines, roads and bridges, as well as structures on vulnerable reclaimed land in the bay.  A disaster simulation prepared by the Tokyo Metropolitan Government in 2018 suggested that more than 80 square miles of the city could be inundated in a worst-case scenario, accounting for one-third of the entire city. In low-lying areas, water levels could rise as high as 32 feet above mean sea level.  The government’s estimations are based on data from Typhoon Muroto, which struck the city in September 1934, killing 3,066 people, injuring a further 13,000 and leaving 200,000 people homeless.  Authorities in central Japan called on residents of coastal regions to evacuate to higher ground inland and alerts were sent out to mobile phones through messaging systems and are running on television and radio broadcasts.  Train services in and around Tokyo were cancelled throughout Saturday, along with long-distance bullet train services. Japanese airlines grounded all domestic and international flights out of Narita and Haneda, the two airports that serve the capital, while theme parks and many shops closed their doors. There are fears for low-lying coastal areas, with residents warned they should move to higher ground inland Credit: Kyodo News/AP A number of companies, including car makers Toyota and Honda, have halted production.  Saturday’s Rugby World Cup game between England and France in Yokohama has been cancelled, along with the Italy-New Zealand clash in Toyota City.  A decision is due to be made at midnight on games scheduled for Sunday, including the all-important Scotland-Japan game, which will decide which nation emerges from the group stages of the tournament. The looming super typhoon has also triggered a frenzy of last-minute buying, with store shelves emptied of bread, instant noodles, bottled water and other perishable foods. Stores in some areas have also reportedly run out of batteries and packing tape that is being put across windows to reduce the possibility of flying glass.  Super Typhoon Hagibis – the Tagalog word for “speed” – is the second major storm to hit Japan in just over a month.  Typhoon Faxai struck eastern Japan on September 9, killing three people, leaving more than 40 injured and leaving scenes of devastation in its wake. At the peak of the storm, more than 930,000 people were without power and it took two weeks for some areas to have electricity restored.



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A 6-year-old was arrested for battery after throwing a tantrum in class, grandmother says

A 6-year-old was arrested for battery after throwing a tantrum in class, grandmother saysAn Orlando school resource officer is facing an investigation after he arrested a 6-year-old and an 8-year-old on misdemeanor charges.



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