Tag Archives: Walk

'#ThanksObama': 2020 Democrats walk back Obama criticisms

'#ThanksObama': 2020 Democrats walk back Obama criticismsSeveral 2020 Democrats took aim at former President Barack Obama during the primary debates this week but seemed to have a change of heart in the days since.



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Trump Can’t Just Walk Away From ‘Send Her Back’

Trump Can’t Just Walk Away From ‘Send Her Back’(Bloomberg Opinion) — Last Sunday, President Donald Trump suggested that four Democratic congresswomen of color, three of whom were born in the U.S., “go back” to their ancestors’ countries. Despite a broad public outcry about the leader of the free world unleashing a timeworn racist trope, Trump refused to apologize or back away from his comments.On Tuesday, the House of Representatives voted to condemn Trump for “racist comments that have legitimized and increased fear and hatred of new Americans and people of color.” The president stood his ground. A day later, he presided over an unsettling and ominous political rally in North Carolina during which the crowd started chanting “send her back” after he singled out Representative Ilhan Omar, a Democrat and a Somali immigrant, as unpatriotic.Public pressure finally forced Trump into a lukewarm retreat by Thursday. “I was not happy with it; I disagreed with it,” he said of the chants he had incited, claiming he attempted to stop them by “speaking very quickly." (This isn’t true. Trump didn’t speak at all while the chants were occurring.)Trump’s defenders have blamed the media and his political opponents for the backlash, and the president himself tweeted this week that “I don’t have a Racist bone in my body!” If Trump’s racism isn’t in his bones, then it’s likely to be found in his heart because he’s been awash in it for decades.Consider:\– Trump and his father, Fred, ran a housing business that the Justice Department censured in 1973 for discriminating against prospective tenants of color.\– Trump bought newspaper ads in 1989 that condemned black and Latino teenagers accused of assaulting a white jogger in Central Park, stoking racial acrimony to snare media attention. (He continued to insist on the teenagers’ guilt long after they were exonerated.)\– Jack O’Donnell, a senior executive at Trump’s Atlantic City casinos during the late 1980s, described Trump as someone whose “prejudices didn’t stop at the color of one’s skin. Everyone was subject to judgment. It could be their ethnicity, their gender, their religion. It could be their social ‘caste.’”\– O’Donnell also described Trump as picky about who handled his cash back then. “Black guys counting my money! I hate it. The only kind of people I want counting my money are short guys that wear yarmulkes every day.”\– When he was running his casino business, Trump paid for a series of newspaper and broadcast ads that sought to brand a potential competitor seeking a gambling license — a Native American tribe, the Mohawks — as drug dealers and criminals.\– Trump’s first wife, Ivana, told her lawyer during their divorce that Trump kept a copy of Hitler’s collected speeches by his bedside in Trump Tower. When a reporter questioned Trump about the book in 1990, he balked and then said it was a gift.\– Trump embraced birtherism in 2011 and falsely asserted that President Barack Obama was born overseas and had forged his birth certificate.\– While the Trump University lawsuit was being litigated, Trump publicly claimed one of the judges hearing the case, Gonzalo Curiel, was biased because of his Mexican heritage. Curiel was born in the U.S.\– Trump has often been reluctant to distance himself from white supremacists like the former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke.\– Trump gave Steve Bannon, who has been associated with white nationalism, a senior role in his 2016 presidential campaign and in his White House.\– Trump has unapologetically retweeted white nationalists, and for years has praised himself and others as being the successful beneficiaries of “good genes.”\– Michael Cohen, Trump’s former lawyer, testified before Congress earlier this year that “Mr. Trump is a racist.” He also recalled a trip with Trump: “While we were once driving through a struggling neighborhood in Chicago, he commented that only black people could live that way. He told me that black people would never vote for him because they were too stupid.”\– In White House meetings, Trump has inveighed against allowing immigrants from “shithole countries” into the U.S. — noting that, unlike residents of Norway, Haitians all had AIDS and Nigerians lived in “huts.”\– In the wake of the Charlottesville marches in 2017, Trump famously couldn’t bring himself to condemn the neo-Nazis who had taken part. Instead, he criticized the “egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence, on many sides — on many sides.”All this preceded the events of this week and there’s no reason to believe that the president is chastened. Someone who was authentically compassionate and not a racist would be horrified to be accused of racism; an apology would’ve been prompt. Yet Trump bridled and has yet to apologize to anyone. He doesn’t care; this is who he is.The North Carolina rally is a just a taste of how craven the president is prepared to be to retake the White House. And the path he’s on will test the country’s morality, decency and ideals.(Updates 15th paragraph to more accurately reflect Steve Bannon’s past associations.)To contact the author of this story: Timothy L. O'Brien at tobrien46@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Timothy Lavin at tlavin1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Timothy L. O’Brien is the executive editor of Bloomberg Opinion. He has been an editor and writer for the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, HuffPost and Talk magazine. His books include “TrumpNation: The Art of Being The Donald.”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.



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Nuclear War with North Korea Is Still Possible. Trump’s ‘Walk’ Across the DMZ Made That Less Likely.

Nuclear War with North Korea Is Still Possible. Trump’s ‘Walk’ Across the DMZ Made That Less Likely.Donald Trump did the seemingly impossible by being the first sitting U.S. President to set foot in North Korea. On Sunday, Trump met with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un at the Korean demilitarized zone (DMZ), where they held an hour-long summit. They also briefly stepped over the border together into North Korea and back again, replicating the same historic act previously carried out by South Korean President Moon Jae-in and Kim. While many of Trump’s critiques called it nothing more than a photo-op, this symbolic act brought down tensions as Washington and Pyongyang promised to resume negotiations.How can anyone not applaud when two nations who have technically been in a formal state of armed conflict for nearly seven decades seek dialogue? At least for the moment, it seems the Trump Administration has made escalation management America’s primary goal, ensuring any pause in talks does not slip back to the dark days of 2017. The alternative runs the risk of an unwanted war.



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Vietnamese defendant in Kim Jong Nam trial may walk free next month after plea deal

Vietnamese defendant in Kim Jong Nam trial may walk free next month after plea dealA Vietnamese woman accused of assassinating Kim Jong-un’s half-brother pled guilty to a lesser charge on Monday and may now be freed in early May.  Doan Thi Huong, 29, had been facing the death penalty after being charged with the murder of Kim Jong Nam, 45, who died in February 2017 after the Vietnamese woman and an accomplice allegedly smeared toxic VX agent on his face at Kuala Lumpur airport.  Her high-profile trial in a Malaysian court ended abruptly on Monday after prosecutors offered to reduce the murder charge to a lesser one of “causing hurt by a dangerous weapon.” Ms Doan accepted the plea deal and was sentenced to just over three years in prison, with the jail term backdated to her arrest in 2017.  “It is my view that the length of imprisonment would serve the interest of justice,” said Judge Azmi Ariffin, as he announced the verdict. He told Ms Doan that she was “very very lucky” and he wished her “all the best.” The defendant stood up in the dock and thanked the judge, prosecutors and the Malaysian and Vietnamese governments.  As she left the courtroom, she told reporters she was happy and hoped to be a singer and actress when she returned to Vietnam.  Kim Jong Nam was murdered at Kuala Lumpur's international airport in 2017 Credit: Shizuo Kambayashi/AP Hisyam Teh Poh Teik, her lawyer, said she was expected to be freed by the first week of May, after a one third reduction in her sentence for good behaviour.  Ms Doan had been the sole remaining suspect on trial for the painful, public death of Kim whose body seized up and organs shut down within minutes of inhaling the VX agent in the departures hall of the busy international airport.  Siti Aisyah, an alleged Indonesian accomplice, was released last month without charge after high level lobbying from her government.  Vietnam also publicly appealed to the Malaysian authorities for the fair treatment and acquittal of Ms Doan who her lawyers said had been left “traumatised” that she had been left to face charges alone.  The two women, from impoverished backgrounds and with aspirations in showbusiness, claimed that they had been duped into believing they were actors in a reality TV prank show and had no intention to murder Kim.  Their legal teams argued that the women had been cynically used as pawns in an audacious Cold War-style assassination of a potential future challenger to Kim Jong-un, who maintains an iron grip on power in reclusive North Korea.  Four North Korean suspects in the murder remain at large, although Pyongyang has always denied any state involvement in the crime.  Le Quy Qunyh, the Vietnamese ambassador to Malaysia, said he was “very happy” that Ms Doan had been released and thanked the Vietnamese and Malaysian governments.  “But I have to say that Doan Thi Huong is a victim in this case, like the Indonesian citizen, Siti Aisyah,” he added.



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PHOTOS: In Gaza, women walk thin line between hope and despair

PHOTOS: In Gaza, women walk thin line between hope and despairThose restrictions have devastated Gaza’s economy and left many of its women, like Rudwan’s younger sister, struggling to find work after graduating from college.



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Wide-Area Walk Mowers: When You Have More Lawn Than a Simple Push Mower Can Handle

Wide-Area Walk Mowers: When You Have More Lawn Than a Simple Push Mower Can Handle



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Trump Was Right to Walk Away From Kim

Trump Was Right to Walk Away From KimOn Thursday afternoon, President Donald Trump cut short his summit in Hanoi with North Korea’s Kim Jong Un. “Sometimes you have to walk,” Trump explained later at a press conference. Trump said Kim demanded a full lifting of sanctions in exchange for only partial denuclearization.



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Trump Leaves Summit Early After Clashing With Kim Over Sanctions: ‘Sometimes You Have to Walk’

Trump Leaves Summit Early After Clashing With Kim Over Sanctions: ‘Sometimes You Have to Walk’President Trump and Kim Jong-un prematurely concluded their summit in Vietnam on Thursday after reaching an impasse related to the lifting of existing international sanctions against North Korea.“Sometimes you have to walk,” Trump said during a press conference in Hanoi Thursday afternoon.Trump went on to explain that negotiations collapsed after Kim demanded that all international sanctions be lifted immediately in exchange for the closure of one major North Korean nuclear facility, but not an end to the nuclear program in its entirety.“It was about the sanctions,” Trump explained. “Basically they wanted the sanctions lifted in their entirety, but we couldn’t do that.”Negotiations have remained stalled since the last time the two leaders met in Singapore in June 2018 for a summit that produced a communique rife with vague commitments, but lacking in timelines and specific, verifiable action items. The U.S. continues to demand the complete shutdown of North Korea's nuclear facilities as well as it its warhead and missile programs, while Kim continues to demand the U.S. act first by working to lift U.S. and U.N. sanctions.Though Trump failed to secure additional commitments from Kim, he said Thursday that Kim agreed to continue the moratorium he imposed last year on nuclear and ballistic missile testing, and emphasized that the two remain friendly.“This wasn’t a walkaway like you get up and walk out,” he said. “No, this was very friendly. We shook hands.”“There’s a warmth that we have and I hope that stays,” he added.South Korean president Moon Jae-in, who has been working aggressively in the last year to improve relations with his neighbor to the north, praised the two leaders for their attempt at negotiations.“It is regrettable that they could not reach a complete agreement,” Kim Eui-kyeom, a spokesman for Mr. Moon, said Thursday. “But it also seems clear that both sides have made more significant progress than ever.”



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GM won't budge on closing Oshawa, as workers protest and walk off the job

GM won't budge on closing Oshawa, as workers protest and walk off the jobSays Unifor boss after meeting company leaders: 'I'm furious right now.'



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Zimbabwe's Robert Mugabe unable to walk, seeking treatment in Singapore

Zimbabwe's Robert Mugabe unable to walk, seeking treatment in SingaporeFormer Zimbabwean leader Robert Mugabe has been receiving medical treatment in Singapore for the last two months and is no longer able to walk, though he should return home next week, President Emmerson Mnangagwa said on Saturday. Mr Mugabe, 94, who ruled the southern African nation for nearly four decades since independence from Britain in 1980, was forced to resign in November 2017 after an army coup. Mr Mnangagwa told ruling ZANU-PF supporters at a rally in Murombedzi, Mr Mugabe’s village some 100 km (60 miles) west of the capital Harare, his predecessor had been due to return on October 15 but that his poor health had delayed the journey. He did not say what treatment Mr Mugabe had been undergoing. “We have just received a message that he is better now and will return on November 30. "He can no longer walk but we will continue taking care of him,” Mr Mnangagwa said, referring to Mr Mugabe by his totem name Gushungo. Zimbabwe's President Emmerson Mnangagwa delivers a speech during a "Thank You" rally on November 24, 2018 Credit:  JEKESAI NJIKIZANA/AFP During his later years in power, Mr Mugabe made several medical trips to Singapore. Officials often said he was being treated for a cataract,denying frequent reports by private local media that he had prostate cancer. Mr Mnangagwa, who won a disputed July 30 presidential vote, repeated the army’s previous justification for last year’s coup, saying his former mentor Mr Mugabe had been surrounded by criminals. When the army rolled its tanks into Harare, military leaders said they were targeting “criminals around the president.” A bitter Mr Mugabe said later, however, that the army’s action had forced him to resign.



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