Tag Archives: Test

Navy vs. Nukes: U.S. Navy Plans to Test Missile Defenses Against ICBM

Navy vs. Nukes: U.S. Navy Plans to Test Missile Defenses Against ICBMThe Pentagon plans a “first-of-its-kind” test of an unprecedented weapons capability to intercept and destroy an enemy Intercontinental Ballistic Missile "ICBM" — from a Navy ship at sea using a Standard Missile-3 Block IIA.



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North Korea may suspend talks with 'gangster-like' U.S., rethink nuclear test freeze

North Korea may suspend talks with 'gangster-like' U.S., rethink nuclear test freezeU.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the United States wished to continue talks with North Korea and had “every expectation” that its leader, Kim Jong Un, would stick to pledges not to resume nuclear and missile testing. Pompeo gave no sign of U.S. willingness to soften its stance in demanding that North Korea give up its nuclear weapons. North Korean Vice Foreign Minister Choe Son Hui blamed top U.S. officials for the breakdown of last month’s summit between Kim and U.S. President Donald Trump in Hanoi, Russia’s TASS news agency and the Associated Press reported.



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Aide says Trump would be 'disappointed' by a N.Korea test

Aide says Trump would be 'disappointed' by a N.Korea testDonald Trump’s national security advisor said Sunday that the US president would be “pretty disappointed” if North Korea conducted a new missile test, but he refused to confirm reports that such a test may be near. John Bolton appeared notably cautious when asked on ABC’s “This Week” about a report that satellite imagery appears to show preparations at a North Korean site for the possible launch of a missile or space rocket. On Friday, the website of NPR posted a satellite image that the public broadcaster said showed intense activity around the North’s Sanumdong site, where missiles and satellite-launching rockets have previously been assembled.



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Bolton: Trump would be 'disappointed' if North Korea launches missile test

Bolton: Trump would be 'disappointed' if North Korea launches missile testNational security adviser speaks after reports based on imagery suggest Pyongyang was continuing work at rocket launching siteImage of the Sohae Satellite Launch Facility in North Korea. Photograph: APDonald Trump would be “pretty disappointed” if North Korea launches a new rocket or carries out a missile test, national security adviser John Bolton said on Sunday.Bolton spoke on ABC’s This Week, regarding reports based on imagery from commercial satellites analysed by nongovernmental groups which suggested Pyongyang was continuing work and had been doing so before Trump and Kim Jong-un’s summit in Vietnam last month.Refusing to comment specifically Bolton said “there’s a lot of activity all the time in North Korea” and added: “Nothing in the proliferation game surprises me anymore.”Trump, he said, would be “pretty disappointed if Kim Jong-un went ahead and did something like” a launch, the president having said the North Korean leader “promised” he would not do so at the recent summit.Bolton was echoing Trump’s language earlier this week, when he told reporters he would be “very disappointed” if the North was working on tests.“I would be very, very disappointed in Chairman Kim,” Trump said on Wednesday. “And I don’t think I will be, but we’ll see what happens. We’ll take a look. It’ll ultimately get solved.”Trump and Kim’s Vietnam meeting ended abruptly without a deal on North Korean denuclearisation in return for sanctions relief.On Friday, Trump told reporters his relationship with Kim was “a very good one” and said he would be “surprised in a negative way if he did anything that was not per our understanding”.Bolton struck a more cautious tone, telling ABC “one mistake that previous administrations made was assuming that North Korea will comply when they undertake obligations”.“The North Koreans have pledged to give up their nuclear weapons programme at least five separate times, beginning in 1992 … they never seem to get around to it, though.”He added: “I think Kim Jong-un has a very clear idea of where the president stands, what the objectives he’s trying to achieve are.”Trump and Kim first met in Singapore in June 2018, producing only a North Korean commitment to “work towards complete denuclearisation of the Korean peninsula”.Bolton told ABC he was not aware of any contact between the US and North Korea since Vietnam, though it was “possible the South Koreans have spoken to North Korea”. Trump, he said, was “open” to a third summit, though “some time may have to go by”.



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SpaceX's Crew Dragon test flight gets through the toughest bit without issue

SpaceX's Crew Dragon test flight gets through the toughest bit without issueSpaceX sent its Crew Dragon capsule skyward on Saturday for a crucial test of its ability to carry human passengers. Now, slightly more than 24 hours later, the next phase of the test has played out. It went well. The Crew Dragon capsule, designated Demo-1, was able to successfully dock with the International Space Station at roughly 3:00 a.m. ET. Although there was no crew aboard this time, SpaceX's reusable capsule is designed to carry up to seven astronauts to and from Earth's orbit. SEE ALSO: SpaceX kicks off a 'new era in spaceflight' with the Crew Dragon launch The company has been sending an earlier version of its capsule to the ISS for a number of years, but in those instances the space station's robotic arm has helped the smaller vehicle successfully dock. For this test, the Crew Dragon's own navigational system handled the docking procedure — and it happened without issue. Capture confirmed! After making 18 orbits of Earth since its launch, @SpaceX’s #CrewDragon spacecraft successfully attached to the @Space_Station via “soft capture” at 5:51am ET while the station was traveling just north of New Zealand. Watch: t.co/oJKHgK8eV7 pic.twitter.com/xO1rU5cAMM — NASA (@NASA) March 3, 2019 Listen to those cheers. Once the capsule docked, the three-person crew aboard the ISS — all of whom were prepared to evacuate during the docking procedure if something went wrong — opened it up to greet Ripley, the sensor-laden dummy that flew in alongside 400 pounds of supplies and a plush Earth doll. The capsule will remain at the ISS for another five days. The hatch is open! At 8:07am ET, crew members aboard our orbiting laboratory opened the hatch between @SpaceX’s #CrewDragon spacecraft and the @Space_Station. Watch: t.co/oJKHgK8eV7 pic.twitter.com/NKFisziToV — NASA (@NASA) March 3, 2019 .@AstroAnnimal welcomes humans aboard the first @SpaceX #CrewDragon to visit the station and introduces two special guests, Ripley and Little Earth, ushering in the era of @Commercial_Crew. #LaunchAmerica pic.twitter.com/QqzEEgDWzt — Intl. Space Station (@Space_Station) March 3, 2019 As NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine pointed out on Saturday, the SpaceX test represents a "new era" for American space travel. Astronauts in the U.S. have been relying on Russian Soyuz rockets since NASA's fleet was retired in 2011, but those seats are costly. SpaceX's Crew Dragon (and Boeing's similar Starliner capsule) present an alternative, having been developed under NASA's Commercial Crew Program. Space travel is still a costly endeavor, but these capsules were developed in partnership with NASA and the price of a seat is about $ 30 million cheaper. With the successful launch and docking procedure now behind it, only one important test remains for SpaceX's test flight: the return trip. Demo-1 will detach from the ISS on Friday, March 8, and begin the quick journey back to Earth.  It's expected to touch down in the Atlantic Ocean, somewhere off the coast of Florida near Cape Canaveral and the Kennedy Space Center. If that final phase of the test goes well, NASA astronauts could be heading into space aboard non-NASA rockets as soon as summer 2019. WATCH: Elon Musk says Mars round trip could cost only $ 100,000 one day



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Ripley, the SpaceX test dummy, is buckled in and ready for launch

Ripley, the SpaceX test dummy, is buckled in and ready for launchSpace travel is set to take a pivotal step forward this weekend. SpaceX, in the first test demonstration of a commercial crew capsule designed to eventually send astronauts to the International Space Station, plans to launch its Crew Dragon spacecraft on Saturday, March 2, at 2:49 a.m. ET, from NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The commercial spaceflight company has worked closely with NASA engineers to design a capsule that meets the agency's rigorous safety standards. This six-day mission — which carries along a test dummy covered in sensors, nicknamed Ripley — endeavors to blast into space, attach to the space station, and then parachute back down to Earth.  (There will be no humans aboard.) "I’m very comfortable with where we’re headed with this flight. I fully expect we’re going to learn something on this flight. I guarantee you everything will not work exactly right. And that’s cool," Bill Gerstenmaier, the associate administrator for NASA’s human spaceflight program, said during a launch briefing last week,
The Washington Post reports.  We are excited that Ripley, an anthropomorphic test device, will be making the trip to and from @Space_Station. She is outfitted with many sensors to provide teams detailed information to further understand the effects on future crew members who will be traveling in Crew Dragon. t.co/yo19LYZwCy — NASA Commercial Crew (@Commercial_Crew) March 1, 2019 "… We want to maximize our learning so we can get the stuff ready so when we put crew on we’re ready to go do a real crew mission,” Gerstenmaier said. This launch is the opening gun in a new space race, specifically as part of NASA’s Commercial Crew Program. The program involves NASA working with two partners, SpaceX and Boeing, to build revolutionary spacecraft to bring astronauts to the space station and low orbits around Earth.  SEE ALSO: NASA dropped a space exploration robot into Cape Cod’s waters to reach the darkest unknowns The Dragon capsule holding Ripley — which NASA calls an "anthropomorphic test device" — will launch atop SpaceX's reusable Falcon 9 rocket — the same rocket the company uses to launch supplies to the space station.  Unlike Elon Musk's Starman — which SpaceX strapped tightly to a Roadster during last year's sensational test launch of the Falcon Heavy rocket — Ripley serves an engineering purpose. Ripley, donning a sleek white spacesuit, is covered in sensors to measure the vibrations and sound occurring inside the capsule during its high-speed journeys to, around, and back to Earth.  SpaceX and @NASA have completed thousands of hours of tests, analyses, and reviews in preparation for Crew Dragon’s first test flight to the @space_station pic.twitter.com/JvJqeoLKVy — SpaceX (@SpaceX) February 28, 2019 If the early Saturday morning launch goes as planned, the Dragon capsule will dock with the space station at 6:00 a.m. March 3, where it will stay for five days. Then, on Friday, March 8 at around 2:30 a.m. ET, the capsule will leave the space station and some five hours later fall through Earth's atmosphere. Soon after, the spacecraft will deploy four large parachutes to slow down.  NASA expects a gentle splashdown in the Atlantic Ocean off of Cape Canaveral, Florida at around 8:45 a.m. ET.  The U.S. has lacked both a rocket and spaceship to launch astronauts into space since the retirement of the Shuttle program, in 2011. Since then, NASA has had to purchase pricey seats aboard Russia's Soyuz rocket, which cost $ 81 million per seat. The Demo-1 Flight Readiness Review has concluded. The Board set March 2 at 2:48 a.m. EST as the official launch date for @SpaceX's flight to @Space_Station. #LaunchAmerica t.co/2DIJ99guG2 pic.twitter.com/86lV29gVNS — NASA Commercial Crew (@Commercial_Crew) February 22, 2019 Acknowledging that there may be delays with the SpaceX and Boeing crew capsules, NASA has purchased two more future seats aboard the Soyuz rockets, one in 2019 and one in 2020, Space News reports. But when SpaceX and Boeing's spacecraft do start carrying real passengers — not test dummies — the price for a ride into space will fall considerably, to around $ 58 million per seat, NASA said.  WATCH: This "horror" was spotted off the coast of the Carolinas



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Elizabeth Warren apologizes to Cherokee leaders over DNA test, reports say

Elizabeth Warren apologizes to Cherokee leaders over DNA test, reports sayThe apology comes just days before Elizabeth Warren is set to make an announcement about whether she will run for president in 2020.



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Kamala Harris's charmed political life is about to face its biggest test

Kamala Harris's charmed political life is about to face its biggest testKamala Harris has been considered a potential presidential candidate almost from the day she entered politics as a district attorney. Now that her campaign is actually underway, how will she perform under the microscope of the national press?



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Boeing's flying taxi takes to the skies in its first test flight

Boeing's flying taxi takes to the skies in its first test flightA self-flying air taxi built by one of the world's biggest defence and aerospace giants has lifted off on its maiden test flight in the US. Boeing revealed its autonomous air passenger vehicle (PAV), which the US company hopes will be a contender for future flying taxi services. The PAV uses electric vertical takeoff and landing technology, meaning it could fly in constricted urban areas. The test saw a controlled takeoff, hover and landing and tested the flying taxi's autonomous functions and landing systems. “In one year, we have progressed from a conceptual design to a flying prototype,” said Boeing Chief Technology Officer Greg Hyslop.  The aircraft comes as part of Boeing's future-gazing NeXt division, its research arm developing autonomous and electric aircraft. The test flight comes as tech companies vie to launch flying taxi and autonomous drone services for human passengers and package delivery. FAQ | Drones Uber has said it aims to have a flying taxi service in place by next year, launching a pilot version of the service in Dallas and Dubai. It is also exploring bringing its flying taxis further afield, with Japan, France, Brazil, Australia and India up for consideration for its uberAIR service. Amazon, meanwhile, has been testing  autonomous flying drones as part of its Amazon Air delivery service. Amazon Air would see package carrying drones deposit goods in remote locations by air. The pilot has been tested in Cambridge. Meanwhile Boeing, better known for its commercial jets and military aircraft, has been developing the PAV since 2018. For now, the aircraft has a flying range of just 50 miles. It measures 30 feet by 28 feet. Boeing has also developed an autonomous electric flying drone, which can carry up to 225kg, which is designed for delivering packages in hard to reach areas. It completed indoor testing last year and will transition to outdoor flights in 2019.



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Israel, US test ballistic missile interceptor

Israel, US test ballistic missile interceptorThe Israeli and US defence ministries said Tuesday they had successfully tested ballistic missile interceptors deployed at Israeli airbases. The tests came a day after the latest deadly exchange of fire between Israel and Iranian forces operating in Syria. The Arrow 3 interceptor system, designed to shoot down missiles above the atmosphere, was deployed at air force bases across Israel two years ago.



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