Tag Archives: Yellow

Here Are All of the 2020 Hyundai Sonata's Available Colors—Including Yellow

Here Are All of the 2020 Hyundai Sonata's Available Colors—Including Yellow



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Yellow vest demonstrators, police clash in Paris

Yellow vest demonstrators, police clash in ParisClashes broke out between dozens of demonstrators and police in Paris on the 23rd Saturday of yellow-vest protests after authorities warned that rioters could return to the French capital to spark a new wave of violence. Dozens of black-hooded demonstrators threw rocks at police and some set fire to scooters and trash cans in the center of the French capital, according to Reuters TV footage. Police responded by firing tear gas and stun grenades.



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Macron's polls rise to highest level since yellow vest revolt as French approve his handling of Notre-Dame fire

Macron's polls rise to highest level since yellow vest revolt as French approve his handling of Notre-Dame fireEmmanuel Macron’s approval ratings have risen to levels not seen since before the “yellow vest” revolt erupted last autumn with most French feeling he “rose to the occasion” over the Notre-Dame fire, a poll out on Friday suggests. President Macron's popularity plummeted last September following a tax rise on pensioners and a backlash over plans to raise fuel taxes. According to BVA, Mr Macron has clawed back three points in the past month and is now on 32 per cent with six out of ten French feeling he did a good job handling the Notre-Dame inferno. Mr Macron had been due to broadcast a key televised address on Monday night to address ”yellow vest” concerns in the wake two months of debates around the country. Leaked details of the speech suggest he was going to announce tax cuts for poor households and a boost to small pensions, among other measures. Instead, he rushed to the famed Gothic building in central Paris and later promised to rebuild the cathedral within five years.  A poll out yesterday suggested most of the measures Mr Macron was due to announce “answered” yellow vest demands, although the vast majority were angry at his refusal to instantly reinstate a wealth tax. Mr Macron is expected to detail the measures in person next week. The poll also found that 54 per cent of French think “yellow vest” protests should be put on hold in the name of national unity over Notre-Dame. Due to the fragility of the building and the risk of violence, police are to impose a protest ban on the area around the fire-stricken for Saturday's 23rd consecutive “gilets jaunes” protest. Despite this, police fear fresh protests in the French capital on Saturday with the interior minister warning “some people literally want to trash Paris”. A number of high-profile gilets jaunes figures have called for action with some outraged that almost €1billion (£865 million) was donated to rebuilding Notre-Dame while there was no such gesture for the poor. Yesterday the last artworks inside the cathedral were removed with art conservationists confirming none suffered major damage in the fire. In more good news, the 180,000 bees kept in hives on the monument that were thought to have perished in this week's fire were discovered alive.



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French violence flares as yellow vest protests enter fourth month

French violence flares as yellow vest protests enter fourth monthRioters set fire to a bank and ransacked stores on Paris’s Champs Elysees avenue on Saturday, in a new flare-up of violence as France’s yellow vest protests against President Emmanuel Macron and his pro-business reforms entered a fourth month. Police fired tear gas and water cannon as the protests turned violent after weeks of relative calm, during which marches had attracted declining numbers of participants. Rioters also set fire to an upmarket handbag store and two newsstands on the Champs Elysees, while scattered bonfires burned on the thoroughfare.



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Unrest returns to Paris with worst yellow vest violence in weeks

Unrest returns to Paris with worst yellow vest violence in weeksAnti-government protesters hurled rocks and paving slabs at police, looted boutiques, smashed up a luxury restaurant on Paris’s famed Champs-Elysées and set a bank on fire on Saturday. A mother and her baby trapped on the second floor of the building, as flames surged up from the bank branch on the ground floor, were rescued by firefighters. The bank offices were gutted and 11 people were slightly injured, including two police officers. Smoke and tear gas shrouded the Champs-Elysées and at least 109 people were arrested in the worst outbreak of violence on the fringes of a “yellow vest” demonstration in Paris for several weeks. President Emmanuel Macron has cut short his skiing holiday to return to Paris to chair an emergency meeting over what the authorities are describing as "intolerable violence and damage".   Christophe Castaner, the interior minister, tweeted that those who set the bank on fire “are neither demonstrators nor troublemakers: they are killers.”  Grinning “yellow vest” protesters posed for photographs in front of the shattered facade of Le Fouquet’s, a restaurant that earned Nicolas Sarkozy the nickname of “President Bling-bling” when he celebrated his 2007 election victory there.  A Yellow Vest protester gestures in front of a newsagent set alight during clashes with riot police Credit:  ZAKARIA ABDELKAFI/ AFP A Yellow Vest protester destroys a shop window during clashes with riot police forces on the Champs-Elysees Credit: AFP Much of the violence on the 18th consecutive Saturday of protests against President Macron’s economic reforms was blamed on anarchists, far-Right and ultra-leftist agitators rather than the “yellow vests” themselves.  Police estimated the number of demonstrators at about 32,000 across France. About 5,000 police officers were deployed in Paris alone. The numbers of protesters have dwindled since the “yellow vest” movement began in November, amid growing anger over income inequality and a lack of public services in rural areas and small towns.  Fouquet’s was the favoured status restaurant of Nicolas Sarkozy. Was. GiletsJaunespic.twitter.com/LUXGoKy7yW— Peter Allen (@peterallenparis) March 16, 2019 More took to the streets on Saturday compared with recent weeks, following social media calls for a strong turnout to mark the four-month anniversary of the movement’s launch. President Macron wrapped up a “great debate” consultation exercise on Friday to allow people to vent their grievances, which has helped him to regain some of the popularity lost since his election. Some “yellow vests” have dismissed the exercise as a campaign ploy ahead of European elections in May. The Yellow Vest protests About 30,000 people took part in a separate, peaceful demonstration to demand urgent government action to combat climate change



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Yellow vest 'ultimatum' rally turns violent in Paris

Yellow vest 'ultimatum' rally turns violent in ParisAfter weeks of declining participation, France’s “yellow vest” protest movement attempted to rebound on Saturday with a major rally in Paris which quickly turned violent. A large crowd gathered on the Champs-Elysees avenue for the 18th straight week of anti-government protests which initially rocked President Emmanuel Macron’s administration, forcing him to adopt more anti-poverty measures, but had appeared to fizzle in recent weeks. Police fired tear gas to disperse protesters who erected barricades near the Champs-Elysees in scenes reminiscent of some of the most tense “yellow vest” rallies.



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'It's the apocalypse': Paris rioters run amok at yellow vest rallies

'It's the apocalypse': Paris rioters run amok at yellow vest ralliesThe Champs-Elysees avenue in Paris was a sea of black and yellow on Saturday as black-clad anarchists used a “yellow vest” rally to run amok, looting shops and torching businesses in scenes reminiscent of the riots that shook the city late last year. The demonstrator was referring to December 1, when protesters went on the rampage in Paris, smearing the Arc de Triomphe war memorial in graffiti in a frenzy of vandalism, looting and arson. The violence prompted President Emmanuel Macron’s government to rescind planned fuel tax hikes and announce billions in measures to assist the working poor.



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‘Yellow Jacket’ protests paralyze Paris and threaten Macron’s government

‘Yellow Jacket’ protests paralyze Paris and threaten Macron’s governmentThe fourth weekend of violent protests in France paralyzed the capital, as demonstrators called for the resignation of President Emmanuel Macron.



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Yellow vests protests are 'a catastrophe for our economy' warns French finance minister

Yellow vests protests are 'a catastrophe for our economy' warns French finance ministerThe French finance minister warned that France’s worst street protests in decades were “an economic disaster” as burned out cars and debris were cleared from the streets of Paris and other cities on Sunday. “It’s a catastrophe for trade. It’s a catastrophe for our economy,” said Bruno Le Maire, a conservative serving under Emmanuel Macron, the embattled centrist president who came to power last year promising to modernise France with sweeping pro-business reforms. Mr Le Maire promised that the state and insurance companies would foot the repair bill. Tax payments due at the end of the year will be postponed for retailers whose shops were ransacked only two weeks before Christmas, he said. Dozens of cars were torched in Paris on Saturday as protesters roared “Macron resign”. Clashes also broke out in Marseille, Bordeaux, Lyon and Toulouse during the fourth consecutive weekend of protests. Tourism has suffered a blow, with Paris hotel bookings over Christmas and New Year, normally a busy period, down by at least 20 per cent.  Yellow vest protesters clash with police in Paris, in pictures Emmanuel Grégoire, deputy mayor of Paris, said the damage to property was worse than in the previous weekend’s riots. “The protests spread over a much larger area, so many more places were hit,” he said.  But there was less violence thanks to an increase in police numbers and more efficient tactics. Officers swiftly detained hooligans, arresting more than 1,700, a record for a single day in post-war France. Jean-Yves Le Drian, the foreign minister, rebuked Donald Trump for a provocative tweet in which he appeared to back the protesters and claimed they were chanting his name on the streets of Paris. Telegraph reporters, placed across the city, heard no such chants. “We do not take part in domestic American politics and we want that to be reciprocated,” Mr Le Drian said.  Thousands of protesters continued blockading petrol stations and barricaded roads across the country on Sunday. Thomas Lebrun, a 62-year-old pensioner demonstrating near Vierzon, in central France, said: “We won’t stop until our demands are met. We want action not words.” The increasingly unpopular president is expected to make a televised address to the nation on Monday or Tuesday. Under fire for remaining silent for the past week, Mr Macron’s approval ratings have plunged to record lows of below 20 per cent. With critics accusing him of being arrogant and remote, he faces an enormous challenge in trying to win back public support amid the most serious unrest since students and workers rioted in May 1968.  He has already scrapped increases in “green” taxes on fuel, but the protesters want further concessions such as tax cuts for people on low incomes and tax increases for businesses.  Such measures would mark a humiliating U-turn for the president, who has been trying to attract foreign investors and entice banks and finance companies to relocate from London to Paris by offering tax breaks. Benjamin Griveaux, the government spokesman, warned: “All the problems of the ‘yellow vests’ can’t be settled by waving a magic wand.” But he added that Mr Macron would make “important announcements”. According to French media, he may raise the minimum wage and pensions, and  introduce a tax-free bonus for workers on low incomes.   The “yellow-vest” movement, which takes its name from the high-visibility jackets worn by demonstrators, began as a  protest against fuel tax increases four weeks ago. It has since widened to encompass a range of demands such as 40-per-cent increases in the minimum wage and benefits, and the re-introduction of a wealth tax on high earners, scrapped by Mr Macron as part of a drive to promote investment. French intelligence is investigating claims that the movement, which began on social media, spread with the help of Russian trolls. Hundreds of social media accounts linked to Russia allegedly played a role in spreading disinformation, but officials said no evidence of Russian state involvement had been uncovered so far.



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Jacline Mouraud: Founder of Yellow Vest movement denounces extremists hijacking her tax protest

Jacline Mouraud: Founder of Yellow Vest movement denounces extremists hijacking her tax protestThe founder of the “yellow vest” revolt said it had become a dangerous “dog without a leash” prey to extremists and anarchists, and urged moderate protesters to open dialogue with the French government. Jacline Mouraud, a 51-year old composer and hypnotherapist from Brittany, is credited with sparking the movement after six million people viewed her Facebook diatribe against environmental duties on petrol and diesel last month. “What are you doing with the money apart from buying new dishes at the Élysée Palace and building yourself swimming pools?” she asked President Emmanuel Macron in her viral video. But she said the movement had now been hijacked by an increasingly violent fringe of “extremists and anarchists”. Speaking to The Sunday Telegraph, Ms Mouraud, said: “This movement has broken free of everyone, you can’t reason with people any more. Some don’t even remember what demands we made at the start. “It’s as if we had kept the dog on a leash and today the leash has snapped.” A firefighter stands next to a car set on fire during a protest of Yellow vest  Credit: ALAIN JOCARD/AFP/Getty Images Before the violence of the past two weeks, she said the revolt was a “spontaneous movement of the people” that could not be manipulated. Now, however, it was, she said, not just “beyond the reach of the government, political parties, unions” but “the people from the movement themselves”. She added: “We’re witnessing a tsunami. The wave is still in the air and we’ll just have to wait for it to crash down again.” Facebook, she said, had initially “helped bring people together and get organised”. But it also now had a “very negative side,” she added. Experts said that Facebook’s decentralised nature is ideal for "gilets jaunes”, particularly as it changed its algorithms earlier this year to lower the visibility of content published on pages run by large media outlets. "It prioritised content being shared by groups, individual profiles, and local information. This change in the algorithm has boosted the emergence of this movement," Tristan Mendes France, who teaches digital culture at Paris-Diderot University, said. Hundreds of social media accounts linked to Russia have sought to amplify the street protests that have rocked France, according to analysis by New Knowledge, a cybersecurity company. Facebook's new algorithm for ordering the posts that users see has also given raised the profile of extremists, conspiracy theorists and proponents of fake news. Ms Mouraud and other “spokespeople” have received death threats. Those behind them “don’t want a resolution of the conflict”, she said.  A protestor wearing a "yellow vest" (Gilet jaune) throws a cobble at police forces Credit: THOMAS SAMSON/AFP/Getty Images She was among a “yellow vest” delegation that met the prime minister, Edouard Philippe, on Friday night. They listed demands ranging from tax justice and proportional representative in legislative elections and raising low pensions. The prime minister has called for three months of talks between the gilets jaunes and local and national officials. She added: “Today, I have no idea how this will pan out. What’s for sure is if we don’t get organised, it will have no future. We’ll have done all that for nothing.”



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