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Pilots Say Boeing Didn't Tell Them About a Safety Feature Tied to a Deadly Crash

Pilots Say Boeing Didn't Tell Them About a Safety Feature Tied to a Deadly CrashIt may have contributed to a disaster that killed 189 people



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100 years on we shall remember them: Britain commemorates its WWI dead

100 years on we shall remember them: Britain commemorates its WWI deadThey may no longer be with us – the last of their number, Harry Patch, died in 2009, aged 111 – but we will remember them. Around the country thousands of people will pay tribute on Sunday to those who died on foreign soil or at sea for their country, and those at home who endured the anguish and hardship of global war. On the 100th anniversary of the Armistice events will take place in every corner of the British Isles to commemorate the sacrifice of a generation during the First World War, which only came to an end at 11am on November 11, 1918, after an almost incalculable loss of life. The numbers still have the power to shock. Between 1914 and 1918, 886,345 UK troops were killed. Another 228,569 troops from the wider British Empire were killed, more than 74,000 of them from India. Each one was a son, father, husband or brother who willingly or not, whether with courage or almost paralysed by fear, died in a conflict whose causes and conclusion were beyond their control. In addition there were 6.32 million civilians killed when total war visited their communities, 109,000 of them in the UK , 300,000 in France and 426,000 in Germany. The acts of remembrance being organised to commemorate this loss will be as varied as they will be moving. They range from the formal state occasion of the National Service of Remembrance at the Cenotaph, where Prime Minister Theresa May and the Prince of Wales will lay wreaths, and a special service at Westminster Abbey being attended by the Queen and other senior members of the Royal family, to the Yorkshire town of Otley, where posters will be hung on more than 100 doors to remember the man who lived there but never returned from the front line. In addition each house in the town will also display a knitted poppy, with another 16,000 installed along the railings outside of All Saints Parish Church. The familiar chimes of Big Ben will mark the centenary of the Armistice, despite the clock tower being covered in scaffolding for conservation works. The 13.7 tonne bell, which hangs in the Elizabeth Tower in Westminster, will sound 11 times at 11am today for the traditional two minutes of remembrance. It will strike a further 11 times at 12.30 with bells ringing across the UK and worldwide as part of a nationwide programme of events to mark the end of the war. Wire Sculptor Jackie Lantelli from Slimbridge in Gloucestershire, England, with her Wire Soldiers installation at St John's Churchyard, Slimbridge,  Credit: PAUL NICHOLLS Many of today’s commemorative events have been communal efforts, drawing in whole families to remember the dead. In the West Midlands town of Walsall almost 100 houses in one street have been covered with 24,000 red poppies and the black silhouette statues of soldiers, symbolising the men from the area who were killed. Geoff Talbot, 74, one of those who decorated his home, said: "Lots of people have put a lot of effort to do this. In those days Aldridge was only a village, but a lot of local young men left and never came back. It is an absolutely nice way to do a tribute for them." A huge wall of 2,500 poppies also festoons the Bell Inn in nearby Willenhall, after locals painstakingly knitted the individual flowers by hand over a 24-month period. The day will not be without the kind of ironic humour one imagines would have been appreciated by the Tommies whose death in their thousands across the Western Front remain embedded in popular memory. Thwaites brewery, in Lancashire, is honouring one of WWI's Victoria Cross winners by naming the Shire horse that deliver its beer around Blackburn after him. The two-year-old gelding is being named ‘Drummer’ in honour of the East Lancashire Regiment's first WWI Victoria Cross winner, Drummer John Bent, aged 23. Bent was commended after saving a soldier from no-man's land and leading his platoon into action under fire after their officers and NCO's were all killed on 1st November 1914, near Le Gheer, Belgium. Drummer Bent’s was the 24th of a total of 628 VCs awarded during WWI. As well as recalling his heroism, the name 'Drummer' also commemorates the role of thousands of horses in the Great War. White van driver Christopher Curtis, 32, from Oldham, who served for 11 years as a Sapper in the Royal Engineers, has sketched the silhouette of a soldier standing over a field of poppies with the words "Lest We Forget" in the dirt on the back of his van. In Bolton, criminals sentenced to unpaid work orders by magistrates were deployed to decorate lamp posts, the town hall and other landmarks in the Lancashire town with 500 giant poppies. The factory in Aylesford, Kent, that makes poppies has worked around the clock for the first time to meet the unprecedented demand for the symbol of Remembrance Day, producing more than 1,500 a day for the past two and a half weeks. Mandy Barker, Head Flower Arranger, and Julia Weston, Volunteer, arrange flowers on the Remembrance Cross for Sunday's Service at York Minster Credit: Charlotte Graham/The Telegraph In a measure of the continuity of the tradition of remembrance a box of poppies believed to be from one of the early Poppy Appeals has been discovered in an old suitcase in Cardiff.. Bernie Axtell, 77, found them while searching for paperwork in his home. They are believed to date from before the Second World War and will be brought to the Cenotaph by Royal British Legion representatives today. Mr Axtell was handed the box of poppies by his friend Vic Luckhurst about 30 years ago, while working for the Legion in Street, Somerset. “I said to Vic that I would find something special to do with them,” he said. “Thirty years is a very long time to wait, but now they are doing something extraordinary." In Portsmouth a 24-hour guard of honour was being held at the city’s Cenotaph, with 200 people, including schoolchildren, veterans and serving members of the armed forces, working in 15-minute slots to stand by the monument until 10am today. Meanwhile silhouettes of soldiers from the First World War have been projected onto famous landmarks around the country by the There But Not There project to raise money for mental health charities. There include Marble Arch, Tate Modern, HMS Belfast, the Angel of the North, the Tyne Bridge, Titanic Belfast and Edinburgh Castle. In Ilfracombe, Devon, it was the bodies of people that made their mark yesterday, recreating a famous photograph from 100 years ago by spelling out the word ‘peace’ on nearby Capstone Hill to remember those who died so that we might preserve it. Residents of a Devon town have re-enacted a classic photograph to mark the 100th anniversary of the end of World War One. Locals and members of the public alike helped to recreate the original picture from 1919 by spelling out the word 'PEACE' on Capstone Hill in Ilfracombe.  Credit: MARK PASSMORE/APEX The original picture from 1919 in which residents of Ilfracombe spell out the word 'peace' Credit: Apex News and Pictures  



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100 years on we shall remember them: Britain commemorates its WWI dead

100 years on we shall remember them: Britain commemorates its WWI deadThey may no longer be with us – the last of their number, Harry Patch, died in 2009, aged 111 – but we will remember them. Around the country thousands of people will pay tribute on Sunday to those who died on foreign soil or at sea for their country, and those at home who endured the anguish and hardship of global war. On the 100th anniversary of the Armistice events will take place in every corner of the British Isles to commemorate the sacrifice of a generation during the First World War, which only came to an end at 11am on November 11, 1918, after an almost incalculable loss of life. The numbers still have the power to shock. Between 1914 and 1918, 886,345 UK troops were killed. Another 228,569 troops from the wider British Empire were killed, more than 74,000 of them from India. Each one was a son, father, husband or brother who willingly or not, whether with courage or almost paralysed by fear, died in a conflict whose causes and conclusion were beyond their control. In addition there were 6.32 million civilians killed when total war visited their communities, 109,000 of them in the UK , 300,000 in France and 426,000 in Germany. The acts of remembrance being organised to commemorate this loss will be as varied as they will be moving. They range from the formal state occasion of the National Service of Remembrance at the Cenotaph, where Prime Minister Theresa May and the Prince of Wales will lay wreaths, and a special service at Westminster Abbey being attended by the Queen and other senior members of the Royal family, to the Yorkshire town of Otley, where posters will be hung on more than 100 doors to remember the man who lived there but never returned from the front line. In addition each house in the town will also display a knitted poppy, with another 16,000 installed along the railings outside of All Saints Parish Church. The familiar chimes of Big Ben will mark the centenary of the Armistice, despite the clock tower being covered in scaffolding for conservation works. The 13.7 tonne bell, which hangs in the Elizabeth Tower in Westminster, will sound 11 times at 11am today for the traditional two minutes of remembrance. It will strike a further 11 times at 12.30 with bells ringing across the UK and worldwide as part of a nationwide programme of events to mark the end of the war. Wire Sculptor Jackie Lantelli from Slimbridge in Gloucestershire, England, with her Wire Soldiers installation at St John's Churchyard, Slimbridge,  Credit: PAUL NICHOLLS Many of today’s commemorative events have been communal efforts, drawing in whole families to remember the dead. In the West Midlands town of Walsall almost 100 houses in one street have been covered with 24,000 red poppies and the black silhouette statues of soldiers, symbolising the men from the area who were killed. Geoff Talbot, 74, one of those who decorated his home, said: "Lots of people have put a lot of effort to do this. In those days Aldridge was only a village, but a lot of local young men left and never came back. It is an absolutely nice way to do a tribute for them." A huge wall of 2,500 poppies also festoons the Bell Inn in nearby Willenhall, after locals painstakingly knitted the individual flowers by hand over a 24-month period. The day will not be without the kind of ironic humour one imagines would have been appreciated by the Tommies whose death in their thousands across the Western Front remain embedded in popular memory. Thwaites brewery, in Lancashire, is honouring one of WWI's Victoria Cross winners by naming the Shire horse that deliver its beer around Blackburn after him. The two-year-old gelding is being named ‘Drummer’ in honour of the East Lancashire Regiment's first WWI Victoria Cross winner, Drummer John Bent, aged 23. Bent was commended after saving a soldier from no-man's land and leading his platoon into action under fire after their officers and NCO's were all killed on 1st November 1914, near Le Gheer, Belgium. Drummer Bent’s was the 24th of a total of 628 VCs awarded during WWI. As well as recalling his heroism, the name 'Drummer' also commemorates the role of thousands of horses in the Great War. White van driver Christopher Curtis, 32, from Oldham, who served for 11 years as a Sapper in the Royal Engineers, has sketched the silhouette of a soldier standing over a field of poppies with the words "Lest We Forget" in the dirt on the back of his van. In Bolton, criminals sentenced to unpaid work orders by magistrates were deployed to decorate lamp posts, the town hall and other landmarks in the Lancashire town with 500 giant poppies. The factory in Aylesford, Kent, that makes poppies has worked around the clock for the first time to meet the unprecedented demand for the symbol of Remembrance Day, producing more than 1,500 a day for the past two and a half weeks. Mandy Barker, Head Flower Arranger, and Julia Weston, Volunteer, arrange flowers on the Remembrance Cross for Sunday's Service at York Minster Credit: Charlotte Graham/The Telegraph In a measure of the continuity of the tradition of remembrance a box of poppies believed to be from one of the early Poppy Appeals has been discovered in an old suitcase in Cardiff.. Bernie Axtell, 77, found them while searching for paperwork in his home. They are believed to date from before the Second World War and will be brought to the Cenotaph by Royal British Legion representatives today. Mr Axtell was handed the box of poppies by his friend Vic Luckhurst about 30 years ago, while working for the Legion in Street, Somerset. “I said to Vic that I would find something special to do with them,” he said. “Thirty years is a very long time to wait, but now they are doing something extraordinary." In Portsmouth a 24-hour guard of honour was being held at the city’s Cenotaph, with 200 people, including schoolchildren, veterans and serving members of the armed forces, working in 15-minute slots to stand by the monument until 10am today. Meanwhile silhouettes of soldiers from the First World War have been projected onto famous landmarks around the country by the There But Not There project to raise money for mental health charities. There include Marble Arch, Tate Modern, HMS Belfast, the Angel of the North, the Tyne Bridge, Titanic Belfast and Edinburgh Castle. In Ilfracombe, Devon, it was the bodies of people that made their mark yesterday, recreating a famous photograph from 100 years ago by spelling out the word ‘peace’ on nearby Capstone Hill to remember those who died so that we might preserve it. Residents of a Devon town have re-enacted a classic photograph to mark the 100th anniversary of the end of World War One. Locals and members of the public alike helped to recreate the original picture from 1919 by spelling out the word 'PEACE' on Capstone Hill in Ilfracombe.  Credit: MARK PASSMORE/APEX The original picture from 1919 in which residents of Ilfracombe spell out the word 'peace' Credit: Apex News and Pictures  



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Suspects Charged After Officer Falls to His Death While Chasing Them

Suspects Charged After Officer Falls to His Death While Chasing ThemChaunt’ Tuan Gillespie and Valention Miller have been formally charged in connection to the death of a Washington Park Auxiliary Officer in Illinois. According to authorities, Ricardo Davis, 44, fell to his death while chasing the suspects on the Poplar Street Bridge on Saturday.



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Sean Hannity Uses Suspicious Packages Sent To Dems To Call Them Hypocritical

Sean Hannity Uses Suspicious Packages Sent To Dems To Call Them HypocriticalSean Hannity used the mailing of suspicious packages and potential explosive



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Girl baked grandfather's ashes into cookies and gave them to classmates, police say

Girl baked grandfather's ashes into cookies and gave them to classmates, police sayA high school student mixed her cremated grandfather’s ashes into homemade biscuits and gave them to classmates, police in California have said. The youngster and a friend shared the cookies with nine other pupils at Da Vinci Charter Academy in the city of Davis. “She had mentioned her grandpa’s ashes before,” said Andy Knox.



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Astronauts make emergency landing after Russian rocket carrying them to International Space Station fails

Astronauts make emergency landing after Russian rocket carrying them to International Space Station failsAn American and Russian astronaut have survived an emergency landing in Kazakhstan after the Soyuz rocket carrying them to the International Space Station failed in mid-flight.  The latest in a long string of Russian rocket crashes, Thursday's star-crossed flight is yet another black eye for the Roscosmos space agency, which remains the only reliable way to get to the ISS. The Russian-made rocket began to plummet to earth a little more than two minutes into the six-hour mission due to a “vehicle malfunction”. The engines were seen to cut out in the air, after which the Soyuz MS-10 spaceship holding Russian commander Alexei Ovchinin and Nasa astronaut Nick Hague jettisoned from the drifting launch vehicle. An internal camera showed the capsule jerking the pair around violently as the flight malfunctioned. Soyuz-FG rocket booster blasts off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome carrying the Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft with Roscosmos cosmonaut Alexei Ovchinin and NASA astronaut Nick Hague of the ISS Expedition 57/58 prime crew aboard to the International Space Station (ISS) Credit: Donat Sorokin/TASS The video link broke off and the pair plunged toward the ground in “ballistic descent mode,” experiencing gravitational forces six times normal.  The capsule's parachute deployed successfully, however, landing them on the grassy steppe near Zhezkazgan, about 250 miles from the Baikonur cosmodrome rented by Russia. State media showed rescuers helping the two crew members into a helicopter, and Nasa said the men were in good condition. “Vehicle malfunction. That was a quick flight,” Mr Ovchinin declared dryly over the radio at the beginning of the emergency descent. Rescuers help the two crew members out of a helicopter in Kazakhstan Credit: Russian Central Military District/TASS via Getty Images The crash comes after Roscosmos head Dmitry Rogozin accused Elon Musk of conspiring with the Pentagon to force other players out of the space industry and suggested that international astronauts had sabotaged the ISS by drilling the hole found in its hull. Adding to the embarrassment was a string of tweets by Roscosmos detailing the successful completion of three launch stages that never actually happened.  The agency later deleted tweets with false information such as “287 seconds: The second stage successfully jettisoned”.   Russia's space agency has deleted the tweets detailing the successful launch that didn't actually happen, but here are screenshots. The ship had crashed before the second stage could "jettison normally at 287 seconds" pic.twitter.com/AD8o4MPPjI— Alec Luhn (@ASLuhn) October 11, 2018 After a normal liftoff from the same launchpad from where Yury Gagarin began the first manned space flight, the accident occurred amid the transition from the four large launch boosters to the next set of engines.  “Thank God the crew is alive,” Vladimir Putin's spokesman said.  “According to preliminary information, the cause [of the crash] came during the separation of the first stage from the second stage,” Yury Borisov, deputy prime minister for the military industrial complex, told reporters. “A special commission will get to the bottom of this.” A Nasa statement blamed an “anomaly with the booster” for the incident and promised a thorough investigation. Astronauts emergency landing location – Kazakhstan Part of the second stage may have gotten caught on the first due to “poor fastening,” pushing the craft off-course and causing the emergency shutdown of the engines, Interfax news agency quoted a space industry source as saying.    Further Roscosmos launches have been suspended, Mr Borisov said. Another two-man Russian-American crew had been scheduled to set out for the space station on 20 December.  An American, a Russian and a German astronaut who had planned to return from the ISS on the Soyuz MS-10 ship will have to reconsider their plans.  A plume of smoke trails behind the rocket before its crash Credit: Shamil Zhumatov/Reuters Besides the two astronauts, the crashed rocket had been carrying supplies, but the ISS has enough reserves for another six months of operations.  Roscosmos tweeted photographs of Mr Rogozin speaking with Mr Hague and Mr Ovchinin while they relaxed on couches with blood pressure and pulse monitors on their arms. After a medical examination they would fly back to Moscow, it said.  Russian experts said the astronauts, both former military pilots, had been trained to withstand even more intense g-forces. A rescue team arrives at the capsule after it crash landed in the grasslands of Kazakhstan 250 miles from Baikonur cosmodrome Credit: Russian Central Military District/TASS via Getty Images A lengthening list of accidents has raised doubts about the state of Russia's space programme.   In a gross human error, an unmanned Soyuz rocket launched from Russia's new Vostochny cosmodrome in November crashed into the Atlantic Ocean after it was programmed with the launch coordinates for Baikonur. The disaster, which came after Mr Rogozin had declared the mission a success, destroyed 19 international satellites worth hundreds of millions of dollars.  Russian unmanned cargo rockets of different designs crashed in 2016, 2015 and 2014.  Alexei Ovchinin and Nick Hague wave to onlookers before boarding the spacecraft Credit: Sergei Savostyanov/TASS/Barcroft In 2013, a Proton-M rocket carrying three satellites for the Glonass navigation system, Russia's rival to GPS, burst into flames and slammed into the crowd on live television.  Mr Rogozin, who was sanctioned by the United States and European Union in 2014 over Russia's intervention in Ukraine crisis, lost his position as deputy prime minister this year but retained much of his influence with the appointment as head of Roscosmos.  Speaking to state television on Thursday, he praised the "calm actions" of the crew and ground controllers but said conclusions about the crash could only come later. The ISS, which has been circling the earth at more than 17,000 miles per hour since 1998, is one of the few remaining areas of cooperation between Moscow and Washington amid rising political tensions. Mr Hague was born in 1975, the year the United States and Soviet Union launched their first joint space mission. 



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Many Of Brett Kavanaugh's Ex-Classmates Wanted To Talk — But FBI Reportedly 'Ignored' Them

Many Of Brett Kavanaugh's Ex-Classmates Wanted To Talk — But FBI Reportedly 'Ignored' ThemDozens of people reportedly reached out to the FBI in recent days in the hopes



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Many Of Brett Kavanaugh's Ex-Classmates Wanted To Talk — But FBI Reportedly 'Ignored' Them

Many Of Brett Kavanaugh's Ex-Classmates Wanted To Talk — But FBI Reportedly 'Ignored' ThemDozens of people reportedly reached out to the FBI in recent days in the hopes



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Texan man claims he’s selling 3D-printed gun plans despite court order blocking his company from posting them online

Texan man claims he’s selling 3D-printed gun plans despite court order blocking his company from posting them onlineA man from Texas has said his company is selling blueprints for 3D-printed guns online despite a federal order barring his company from posting the designs online until a court case is resolved. On Monday, US District Judge Robert Lasnik granted a preliminary injunction blocking Cody Wilson’s company, Defense Distributed, from posting the prints online. Mr Lasnik had previously filed a temporary restraining order blocking the designs from being published.



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