Tag Archives: thought

'He Had Everything.' Anthony Bourdain's Mother Says She Never Thought He Would Commit Suicide

'He Had Everything.' Anthony Bourdain's Mother Says She Never Thought He Would Commit Suicide"He is absolutely the last person in the world I would have ever dreamed would do something like this"



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Was Starbucks' Racial Bias Training Effective? Here's What These Employees Thought

Was Starbucks' Racial Bias Training Effective? Here's What These Employees Thought“I was angry we had to educate people on how to not be racist"



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Republicans Who Thought North Korea Summit Would Save Election Now Rebooting

Republicans Who Thought North Korea Summit Would Save Election Now RebootingWASHINGTON ― While President Donald Trump may have seen a successful summit



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Republicans Who Thought North Korea Summit Would Save Election Now Rebooting

Republicans Who Thought North Korea Summit Would Save Election Now RebootingWASHINGTON ― While President Donald Trump may have seen a successful summit



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Southwest Emergency: Passengers Thought They'd Be Next After Engine Explosion Killed Mother of 2

Southwest Emergency: Passengers Thought They'd Be Next After Engine Explosion Killed Mother of 2Jennifer Riordan of New Mexico was killed after a Southwest Airlines jet engine exploded.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

I Thought Mediums Were Frauds Until I Met One Who Knew Things She Couldn't Have Known

I Thought Mediums Were Frauds Until I Met One Who Knew Things She Couldn't Have KnownThe woman with a bushy ponytail and a strong Boston accent who I have paid $ 40



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Cecile Richards on Trump Era activism: "Do more than you ever thought you could."

Cecile Richards on Trump Era activism: "Do more than you ever thought you could."Cecile Richards, longtime president of Planned Parenthood, speaks with Rachel Maddow about her new book “Make Trouble: Standing Up, Speaking Out, and Finding the Courage to Lead.”



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Researchers discover mummy in coffin thought to be empty

Researchers discover mummy in coffin thought to be emptySince it was bought 160 years ago, University of Sydney archaeologists didn't think there was much to a particular sarcophagus in its collection. The coffin of one Mer-Neith-it-es sat in the Nicholson Museum, listed as empty in a 1948 handbook, while the museum database said it contained "mixed debris." SEE ALSO: Why can't anyone find Amelia Earhart's bones? Dating circa 664-525 BCE, it had been purchased by an early founder of the university, Sir Charles Nicholson, as part of 408 Egyptian objects that would form a basis for a collection. It all changed last June, when researchers needed to take a photo of the previously undocumented hieroglyphics under the coffin. That's where they discovered the remains of human feet and bones. "It was an amazing moment of discovery," the Nicholson Museum's senior curator, Jamie Fraser, said. Mixed remains within the coffin.Image: nicholson museumThe discovery led to researchers embarking on a project to document all the mummies in the Nicholson Museum. Fraser said they had never been dealt with before because of how difficult and sensitive one needs to be when dealing with human remains. "Everything we do has to be respectful to that individual inside. To go through all these mixed jumble of remains is a hugely intricate, delicate job," he added.  As an old archaeological paradox goes, an excavation is at once an act of conservation and destruction. The materials would never be the same as it was found. Now, thanks to technology, researchers can capture high-resolution images of the mummy and its coffin before excavation. "Previously, the technology hasn't been there so curators have put it to one side to be dealt with later," Fraser said. "If we had done this project 10 years ago, we wouldn't have been able to do it. Now is the moment that we can actually address this." Last September, it worked with 3D scanning company WYSIWYG to create a digital model of Mer-Neith-it-es' coffin, with all its contents intact. "Researchers in 50, 100 years time will be able to use that and zoom right in to explore what's going on, to a tenth of a millimetre … we're really super pleased with it," he said.  Then in December, CT scanners were used to capture thousands of images of Mer-Neith-it-es' coffin and her remains, as well as other mummies in its collection: Horus, Meruah and Padiashiakhet. As researchers expected, the remains of Mer-Neith-it-es were mixed, but they did find ankles, feet and toes that belonged to one person at least 30 years of age.  The CT scanning not only helps with documenting the mummies in great detail, but also aids archeologists in guiding its excavation. Fraser said he's only aware of an unexpected discovery like this at Switzerland's Burgdorf Museum back in 2013.  That's because mummies fall into two categories: Ones that are discovered by archaeologists are kept intact, as there is no good reason to remove its contents. Others purchased at antiquities markets are often in bad condition. Mer-Neith-it-es falls in the later category. CT scan of Mer-Neith-it-es revealing the contents of her coffin.Image: Macquarie Medical ImagingThe next step, is for these four mummies to be included a purpose-built Mummy Room in the forthcoming Chau Chak Wing Museum. It's where Fraser and his team's work in the past six months will come together. "In this one room, we'll really focus on these four ancient individuals we have … and we'll discuss what it was like for these people in the ancient world," he said.  "It'll be a great opportunity to integrate all this scientific research we've done, like the CT animations and 3D models, and show them alongside the mummies." WATCH: MIT created this imposter robot fish to spy on sea creatures



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is up to 16 times more massive than thought

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is up to 16 times more massive than thoughtThe Great Pacific Garbage Patch (GPGP), a massive area of floating plastic debris that is more than twice the size of Texas, contains about 1.8 trillion pieces of plastic. This is between 4 and 16 times the mass of plastic that scientists previously estimated.  What's worse is that the amount of plastic within this area is growing "exponentially," according to a comprehensive three-year-long study using 30 vessels and a high-tech reconnaissance aircraft.  The study, published Thursday in the journal
Scientific Reports, provides a detailed analysis of the size and types of plastic caught up in the Garbage Patch, which occupies about 1.6 million square kilometers, or 617,763 square miles, between Hawaii and California.  SEE ALSO: A floating 'island of trash' has surfaced in the Caribbean The GPGP is just one of five ocean garbage patches that have developed around the world as people use more and more plastic, which is not biodegradable and is used for everything from water bottles to shipping crates. A fleet of 30 vessels, each dragging nets behind them to scoop up pieces of plastic, gathered 1.2 million samples. Scientists from The Ocean Cleanup Foundation in the Netherlands, as well as six universities and an aviation sensor company, used the samples they'd gathered to build a model of how plastic is transported in and out of the GPGP.  The study estimates that the approximately1.8 trillion pieces of plastic within the GPGP weighs about 80,000 metric tons. Another unexpected finding: Most of this mass — 92 percent — is composed of large plastic debris, such as crates and bottles, while just 8 percent or so of the mass is made up of microplastics, pieces smaller than 5 millimeters in size.  Modeled mass concentration of plastic in the Great Pacific Garbage PatchImage: THE OCEAN CLEANUP FOUNDATION/lebreton et. al. scientific reports."We were surprised by the amount of large plastic objects we encountered," said Julia Reisser, chief scientist of the expeditions, who works for The Ocean Cleanup Foundation, in a press release.  At least 46 percent of the mass was composed of ghostnets, or fishing nets drifting at sea, unmoored from the ships that once towed them, the study found.  “There’s a lot more plastic out there than thought,” said Boyan Slat, a co-author of the study and founder of The Ocean Cleanup Foundation, in an interview. Unlike earlier studies, which focused on collecting small pieces of plastic within a smaller area of the GPGP, this one attempted to capture the full range of debris floating in the GPGP. The armada of research ships used small nets to catch the small pieces, large ones to wrangle the medium-to-large pieces, and a C-130 Hercules aircraft equipped with LIDAR equipment in order to detect "these mega-pieces” of larger than 1 meter, Slat said.  Using their transport model, the researchers pointed to Asia as a main source of plastic pollution for the GPGP, particularly Japan and China, though plastics from North America contribute to it as well. Plastics that get routed into the Garbage Patch by winds and ocean currents are likely to be permanently trapped there, in a zone of little wind and devoid of weather systems that would break up and disperse the debris. Eventually, some of the surface plastic does sink to the ocean bottom, where it can endanger marine life.  A styrofoam buoy collected during the 2015 ocean surveyImage: the ocean Cleanup Foundation.The researchers used an "apples to apples" comparison of small plastic pieces, dating back to 1970, to analyze their mass estimates against previous studies, Slat said. The conclusion was inescapable: There is more and more plastic being added to the Garbage Patch each year, with far less plastic escaping, to the point where it's undergoing exponential growth.  This May, scientists and engineers affiliated with The Ocean Project plan to test out technology to clean up plastic from the sea, using a vessel off the California coast. The eventual plan is for the group to reduce plastic pollution by cleaning up the GPGP and similar areas of plastics around the world.  The nearly $ 40 million initiative relies on private funding; since 2013, they'd been raising funds using crowdfunding. Now, according to Slat, the group relies on a group of anonymous philanthropists, split about equally between Silicon Valley and Europe. One prominent investor is Marc Benioff, the founder and CEO of Salesforce, Slat said.  “We need to understand how much plastic is out there so that we can clean it up,” Slat said. The goal is to have the first plastic from the Garbage Patch recovered and back in port before the end of this year, Slat said. On its website, the foundation says its goal is to clean up 50 percent of the GPGP recovered within five years of deployment. WATCH: 'Supercolony' of 1.5m penguins discovered in Antarctica



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Parents talk about 'miracle' of daughter they thought had died in Florida shooting

Parents talk about 'miracle' of daughter they thought had died in Florida shootingDoctors and first responders who treated a student initially thought to have died in the Marjory Stoneman Douglas high school massacre have spoken of their battle to save the teenager’s life, and her incredible recovery from multiple gunshot wounds. Madeleine Wilford, 17, and her parents also spoke at a Monday press conference at Broward North hospital to praise the ambulance crew, surgeons and medical staff who resuscitated and operated on her, and talked of the “miracle” that allowed her to be discharged barely a week after she was shot in the rampage that killed 14 classmates and three adult teachers. “When they were clearing the rooms, at first sight it was believed Maddy had deceased,” said Lieutenant Laz Ojeda of the Coral Springs fire rescue department, a member of one of the first medical teams to enter the school.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines