Tag Archives: Beijing’s

Introducing ‘Hong Kong Silenced’: a new Telegraph podcast documenting Beijing’s crackdown


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Beijing’s ‘Little Blue Men’ spread across South China Sea as Britain sends strike group


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Young Hong Kongers fleeing Beijing’s clampdown left in ‘danger’ as they miss out on British asylum


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US sanctions 24 officials over Beijing’s crackdown on Hong Kong, hours before first face-to-face talks with China


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France sends navy mission to South China Sea as tensions build in Beijing’s back yard


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Hong Kong mass arrests: A stark step in Beijing’s ‘drive for control’


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How Does Ossoff Think about China? A Documentary He Made on Beijing’s Investment in Africa May Hold Clues


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Beijing’s ‘public enemy No. 1′ Jimmy Lai due in court as Hong Kong crackdown continues


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China Student’s Jailing for U.S. Tweets Shows Beijing’s Reach

China Student’s Jailing for U.S. Tweets Shows Beijing’s Reach(Bloomberg) — Sign up for Next China, a weekly email on where the nation stands now and where it's going next.The case of a Chinese student jailed for tweets he sent while studying in America underscores that being overseas is no protection from Beijing’s censors.Luo Daiqing, who attends the University of Minnesota in the U.S., was sentenced to six months in jail by a district court in November for “provocation” after he posted tweets that “defaced the image of the country’s leaders” and had a “negative impact” on society. He was detained in his hometown of Wuhan between July 12 and Jan. 11.A Twitter account linked to Luo posted photos showing government slogans printed over a cartoon villain who looks similar to Chinese President Xi Jinping, according to Axios, which first reported the case Wednesday. The account, which was inaccessible on Thursday, also posted images of Winnie the Pooh, whose likeness is considered sensitive on Chinese social media due to unflattering comparisons to the Communist Party chief.The case is another sign that China is cracking down on government criticism, even outside its borders. While Twitter Inc.’s service is one of many foreign websites banned on the mainland, it’s accessible using virtual private network software that mask a user’s location and Chinese propaganda organizations maintain a robust presence on the platform.The court said Luo had “confessed” to using a false identity for a post that included altered pictures in a bid to attract attention. He later deleted them after realizing they were “improper.” Human rights groups have long accused Chinese authorities of extracting forced confessions as a condition of release, even though local law excludes such evidence from trial.The Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Beijing didn’t immediately respond to a faxed request for comment Thursday.U.S. Senator Ben Sasse, a Nebraska Republican who sits on the Intelligence Committee, criticized the prosecution in a statement.“The Chinese Communist Party has banned Twitter, so the only people who even saw these tweets were the goons charged with monitoring Chinese citizens while they’re enjoying freedom here in the United States,” Sasse said. “This is what ruthless and paranoid totalitarianism looks like.”\–With assistance from Lin Zhu.To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Sharon Chen in Beijing at schen462@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.net, Chris KayFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.



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Hong Kong’s Leader Says She Has Never Asked Beijing’s Permission to Resign

Hong Kong’s Leader Says She Has Never Asked Beijing’s Permission to Resign(Bloomberg) — Hong Kong’s chief executive, Carrie Lam, said she had never asked China for permission to resign over the historic unrest rocking the city, while acknowledging that she discussed her struggles in a closed-door meeting with business leaders.At a news briefing Tuesday in Hong Kong, Lam denounced the leak of audio from the meeting, which was reported late Monday by Reuters, as “unacceptable.” She said was committed to seeing the city through the unrest, and had only attempted to explain that it would be “an easy choice” for anyone to leave under such circumstances.“I have never tendered a resignation to the central people’s government,” Lam told reporters. “I have not even contemplated to discuss a resignation with the central people’s government. The choice of not resigning is my own choice.”The comments follow a fresh wave of pro-democracy protests, including clashes in which demonstrators hurled scores of petrol bombs and police responded with tear gas, water cannons and rubber bullets. The unrest began almost three months ago, when hundreds of thousands of people turned out to oppose Lam’s now-suspended proposal to allow extraditions to mainland China.Lam has so far refused the protesters’ demands, including the formal withdrawal of the legislation, her resignation and an independent inquiry into the unrest. Lam told a closed door meeting of business people last week that she had caused “unforgivable havoc,” and would quit if she had a choice, Reuters reported late Monday, citing an audio tape of her remarks.Lam’s news conference came ahead of a planned briefing from the Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office, China’s top body governing the city, scheduled for Tuesday afternoon. At a previous briefing, the office’s spokesman warned protesters that “Those who play with fire will perish by it.”As protests drag on, Lam — a career bureaucrat appointed to lead the territory by Beijing — has found herself under increasingly intense pressure. Hong Kong’s leader is effectively squeezed between raucous local protesters pushing for greater democratic freedoms and the President Xi Jinping’s one-party government, which is trying to quell the protests while managing a trade war with the U.S.\–With assistance from Venus Feng.To contact the reporter on this story: Iain Marlow in Hong Kong at imarlow1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.net, Daniel Ten KateFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.



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