Tag Archives: violence

Violence in Greece breaks out after annual US Embassy march

Violence in Greece breaks out after annual US Embassy marchATHENS, Greece (AP) — Hundreds of youths attacked police in Greece's two largest cities on Friday, hurling rocks, flares and gas bombs, following a large, peaceful march to mark the anniversary of the 1973 crackdown on a student uprising against Greece's former military dictatorship.



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Take Our Quiz On Gun Violence In America

Take Our Quiz On Gun Violence In AmericaPublished in partnership with The Trace, a nonprofit, investigative newsroom covering gun violence in America.



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America's Mass Shooting Problem Is A Domestic Violence Problem

America's Mass Shooting Problem Is A Domestic Violence ProblemIt seems like there is no place in America that is immune to a mass shooting.



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Kenya opposition leader calls for calm in slum hit by deadly violence

Kenya opposition leader calls for calm in slum hit by deadly violenceBy George Obulutsa and Duncan Miriri NAIROBI (Reuters) – Kenyan opposition leader Raila Odinga called for calm on Sunday as he visited a slum in the capital that was hit by violence when a political stand-off over a repeat presidential election fed into rising ethnic tensions. Clashes in Kawangware and in a village in western Kenya following Thursday’s vote were the first signs that face-offs between Odinga supporters and the police might eventually morph into neighbors turning against each other. Standing here in this church we want to condemn the militarization of politics in this country,” Odinga told residents in the Nairobi slum.



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Once again, Kenya delays election in some areas over risk of violence

Once again, Kenya delays election in some areas over risk of violenceBy Ed Cropley and George Obulutsa NAIROBI (Reuters) – Kenyan authorities said on Friday they would indefinitely delay further attempts to hold a repeat presidential election in some areas due to the risk of violence, as the opposition rejected the re-run as “a sham” and said the polls should be canceled. The east African nation had been due to hold elections on Saturday in four western counties, after residents blocked roads and clashed with police on during an attempt to hold the polls there on Thursday. Opposition leader Raila Odinga pulled out of the contest earlier this month, saying the contest against President Uhuru Kenyatta was not going to be fair.



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Nevada gun shows tied to firearm violence in California: study

Nevada gun shows tied to firearm violence in California: studyBy Dan Whitcomb LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – Firearms-related deaths and injuries increased 70 percent in parts of California in the weeks after gun shows in neighboring Nevada, which has fewer regulations on such events, a University of California, Berkeley study released on Monday found. The research could help prevent gun deaths by charting a pattern between where weapons are purchased at gun shows and where shootings take place, according to the authors. The study, which was partly funded by the National Institutes of Health, examined firearm injury rates before and after California and Nevada gun shows between 2005 and 2013 in areas of California near the shows.



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Russian Radio Journalist Stabbed In Neck Amid Anti-Media Violence

Russian Radio Journalist Stabbed In Neck Amid Anti-Media ViolenceA prominent journalist at Russia’s top independent radio station was stabbed in the neck on Monday after a spate of recent attacks and threats against Russian media.



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NRA: Weaker Gun Laws Answer to Gun Violence

NRA: Weaker Gun Laws Answer to Gun ViolenceA top National Rifle Association lobbyist went on Fox News on Thursday night to argue for weaker gun laws in the wake of the Las Vegas shooting.



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One mass shooting every day: Seven facts about gun violence in America

One mass shooting every day: Seven facts about gun violence in AmericaYesterday's gun attack at a Las Vegas country music festival has left at least 59 people dead. It was the deadliest mass shooting in modern US history, once again highlighting America's extreme rate of gun violence – a rate that other developed nations don't come anywhere near matching. The frequency of this kind of event risks anaesthetising us to the number of people who die from shootings in one of the world's most developed nations. The numbers are staggering. Gun ownership rates per country 1. The Las Vegas mass shooting wasn't the only mass shooting in America on Sunday While the scale of the attack in Las Vegas on Sunday night is unparalleled, it wasn't the only mass shooting to occur in the US that day. Some 13,000 miles away in Lawrence, just outside the University of Kansas in Kansas, two men and a woman were killed and a further two people injured in a mass shooting incident. While none of the three victims were students at the university, all were in their early twenties, with one of the young men recently having become a father, according to the local press. Mass shootings in America – defined as an event where at least four people are shot – are now an every day event. The Las Vegas attack makes October the most deadly month for mass shootings this year – although not by as much as some may think, given the scale of the atrocity. The scale of US mass shootings in 2017 2. One major mass shooting every two months This year's deaths follow a depressing trend, according to data gathered by the Gun Violence Archive. Some 346 people are estimated to have been killed in American mass shootings this year. This compared to 432 in 2016, and 369 in 2015 – more than one person for every day of the year. When it comes to major mass shootings (where more than four people are killed), there have been an average of just 72 days between events during the period of 2010 to 2017 . This is a far more frequent rate when compared to the average gap of 162 days from 2000 to 2010, according to data compiled by Mother Jones. The two worst mass shooting events – this week's Las Vegas shooting and the Pulse nightclub atrocity in Orlando – have occurred in the last two years. More than a person a day have been killed in US mass shootings in recent years 3. Firearms sales go up after mass shootings Data from the FBI shows us that there have been 269.5m firearms background checks since November 1998 – and the number is increasing as time goes by. Such background checks, initiated through the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS), do not represent the number of firearms sold – but they do give us an idea as to interest in buying guns across the country. In an alarming pattern identified by the New York Times, the fear of firearms restrictions is a significant driver of gun sales – with mass shootings and other attacks being another, although to a lesser extent. For example, December 2015 saw the highest number of background checks to date – at 3.3m. This followed the San Bernardino terror attack in November, in which 14 people died and after which Obama called for tighter restrictions on the purchase of assault rifles. Firearm checks peak after attacks and potential restrictions 4. 270m guns for 320m people In 2007, the Small Arms Survey estimated that there were between 250m and 290m civilian-owned firearms in the US – a rate of around 90 per 100 people. This was the highest rate of civilian guns for any of the 178 countries that were surveyed and was ahead of Yemen (55 guns per 100 civilians) in second place by quite some distance. Higher rates of gun ownership correlate strongly with occurrences of mass shootings with the US emerging at the top of tree when it came to mass shootings per head in a study by Jaclyn Schildkraut of the State University of New York.  Countries with more guns have more mass shootings 5. Mass shootings are just the tip of the iceberg Between 2001 and 2013, 406,496 people died as a result of gun violence in America according to the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention. Of this number the majority – 237,052 – were actually suicides as opposed to homicides. Homicides accounted for 153,144 deaths over this period while the rest comprised 8,383 accidental deaths, 4,778 deaths from police shootings and 3,200 where the cause couldn't be determined.  In this context, mass shootings make up a comparatively small proportion of overall gun deaths in the US, accounting for around three per cent of homicides in 2017 so far according to the Gun Violence Archive. Suicides account for most US gun deaths 6. Texas is often at the frontline of mass shootings In 2015, there were 45 deaths from Texan mass shootings. In 2016, the state saw 39 victims. This year, the running total is 28. While individual large tragedies may skew the data for particular years, Texas is consistently bad for gun violence. After the Las Vegas attack, Nevada has suffered the most deaths from mass shootings this year – at 59 deaths – but it is also top when we make the number proportional to a state's population. It being a small state, Nevada has now had 20 mass shooting deaths per one million of its people – with the next highest rates seen in Mississippi (7.4 per million) and Kansas (3.4 per million). Map: America’s mass shootings hotspots 7. Americans can't agree on gun control The debate over gun rights and restrictions is not a new one in America – and it's opened up every time another mass shooting catches the public's attention.  The latest polling from the Pew Research Centre shows that 47 per cent of Americans support protecting gun rights – compared to 51 per cent who support gun control (6 April 2017). This polling has tightened over the last two decades – when 65 per cent were in favour of gun control in May 1999 – ensuring that the debate continues to rage on. The gun debate is anything but settled At the end of 2016, The Telegraph published a piece called "The face of America's gun problem" which aimed to document all 432 victims of American mass shootings in 2016.



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Catalonian referendum violence plunges EU into crisis as '90pc of voters back independence'

Catalonian referendum violence plunges EU into crisis as '90pc of voters back independence'Catalonia's government said 90 percent of those who voted in an unauthorised independence referendum chose to split from Spain. On a day marred by clashes between police and voters, 2.26 million people took part in the referendum,  regional government spokesman Jordi Turull said. That represents a turnout of  42.3 percent of Catalonia's 5.34 million voters. A woman tends to her injuries in front of riot police near a school being used as a polling station  Credit: Geraldine Hope Ghelli/Bloomberg Of those who took part,  2.02 million Catalans voted "yes" to the question: "Do you want Catalonia to become an independent state in the form of a republic?" The preliminary results pave the way for the region's leader to declare independence in the coming days, despite the Spanish government ruling the referendum illegal.  Catalan referendum results The brutal scenes of police cracking down on the referendum plunged the EU into a new crisis after hundreds of people were injured in the violent stand-offs with Spanish police. In violent scenes beamed around the world, officers in riot gear fired rubber bullets into crowds and beat would-be voters with batons as they queued at polling stations. The Catalan government claimed 844 people were injured. There was widespread condemnation of the Spanish government's attempt to crack down on the vote, which Catalan authorities had called despite the courts ruling it illegal. However, the European Union remained conspicuously silent on the police tactics, which saw masked officers smash their way into polling stations and forcibly remove ballot boxes. Catalan referendum: Clashes as voters defy Madrid 01:01 Carles Puigdemont, the Catalan leader, said the region had "won the right to an independent state" after "millions" turned out to vote in a banned independence referendum. "With this day of hope and suffering, the citizens of Catalonia have won the right to an independent state in the form a republic," he said in a televised announcement after polls had closed. Before the results were announced, he said he would keep his pledge to declare independence unilaterally within 48 hours of the vote if the "Yes" side won the referendum.  People hold Catalan flags as they listen to Catalan President Carles Puigdemont speak via a televised press conference as they await the result of the Indepenence Referendum at the Placa de Catalunya Credit: Getty "Today the Spanish state wrote another shameful page in its history with Catalonia," he said, adding that he would appeal to the European Union to look into alleged human rights violations during Sunday's vote. Violence broke out across Catalonia as armoured police moved in to break up the vote.  Video footage showed officers from Spain's national police – 4,000 of whom had been brought in by the government to help quash the ballot – fighting with elderly voters, some of whom were left bleeding, and dragging young women away from polling stations by their hair. Amid tense scenes, uniformed Catalan firefighters appeared to act as human shields to protect voters from advancing lines of police. Firemen try to hold a group of people in front of Spanish Guardia Civil officers outside a polling station in San Julia de Ramis Credit: LUIS GENE/AFP/Getty Images Responding to the unfolding crisis, Boris Johnson, the Foreign Secretary, told the Daily Telegraph last night: "Obviously we are very anxious about any violence. We hope that things will sort themselves out, though clearly you have to be sensitive to the constitutional proprieties." He added: "As I understand it the referendum is not legal, so there are difficulties." Nicola Sturgeon described the Foreign Office's statement as "shamefully weak". Statement from @foreignoffice on #Catalonia is shamefully weak. A true friend of Spain would tell them today’s actions wrong and damaging. pic.twitter.com/bBnCmn5BWw— Nicola Sturgeon (@NicolaSturgeon) October 1, 2017 "A true friend of Spain would tell them today’s actions wrong and damaging," Scotland's First Minister said. Andrew Rosindell, a Tory MP who sits on the Foreign Affairs Select Committee, said he believed the European Union’s response would have been much stronger if such scenes were playing out in other EU countries. He told the Daily Telegraph the European Union was "showing itself again to be completely hypocritical".  Spanish police push people with a shield outside a polling station in Barcelona Credit: PAU BARRENA/AFP/Getty Images Mr Rosindell accused the Spanish government of trying to “bully the people” and that the violence “shows both Spain and the EU in a very bad light”. He said: “For years the Spanish have used the Guardia Civil to make life as difficult as possible for Gibraltar and they are using the same police force again to attack the people of Catalonia. “In other circumstances there is no doubt the EU would be coming down like a tonne of bricks. They are demonstrating double standards: If this was happening in Hungary or another country there would certainly be a different reaction.” While some MEPs including Guy Verhofstadt – the parliament's Brexit negotiator – condemned the police violence as 'disproportionate', the European Commission said it would not respond to the crisis until Monday. Catalan referendum in pictures European leaders were also noticeably silent. The only voice emerging from Brussels was that of the Belgium prime minister, Charles Michel. On Twitter, he called for political dialogue to resolve the crisis, insisting: “Violence can never be the answer!” Spain, meanwhile, did not waver in its assertion that the referendum – which was ordered suspended by the Spanish constitutional court – is illegal, and that its hand has been forced by a Catalan government it claims is engaged in a coup.  Spain's foreign minister Alfonso Dastis said the violence was "unfortunate" and "unpleasant" but "proportionate", blaming the violence exclusively on Mr Puigdemont and his regional government. Spain's Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy delivers a statement at the Moncloa Palace in Madrid Credit: Sergio Perez/Reuters Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy last night said: "We did what we had to do", describing the ballot as a “premeditated attack on the legality of the Spanish state faced down with serenity by the forces of order”. Making no mention of the large number of people injured in police charges outside polling stations, Mr Rajoy said: “Democracy won today because the Constitution was upheld”. He said the police 'performed their duty' in Catalonia. People clash with Spanish Guardia Civil guards Credit: RAYMOND ROIG/AFP/Getty Images The Spanish deputy prime minister, Soraya Sáenz de Santamaría, blasted the Catalan government’s “irresponsibility” in insisting on holding an “illegal referendum with no democratic guarantees”, demanding that they end what she described as a “farce”. The Catalan government contends it has been forced to go ahead with the unilateral poll, saying it has been left no other option after the central government consistently refused substantive negotiations over the region’s status. In the event of a "Yes" vote, Mr Puigdemont plans to make a unilateral declaration of independence 48 hours after the results, which are expected to be announced Monday. In pictures: Catalan farmers block streets and protect polling stations He told The Telegraph last week that he would then be seeking dialogue with Spain and the European Union, insisting that Europe could no longer "keep looking the other way". Mr Puigdemont insisted Sunday that the poll had been carried out successfully despite the police crackdown, with voting taking place in 95 percent of polling stations. Spanish National riot policemen form a security cordon around the Ramon Llull school  Credit: EPA/Alberto Estevez "Batons against ballot boxes, violence against public spirit," he said, claiming "the shame will stay with (Spain) forever". Security concerns even had an impact on Sunday’s football. FC Barcelona initially suspended its home match against Las Palmas as a precaution, but ended up playing behind closed doors after Spain’s RFEF federation rejected the postponement. The European Commission, the EU’s civil service, has repeatedly backed the Spanish government and constitutional court’s stance that the vote is illegal. Thousands clash with police in Barcelona protests 01:04 Yesterday the EC told The Telegraph it had nothing to add a statement made by Jean-Claude Juncker on Friday, when he backed “the rule of law” in Spain. But human rights groups and politicians from around the world contended that regardless of the legality of the poll, the heavy-handed response went beyond what was unacceptable in a 21st century democracy. Andrew Stroehlein, of Human Rights Watch, said that despite the court suspension, the government had a duty to protect the rights to peaceful assembly and freedom of expression. The EU would “have to say something more soon,” he suggested. Catalans have expressed particular concern about the use of rubber bullets, which the Catalan police force are banned from using, and which left one person needing eye surgery yesterday. How Catalonia is so important to Spain There were suggestions from several quarters that the Commission was taking a much laxer stance on Spain, a valued member of the EU core with an important stake in Brexit negotiations, than it would against other member states. “The fundamental rights of EU citizens are being damaged by this disproportionate use of violence against peaceful citizens,” Amadeu Altafaj, the permanent representative of the Catalan government to the EU in Brussels told the Telegraph.  “For some countries like Poland there are strict standards but when it comes to Spain, there seems to be a lot of complacency.”



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