Tag Archives: What&#39s

When it comes to mass shootings, the panic is what's fueling the crisis.

When it comes to mass shootings, the panic is what's fueling the crisis.It's time for us to get responsible in the way we cover mass shootings and the way we discuss them as a society.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

What's Behind Socialism's New Appeal Among Americans?

What's Behind Socialism's New Appeal Among Americans?Multiple forms of socialism, from hard Stalinism to European redistribution, continue to fail.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Democrats won Virginia and are claiming victory in Kentucky. What's next?

Democrats won Virginia and are claiming victory in Kentucky. What's next?The latest contests point the Democrats to a path forward. Whether that road actually leads to the White House remains to be seen‘On Tuesday, impeachment wasn’t the vote magnet the president’s minions swore that it would be.’ Photograph: Steve Helber/APOn election day 2019, the Democrats swept the Virginia legislature, and appear to have won the Kentucky governor’s mansion. Trends visible when Nancy Pelosi reclaimed the House speaker’s gavel a year ago remain ever present.America’s suburbs continues to abandon their traditional political home even as rural voters remain energized by an unpopular president. On Tuesday, impeachment wasn’t the vote magnet the president’s minions swore that it would be.In Kentucky, Democrat Andy Beshear, the state’s attorney general, appears to have ousted Matt Bevin, the incumbent Republican who has refused to concede defeat. Less than half a percent separates the two candidates. Trump had triumphed in the Bluegrass State by 30 points. If not gone, his magic is not readily transferable.For the record, Beshear won the very suburban counties that had gone for Bevin four years earlier. Meanwhile, voters in Kentucky’s urban precincts flocked to the polls for the Democrat. Jefferson County, home to Louisville, voted Democratic by better than two-to-one.On the Monday night immediately before the election, Trump had headlined a Maga rally for Bevin and was joined onstage by Kentucky’s senators Mitch McConnell and Rand Paul. There, Trump proclaimed: “If you lose, they are going to say Trump suffered the greatest defeat in the history of the world. You can’t let that happen to me!” At the same gathering, Paul had urged the press corps to out the whistleblower who is the bane of Trump’s existence, a reminder of libertarianism’s neo-Confederate strains.Hours later, on Tuesday morning, Trump then tweeted that the “impeachment hoax had fired up voters in Kentucky”. Maybe so, but not exactly the way Trump had thought.Instead, Trump’s presence comes with a downside: it energizes his opposition. As to be expected, Donald Trump Jr told Fox News’ viewers as the results rolled in, “This has nothing to do with Trump.”To be sure, Trump and Bevin may have also been hurt by the headlines that emerged as Kentuckians went to the polls. Gordon Sondland, Trump’s ambassador to the European Union, had corrected his impeachment testimony and admitted that there had been a quid pro quo involving Ukraine and Hunter Biden.Republican demands that the Democrats release transcripts have given way to Republicans announcing that they now have no intention of reading said transcripts. Ignorance is the new bliss.Meanwhile, McConnell who doubles as Senate majority leader, was signaling that while he thought the Senate would acquit Trump in an impeachment trial, bipartisan agreement would be needed for the trial to proceed. “This is not something the majority can micromanage like it can on almost any other issue,” said McConnell.In Virginia, the Republicans fate was gloomier as they lost the state senate and the house of delegates. For the first time since 1992, the Democrats hold control of both legislative chambers. Adding insult to injury, Juli Briskman, the cyclist who flipped-off the presidential motorcade two years earlier, won her bid for local office in Virginia’s Loudon County.Looking back, the Republicans’ defeat in the 2017 gubernatorial race was a harbinger of what actually came next. Suburban Virginians again made themselves heard and stuck a thumb in the president’s eye. Against this backdrop, Elaine Luria and Abigail Spanberger, freshman congresswomen from swing districts in Virginia must be breathing more easily.The two had publicly announced their support for the House’s impeachment inquiry in a Washington Post op-ed along with five other freshman with national security credentials. They also served as catalysts for Democrats moving forward on the topic.Spanberger is a former CIA operative while Luria is an ex-navy commander. Together, they are a reminder that the House Democrats are not just about Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and the party’s left wing, and that Democrats have found traction outside the New York and California’s big cities.While Democrats have reason to smile, perspective remains essential. While Tuesday’s results can be spun as a defeat for Trumpism, Kentucky is not a swing state and Bevin was an unpopular governor. A year from now, it will appear in the president’s column regardless of the national results. The last time Kentucky voted Democratic was in 1996 for Bill Clinton and Ross Perot was on the ballot.Next, Beshear ran as a moderate, something that cannot be said of Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren. The former is a self-described democratic-socialist and the latter wants to remake capitalism in her own image. By the numbers, Warren appears poised to lose to Trump as suburban voters are turned-off by her plans for redistributive economics.In that sense, the latest contests point the Democrats to a path forward. Whether that road actually leads to the White House remains to be seen.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

What's the dispute between Hillary Clinton and Tulsi Gabbard about?

What's the dispute between Hillary Clinton and Tulsi Gabbard about?Much of the controversy is actually based on a misquote of Hillary Clinton's remarks about Rep. Tulsi Gabbard on a podcast.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

What's causing record rates of STDs?

What's causing record rates of STDs?After decades of decline, rates of certain STDs have spiked to record levels, according to the CDC. What’s causing the increase?



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Hurricane Dorian: What's the forecast for Florida vacation spots?

Hurricane Dorian: What's the forecast for Florida vacation spots?What the forecast is saying about the impact Hurricane Dorian will have on a number of popular vacation spots.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Here's What's Missing From the Health-Care Debate

Here's What's Missing From the Health-Care Debate(Bloomberg Opinion) — Health care took up a decent portion of the Democratic presidential debates this week. For all of the verbiage, we didn’t learn much new. Everybody wants universal coverage, but they have different ideas about how to get there. One group, led Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, want a single-payer system like “Medicare for All”; others, including former Vice President Joe Biden, prefer various flavors of a public option that co-exists with elements of the status quo.Nonetheless, there were a few moments that drew attention to important issues that could (or should) shape the health-care discussion going forward: THE BIG TRADE-OFF: “People who have health under Medicare for All will have no premiums, no deductibles, no co-payments, no out-of-pocket expenses,” Sanders said during Wednesday's debate. “Yes, they will pay more in taxes, but less in health care for what they get.” Sanders was responding to a question about whether his policies would mean higher taxes for middle-class Americans; his answer elucidated an essential truth that’s still lost on many voters. Medicare for All is at its core a shift in how America finances health care. Right now, people pay big chunks of their health costs themselves – especially when they’re sick. Sanders’s plan would replace that out-of-pocket spending with taxes. There’s an appeal to that. It’s more equitable and would eliminate situations where health crises result in bankruptcy, or costs dissuades people from seeking care. Whether this shift will result in savings for individuals will depend on tax details as well as income and health status. If such a plan can lower costs by cutting prices and eliminating insurer profits, there’s a real possibility that many Americans come out ahead. Right now, polls suggest that broad support for Medicare for All drops when people hear about tax increases. Getting voters to understand what they get in return will be critical. RAISE YOUR HAND: On both nights, the debate moderators chose to boil the health-care debate down to one yes-or-no question. Candidates who support eliminating private health insurance in favor of a single-payer system were asked to raise their hands. This is a defining divide in the field, so it was notable that Elizabeth Warren raised hers on Wednesday. She places third in most polls behind Joe Biden and Sanders, and has been vague on health care in the past. If she’s a dogmatic supporter of Sanders’s specific plan, that tilts the race in the direction of Medicare for All. I’m not sure that’s the case, though. She could end up diverging on specifics of how the U.S. should transition to a single-payer system and structure it. As the field shrinks, it will probably benefit her to stake out a place between Sanders and Biden, who supports a milder public option. A lot of candidates want to be in that space, though none have defined it well or made it their own yet. Given ambivalent polling about the details of Medicare for All and the idea of killing private insurance, this feels like an opportunity for the person who seizes it. WHAT PRICE IS RIGHT?  America spends far more than other countries on services without getting better results. That might not change without price controls for providers. Former Maryland representative John Delaney claimed on Wednesday that these types of controls would have consequences, saying that many hospitals would be forced to close if they had to accept the rates currently paid by Medicare for all services. While the truth of that statement is a matter of some debate, what isn’t in doubt is that lower reimbursement would be necessary even for milder plans, and that this could put pressure on hospital systems. Reform-minded candidates don’t like to talk about that, which is why Delaney’s point stood out. Instead, they preferred to focus their ire on insurers and drugmakers. Drug prices and insurer overhead are important issues too, but services eat up a far more significant portion of spending. The field won’t be able to ignore that issue and the potentially disruptive consequences of dealing with it. These first debates got the discussion going. The devil will be in the details.To contact the author of this story: Max Nisen at mnisen@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Max Nisen is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering biotech, pharma and health care. He previously wrote about management and corporate strategy for Quartz and Business Insider.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

What's an advanced Russian warship doing in Havana harbor?

What's an advanced Russian warship doing in Havana harbor?One of the Russian navy’s most advanced warships entered Havana’s harbor Monday and docked at the port used until this month by U.S. cruise lines. Here are some questions and answers about the Admiral Gorshkov’s travels through the Caribbean. WHAT IS THE ADMIRAL GORSHKOV?



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

AP Explains: What's next in Venezuela's political stand-off?

AP Explains: What's next in Venezuela's political stand-off?CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) — A previously little-known Venezuelan congressman, Juan Guaidó, leaped to the front stage of Venezuela's political conflict early this year by declaring himself interim president in a bid to force the removal of President Nicolas Maduro.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Q&A: What's at stake as India-Pakistan tensions rise?

Q&A: What's at stake as India-Pakistan tensions rise?ISLAMABAD (AP) — Nuclear-armed rivals India and Pakistan face their worst tension in years over the disputed region of Kashmir, with Islamabad saying they shot down two Indian warplanes Wednesday and captured a pilot. Pakistan, which previously said it captured two pilots, immediately shut down its civilian airspace in response.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines