Tag Archives: tell

Floridians Tell Politicians Who Do The NRA’s Bidding Their Time Is Up

Floridians Tell Politicians Who Do The NRA’s Bidding Their Time Is UpFORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. ― Something powerful is happening in Florida.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Vegas shooting victim's husband says wife visited him in dream to tell him not to take her off life support

Vegas shooting victim's husband says wife visited him in dream to tell him not to take her off life supportA husband whose wife was critically injured during the Las Vegas shooting on October 1 says she visited him in a dream and told him everything would be okay.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Cable News Chyrons Tell The Bizarre Story Of Trump's First Year In Office

Cable News Chyrons Tell The Bizarre Story Of Trump's First Year In OfficeDonald Trump has officially completed one full year as president, and holy moly what a year it’s been.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Twitter users tell FCC chair Ajit Pai to 'kill himself' after net neutrality vote

Twitter users tell FCC chair Ajit Pai to 'kill himself' after net neutrality voteFederal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai is facing backlash online after the government agency voted  Thursday to repeal landmark Obama-era rules that were designed to ensuring a free and open internet, setting up a court fight over a move that could recast the digital landscape The plan had not been popular leading up to the vote, with at least one poll from the University of Maryland finding more than 80 percent of respondents opposed the proposed repeal of net neutrality rules ahead of the vote.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Trump supporters tell Jimmy Kimmel why they want Hillary Clinton 'impeached'

Trump supporters tell Jimmy Kimmel why they want Hillary Clinton 'impeached'Amid the dizzying amount of criminal allegations surrounding President Trump and Hillary Clinton, "Jimmy Kimmel Live" hit the streets of Los Angeles to ask Trump supporters why they think Clinton should be impeached, although she holds no public office.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Some Of America's Wealthiest Tell Congress To Raise Their Taxes, Not Cut Them

Some Of America's Wealthiest Tell Congress To Raise Their Taxes, Not Cut ThemAmerican millionaires and billionaires are banding together to urge Republicans in Congress to raise their taxes instead of cutting them.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

The photographs that tell the full story of the Rohingya refugee crisis

The photographs that tell the full story of the Rohingya refugee crisisThey arrive ill and exhausted, having walked for days through jungle, rice paddies and mountains, or having braved dangerous sea and river voyages in ramshackle boats. Some of them are newborn, others in their 80s. Not everyone survives the journey. All that do are desperate. Since 25 August, nearly 450,000 refugees have crossed from Burma (also known as Myanmar) into neighbouring Bangladesh, after long-running tensions between Rohingya Muslims and the predominantly Buddhist Burmese population erupted into violence in the remote western state of Rakhine. By the time you read this, that already staggering figure will have increased. The United Nations, which has described the violence driving the Rohingya from a territory they have lived in for centuries as ‘a textbook example of ethnic cleansing’, estimates many thousands are still arriving each week. At a glance | Myanmar’s Rohingya people ‘Every day that I was there,’ says American photographer Greg Constantine, who has recently returned from a fortnight in the region, ‘I would look across the border into northern Rakhine and see smoke pouring into the sky. [Burmese government leader] Aung San Suu Kyi claims the clearance operations have stopped, but they haven’t. Every one of those refugees tells  the same story: of mobs and the military torching their homes, killing, raping, terrorising. And the scale of it – I’ve been here more than a dozen times over the last decade, and every time I think, “It can’t get worse than this.” And it does.’ The three makeshift camps the refugees are headed for – Kutupalong, Nayapara and Balukhali – were established 25 years ago. Even before the most recent exodus they housed around 33,000 people, and many more Rohingya have settled in the wider area too. New arrivals sleep in the open until they can build shelters, which mostly consist of bamboo poles and tarpaulin. ‘It’s not even a specific place any more,’ explains Constantine. ‘You drive down the highway from Ukhiya to Teknaf, and it’s just mile upon mile upon mile of huts and people sitting on the side of the road.’ Refugees continue to stream into Bangladesh from Myanmar 00:40 Violence towards the Rohingya isn’t new – it goes back to 1784, when the Burman king Bodawpaya conquered Rakhine and hundreds of thousands of Rohingya were forced to flee to Bengal – but the current crisis is rooted in a belief among many Burmese that the Rohingya, who returned to Rakhine in large numbers during the British occupation of Burma between 1824 and 1948, want to turn Rakhine into a Muslim state.  Constantine, 47, who grew up in Indiana and taught himself photography in his 30s, first began documenting the Rohingya in 2006, as part of a series exploring the plight of the stateless. Nowhere People documents individuals and communities all over the world who have no official citizenship, no documentation and no rights. Rohingya babies, for instance, are not given birth certificates. As adults, they can’t work or go to a doctor or obtain an education. They are regarded as illegal immigrants by the majority of Burma’s citizens and were excluded from the country’s most recent census (which did not allow people to register their identity as Rohingya). ‘The million-dollar question that everyone grapples with is why,’ says Constantine, who has been blacklisted by the Burmese government and banned from re-entering the country. I would look across the border into northern Rakhine and see smoke pouring into the sky. Aung San Suu Kyi claims the clearance operations have stopped, but they haven’t ‘I’ve always believed that what is at the heart of it is a deep-rooted racism. Is there a solution? Not unless things change inside Myanmar, and not just at a political level. The international community can put all the pressure it wants on the government but change has to happen among the attitudes of the citizenry for things to even begin heading in the right direction.’ Until then, Constantine says, he will keep going back to the camps. ‘I realised, somewhere along the way over these last 10 years, that what I was doing had changed from reporting on specific events to creating a timeline of slow violence towards a community. I want to show that what is happening now is something that has a history behind it. That all of this should have been expected. That we knew.’  The story behind the photographs By photographer Greg Constantine Credit: Greg Constantine  Hundreds of thousands of Rohingya have flooded into southern Bangladesh over the past month after violence erupted in the Burmese state of Rakhine. The north-south highway between the Bangladeshi cities of Teknaf  and Cox’s Bazar  is a steady flow of refugees. Credit: Greg Constantine  A middle-class Bangladeshi tosses small notes of currency into the air for young Rohingya children. At certain moments I get so incredibly frustrated with human beings. This was one of those situations. I couldn’t help but photograph it. He might have had the best intentions, but what he was doing was degrading. He wasn’t approaching  these people as human beings. You see it happening a lot in the camps: well-intentioned people who  aren’t thinking clearly about  the way they go about things. Credit: Greg Constantine  Rohingya women and children sit wherever they can find shelter along the road between Teknaf and Cox’s Bazar. They can be here for weeks before they are able to get a space on the back of a flatbed truck and move on to one of the refugee camps. The cramped journey takes about two hours, with only a tarpaulin for protection from the rain. The last time I made the journey with  a group of them,  it rained the  whole way. Credit: Greg Constantine  These days there are stations in the camps from which humanitarian assistance can be distributed. At any time of day, you see lines of people waiting to get to rice or some other food ration. There are also a lot of intrepid well-wishers, whether Bangladeshi or foreign donors, who drive in in big trucks. It causes these surges of complete mayhem – that’s what you see here. There are maybe 2,000 people swarming around the truck here, and the people distributing the food have to keep order by beating some of them back with sticks. It’s very inhumane in that sense. Credit: Greg Constantine  There’s a huge business in bamboo in the camps – it comes in on trucks almost daily, and this is what people use to build their homes. When I first visited, very little was organised, but things are much more coordinated now. Even when the huts are in the middle of being built, so just skeletons really, people still sleep under them. They have no protection from the elements. When you see the size of the camps, you think, “How many people are actually left in Burma when there are so many people here?”



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Bernie Sanders Slams Trump: 'Let Me Tell You What A Curse On The American People Is'

Bernie Sanders Slams Trump: 'Let Me Tell You What A Curse On The American People Is'Minutes after President Donald Trump tweeted an attack on Bernie Sanders’ “Medicare For All” proposal yesterday, the Vermont senator, in an interview with me on SiriusXM Progress, fired back, slamming the president’s attempt to repeal the Affordable Care Act and his recent decision to end protections for immigrant youth.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Jimmy Carter to Trump: 'Keep the peace … tell the truth'

Jimmy Carter to Trump: 'Keep the peace ... tell the truth'ATLANTA (AP) — Former President Jimmy Carter offered a damning indictment of U.S. foreign policy and domestic affairs Tuesday, saying money in politics makes the nation more like an "oligarchy than a democracy" and casting President Donald Trump as a disappointment on the world stage.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

'France isn't liberal England', hardliners tell Emmanuel Macron, as tens of thousands protest labour reforms

'France isn't liberal England', hardliners tell Emmanuel Macron, as tens of thousands protest labour reformsFrance will not be turned into "liberal England', Emmanuel Macron has been warned, as clashes broke out in protests against loosening labour regulations seen as a key public test of the president's reformist resolve. Stone-throwing protesters in Paris clashed with police who responded with tear gas as some 4,000 strikes were called around France by the country's biggest public sector trade union, the hardline CGT. Rail workers, students and civil servants were urged to protest in cities from Paris to Toulouse. By mid-afternoon, the CGT had already deemed the protests a "success", with at least 100,000 in force in provincial France and 60,000 in Paris. Police said there were 24,000 protesters in Paris. The numbers were, however, well below protests against another labour reform last year. Hundreds of masked protesters dressed in black clashed with police in Paris, who responded with tear gas and water cannons.  Clashes between police and protesters at demonstration against the French government's labor reforms in Paris Credit: IAN LANGSDON/EPA The reference to Britain came not from the unions but from far-Left firebrand Jean-Luc Mélenchon, who pledged to force Mr Macron to "backtrack" on business-friendly changes to France's labour code, which he recently called a "social coup d'état". "What is going to be a surprise is when he (Macron) ends up giving way," the leader of opposition party France Unbowed told reporters as he joined a protest in the southern port of Marseille.  "This country doesn't want the liberal world… France isn't England," he added. French leader of La France Insoumise far-left coalition Jean-Luc Melenchon (C) speaks with a CGT union's demonstrator during a protest called by several French unions against the labour law reform in Marseille,  southern France, on September 12, 201 Credit:  ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT/AFP Mr Mélenchon, who came fourth in this year's presidential elections, taking 19.6 per cent of around seven million votes sees Mr Macron, an ex-investment banker, as an Anglo-Saxon ultra-liberal whose aim is to unpick the French social model. Polls suggest he is currently seen as Mr Macron's most credible opponent, given the parlous state of the mainstream Right and Left. Unions are wary of the charismatic orator stealing their limelight as protest figurehead. They are not best pleased his party is organising a separate march on September 23. Mr Macron, meanwhile was thousands of miles away from the marches visiting hurricane-struck compatriots in the French Caribbean. France's President Emmanuel Macron waits on the tarmac of Pointe-a-Pitre airport, Guadeloupe island, before boarding an helicopter en route to French Caribbean islands of St. Martin and St. Barthelemy Credit: CHRISTOPHE ENA / POOL/ AP POOL He made no mention of the strike protests as he visited the devastated islands of Saint Martin and Saint Barthelemy, where residents are angry at the speed of the rescue effort.  But he will have kept a close eye on the scale of protests today against his business-friendly changes to the labour code. If the reform passes smoothly, it will bode well for a slew of other upcoming reforms on unemployment insurance, professional training and – most controversially – pensions. Protest leaders had hoped that ill-advised comments by Mr Macron apparently likening striking workers to "slackers" would swell the ranks of demonstrations around France. CGT leader Philippe Martinez said he was "scandalised" by the comment. "The president should listen to the people, understand them, rather than cause divisions," Mr Martinez told France 2. This was just "phase one" of protests, he insisted. Another is planned for September 21. Although the reform concerns the private sector, his union called for strikes across transport and other public sector businesses. A CGT union's demonstrator walks amid smoke of flares during a protest called by several French unions against the labour law reform in Rennes on September 12, 2017 Credit: DAMIEN MEYER/AFP CGT workers from the rail, oil and power sectors also heeded his call. Roads into several major cities were blocked and some trains cancelled.  Budget airline Ryanair accused unions of “holding Europe to ransom” after being forced to cancel 110 flights. Furious, its marketing director Kenny Jacobs slammed the French government and European Commission saying: “They cannot stand idly by as more disruption and travel misery is inflicted upon Europe’s consumers and airlines.” Travellers were advised to check its website. Demonstrators, holding CGT labour union flags, attend a national strike and protest against the government's labour reforms in Marseille Credit: JEAN-PAUL PELISSIER/Reuters Some students' unions also called on members to take action. In the early hours of Tuesday, lorries were already blocking Paris' iconic Champs-Elysées and Place de l'Etoile, while staff at the Eiffel Tower were also due to go on strike in the afternoon. In one unexpected development, fairground workers – including the boss who runs the big wheel at Paris' Place de la Concorde – led blockages in Paris and elsewhere, furious at a totally unrelated administrative decree passed in April. A less radical reform of France's labour code sparked huge blockages and sometimes violent protests last year, but the Socialist government stood firm – a sign that the unions no longer have the clout to strong-arm Gallic governments to backtrack. This time, Mr Macron took comfort from the fact that two other unions, Force Ouvrière and the CFDT, the largest in the private-sector, declined to join the protests. However dozens of local units of the normally pugnacious FO ignored their leader's call to stay away and marched regardless.  After weeks of negotiations, the government last month set out measures including a cap on payouts for dismissals judged unfair, and greater freedom for companies to hire and fire. Secretary-General of the General Confederation of Labour (CGT) French worker's union, Philippe Martinez Credit:  JOEL SAGET/AFP The reform hands firms more flexibility to set pay and working conditions. The government plans to adopt the new measures, being implemented by decree, on Sept. 22. During a trip to Athens on Friday, Macron told French business leaders: "I am fully determined and I won't give any ground, not to slackers, nor cynics, nor hardliners." Bruno Cautres of the Cevipof political research institute said Mr Macron had "thrown oil on the fire" with his choice of words."With the 'slackers' comment, there are all the ingredients for this to heat up," he said. Mr Macron insisted that the term "slackers" referred to those who had failed to push through reforms in the past "in France and Europe", but many viewed it as an attack on the unemployed or on workers on highly-protected staff contracts. In Bordeaux, protesters chanted: "Macron you're screwed, the slackers are in the streets" while in Paris others carried placards reading: "Slacker on strike". Asked on Monday if he regretted his comment, he replied: "We cannot move forward if we don't tell it like it is." "It's Macron's style," said Jerome Fourquet of pollster IFOP. "He's not going to back down, make apologies. That carries a risk." The president's stated aim is cut unemployment from 9.5 per cent to 7. 5 per cent by 2022. The reforms are seen in Germany as a test of the French president's resolve to "re-found" the eurozone's second-biggest economy, key if he is to win Berlin's backing for broader reforms to the currency union. An opinion poll published on September 1 indicated that voters have mixed views on the reform. Nearly six in 10 said they opposed Macron's labour decrees overall. But when respondents looked at individual measures, most received majority support. Emmanuel Macron – Satisfaction with French presidents in first 100 days Mr Macron's attempts to push through the changes come as France's economic growth is accelerating, unemployment appears to be falling, and the unions are divided. Finance minister Bruno Le Maire told the newspaper Les Echos that voters had chosen Mr Macron "to carry out the reforms that France has shrunk away from for 30 years".



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines