Tag Archives: Stage

Students Stage Fake Car Wreck for Their Senior Prank

Students Stage Fake Car Wreck for Their Senior PrankIt looked pretty real!



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University of Florida president apologizes for grads being rushed off stage

University of Florida president apologizes for grads being rushed off stageThe school is facing claims of racism after a video showing minority students pushed off stage during their commencement drew outrage on social media.



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Outrage After Celebrating Black Graduates Are Yanked Off College's Stage

Outrage After Celebrating Black Graduates Are Yanked Off College's StageA day of joy and celebration spurred complaints of racism after a college



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Thousands stage anti-Macron protest in Paris

Thousands stage anti-Macron protest in ParisThousands of people demonstrated in central Paris on Saturday amid a heavy police presence to protest against President Emmanuel Macron’s sweeping reforms, a year after he came to office. Smaller rallies took place in the southern cities of Toulouse and Bordeaux while the Paris variant kicked off with a mass picnic which drew numerous families. Organisers had urged participants to attend in a party mood — but the high security owed much to hundreds of black-clad youths having torched cars and a McDonald’s restaurant during traditional May 1 demonstrations in the capital, prompting fears that more “black bloc” protesters could hijack Saturday’s event.



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Stage Set for Trump’s Meeting with Kim Jong Un

Stage Set for Trump’s Meeting with Kim Jong UnThe president shared updates about his forthcoming summit with North Korea’s Kim Jong Un, saying he spoke with the leaders of South Korea and Japan, and that the meeting’s time and location are being set.



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Bride with Stage 4 Cancer Lives to See Wedding Day After Doctors Urged Her to Move Up Ceremony

In September, doctors urged 29-year-old Laurin Bank to move up her wedding date, fearing that the cancer patient wouldn’t live to see March 24. She said “no.”

“This date was special to us,” Bank says of herself and her now-husband Michael. “We felt like moving that date was giving up and giving in to the cancer and letting it run our lives. We didn’t want to give in. That was our goal … and I was able to walk down the aisle to my husband. I was able to dance with him and I didn’t need a wheelchair or oxygen. I did it I made it.”

Bank, of Columbia, South Carolina, was diagnosed with stage two breast cancer in September 2014. She underwent chemotherapy, radiation and a double mastectomy before being declared cancer-free in April 2015.

“When I learned I was cancer free I felt ecstatic,” she tells PEOPLE. “I felt free and that I had gotten my life back. And I was more ready than ever to live my life.”

Michael (left) and Laurin Bank

However, her health took a turn in August 2017 when doctors told Bank her cancer had returned as stage four, and had metastatized to her bones, liver and lungs.

“It’s not news I wanted to hear,” she tells PEOPLE. “I looked at my oncologist and said, ‘quality over quantity. That’s my goal. And if there’s treatment, I want to do it.’ I was ready to fight. I fought once and I knew I could fight again. Being stage four is scary but I’m young, so I have a lot of fight in me.”

Bank began treatment as part of a clinical trial and her health began to improve. But, in September, doctors gave her a fierce warning.

“The oncologist said waiting six more months to get married would be risky. She said she wasn’t sure whether I’d need a wheelchair to get me down the aisle. She said it would be best for us to move up our wedding date. The doctor also said with my lungs not being so strong, I might need oxygen for my wedding day.”

Michael (left) and Laurin Bank

However, she says she and Michael picked March 24 because it’s the anniversary of their first date three years ago.

“Mike looked at me and said, ‘Don’t you dare worry. It’s going to be okay,’ ” says Bank, who chronicles her health journey on her personal blog, The Polka Dot Queen. “We didn’t want to give in to the cancer. We wanted to have [our wedding] on our terms.”

And they did. On March 24, a smiling Bank walked down the aisle, wed Michael and danced energetically in front of 230 of her closest family and friends.

Laurin (left) and Michael Bank

Laurin (left) and Michael Bank

“I danced until the last song of the night,” she says. “The wedding day was the best day ever. I was so shocked that I made it! I felt good and I felt strong. It was an emotional morning. As I walked down the aisle to him, I was just bursting with joy and happiness because I was so excited to marry him.”

Now, Bank says her health is improving and she’s continuing her treatment. She says she and Michael are looking forward to their trip to Italy in September, as they haven’t been able to fly overseas for their honeymoon as a result of Bank’s illness.

“Our goal is to go on our dream honeymoon like we originally planned,” she says. “Until then we’re planning a bunch of mini trips to celebrate and enjoy.”

Michael adds: “I made the decision that I want to be there for her and support her 100 percent. I’m going to support her through this fight.”


www.health.com/syndication/laurin-bank-cancer-wedding-move-ceremony “>
Breast Cancer – Health.com

I Was Diagnosed With Stage 3 Breast Cancer at 28

I was breastfeeding my son Caleb around Christmas 2016 when I felt a lump. I figured it was a clogged milk duct and that it wasn’t a big deal, so I thought I’d wait until things settled down after the holidays to get it checked out. I went for my annual physical in January. I mentioned to my doctor that I’d had this lump for a little while and asked her to check it out.

“This is too big to be a duct,” I remember her saying. “We need to look into it further.”

Still, I didn’t think much of it. I was only 28; I had always thought breast cancer was for older women. I had no reason to think I was at any risk. So I went home and told my husband, “The doctor must be overreacting, but tomorrow I’m going for a mammogram and an ultrasound.”

RELATED: cancer/things-to-know-first-mammogram”>9 Things to Know Before Your First Mammogram

I went to a local non-profit organization that does breast cancer screenings for the tests. The doctor there looked at the results of my mammogram and ultrasound and said I’d need to come back the next day for a biopsy. She told me that I needed to stop nursing Caleb right away.

Caleb is very medically complex. We had tried seemingly every formula in the U.S. and even some we’d had shipped from overseas, but he couldn’t stomach anything enough to thrive. Probably 75% of his diet was breast milk, so he was very reliant on me. Hearing that I had to wean him was when all the emotions hit: This could be something really serious. What would we do for him?

I had gone to my physical on a Tuesday. On Friday, I was diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer, meaning it had spread to my lymph nodes. That’s how quickly I went from thinking this was no big deal to getting thrown into a cancer diagnosis.

RELATED: What to Do After a Breast Cancer Diagnosis, According to Women Who Have Been There

Fighting for my life–and my family

As a family, we were about to start fighting for my life—but we had Caleb to think of too. I remember my doctor saying, “If you’re going to be here for him, you really do have to wean him now.” I did, with no real plan, just taking things day by day and using the formula that worked best for him. His doctors fought harder to find a diagnosis for him because they no longer had me to rely on. He did get a diagnosis and then medication; now he’s thriving, which helped me relax a little.

I was tested for genetic mutations and the results came back positive for the BRCA2 gene mutation. I knew my grandmother had breast cancer in her 60s, which I thought of as the typical age for the disease. I’m not very close to that side of my family, but I called her to tell her about my diagnosis, and I found out she had several cousins who also had breast cancer. If I would have known about my family history, maybe I would have been a little more proactive, but my diagnosis came out of the blue for me.

Within a couple weeks, I started chemo. After the tumor shrank from the chemo, I had surgery, followed by radiation. Now I’m doing immunotherapy until September. Chemo was terrible. I was stuck in my bed most of the time. My mom, dad, and sister live a block away, so they were at our house helping us every day. My husband has a great boss who had gone through cancer himself. He understood that when my husband needed to go home, he needed to go home. The support from our family and our community was huge.

Talking to my kids about cancer

Besides Caleb, we have another special-needs son, and just days after my surgery my daughter had an accident that took about six months of recovery. Honestly, I don’t even know how to describe the emotions. For a while, it felt like we were fighting every day to wake up in the morning and remind ourselves we could make it another day.

The whole time, my husband and I were open and honest with our kids—now 7, 5, and almost 3. One of my biggest fears when I was diagnosed was how to tell them. What if you say it the wrong way and scare them? My husband and I talked to our pediatrician and the social worker at MD Anderson Cancer Center, where I was getting treated.

With Caleb in the hospital a lot that year too, we didn’t want to say, “Mommy’s going to the hospital.” We didn’t want the kids to look at him and think he would have to do chemo or come back with no hair too. We didn’t want them to associate his hospital visits with cancer.

We said things like, “Mommy has cancer,” instead of, “Mommy is sick,” and “Mommy’s going to MD Anderson for chemo,” instead of, “Mommy’s going to the hospital.” We even said, “Mommy’s going to the oncologist”—we made sure we used the correct terms.

My kids knew I was sick, but they knew it was temporary. We gave them a goal: What do you want to do when Mommy’s done with treatment? Of course, they said Disney World. It’s a little expensive for us—now my husband and I look at each other like, “Uh oh, we promised, what are we going to do?” But we’ll make it work.

Getting my energy back

I had some scar tissue from the surgery to remove my lymph nodes, so I started physical therapy. I told the therapist how tired I felt, how I used to go on long walks with my kids and now I didn’t have the strength. Chemo wears you out so much. She made me an appointment to join the MD Anderson Healthy Heart program, which focuses on improving heart health and fitness in cancer patients and survivors. I thought it sounded great, like something that could really help me get my life back the way it had been before cancer.

I was given a Fitbit to track my weekly workouts. The doctor who runs the program helped me set goals that fit in with my schedule and also satisfied what she wanted from me. It was eye-opening at first to see how difficult it was to just find 30 minutes for myself three times a week. I was giving so much to the whole family and not taking care of myself. Sometimes I get my exercise on my own when my husband can watch the kids; other times, we’ll do something together as a family, like walk the trails at a local wildlife reserve. I’m going to get my energy and my life back.

RELATED: The Best Foods for Cancer Patients

My kids want every minute with me now that I’m feeling good. They were so used to going out all day together on Saturdays for bike rides or to parks before my diagnosis. But when I was sick, even just reading a book or watching a favorite show with popcorn in bed was a treat, and somehow they saw it as just as exciting. Even if you do something little, it means a lot to kids. Just the other day, my older son said, “Mom, remember that time you let us eat popcorn in your bed? Remember how fun that was?” I was fearful they lost out on so much during my treatment, but they didn’t.

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I want other women going through cancer treatment and recovery to enjoy those little moments. When something is almost taken away from you, you realize how important just rocking your kids to sleep or reading a book to them is. You might be scared to ask for help, but it’s okay to have somebody pick up your laundry or bring you dinner. It’s hard to get to that place, but it’s something you have to do. Remember to make special memories, even in pajamas and with no hair.


www.health.com/breast-cancer/ashley-rivera-breast-cancer “>
Breast Cancer – Health.com

In Turkey's Kurdish heartland, anger over Syria war finds a stage

In Turkey's Kurdish heartland, anger over Syria war finds a stageBy Daren Butler DIYARBAKIR, Turkey (Reuters) – Tens of thousands of Turkish Kurds turned an annual cultural festival into a rare mass political protest on Wednesday against the government’s two-month-old military campaign against a Kurdish militia in neighboring Syria. At a rally to mark the spring festival of Newroz in the southern city of Diyarbakir, demonstrators said Ankara risked provoking violence at home if it pressed on with its Syria offensive. The event was the first major public demonstration against the campaign in Syria, in which the Turkish army has battled a Kurdish militia, the YPG, which Turkey says is an extension of the banned PKK, or Kurdistan Workers Party.



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Students across U.S. stage national walkout month after Parkland massacre

Students across U.S. stage national walkout month after Parkland massacreStudents and teachers at more than 2,000 schools across the country staged a national walkout to call for an end to gun violence on Wednesday, one month after 17 people were killed in a mass shooting a Florida high school.



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Oscars 2018: Harvey Weinstein's accusers and Me Too movement take centre stage

Oscars 2018: Harvey Weinstein's accusers and Me Too movement take centre stageThe Me Too movement stole the spotlight at the Oscars on Sunday night, with three of Harvey Weinstein's accusers promoting the campaign on stage. Actresses Ashley Judd, Annabella Sciorra and Salma Hayek came out to introduce a montage that celebrated diversity in cinematic storytelling – including gender and race. First, they each referred to the reckoning that has occurred since the Weinstein story broke last October, launching the £MeToo and Time's Up movements. Judd, whose accusations appeared in the first New York Times article about Weinstein, spoke about "new voices, different voices, OUR voices." She then shouted, "Time's Up!" Voices in the segment included Ava DuVernay, Greta Gerwig, Kumail Nunjiani, Barry Jenkins, Geena Davis and Mira Sorvino. Ashley Judd (L) and Mira Sorvino arrive for the 90th Annual Academy Awards  The Me Too movement, which was also a key subject in Jimmy Kimmel's opening monologue, had arrived in style on the Oscars red carpet in the form of campaign pins. The issue of sexual harassment has hovered over the film industry for months. And its presence was felt even during the year’s biggest Hollywood celebration, as Judd said it marked a time when everyone was listening to women. "What's so spectacular about this moment is that finally the world is able to hear," she said. Much of the change, she added, was that the shame of being a victim had now been transferred to perpetrators, in a movement that had moved beyond Hollwood. "And us being the phoenixes who can light the way not only with Hollywood but for safe and equitable workplaces across all spaces and all sectors," she added. Oscars 2018: The most glamorous looks from the red carpet Sorvino said she wanted people to know the movement will not stop until "we have an equitable and safe world for women". Weinstein, 65, has been accused of sexual assault and harassment by about 100 women. He denies all allegations of non-consensual sex. He always known as one of the big figures of Oscar night. He may have been absent but this time around he was represented by a life-size golden statue seated on a "casting couch" just down Hollywood boulevard. There was also additional scrutiny of Ryan Seacrest, who hosted some of E!’s coverage after his former stylist accused him of sexual harassment. He denies the accusations and his presence was a vote of confidence in him by E! And the ceremony itself is reportedly breaking from tradition with as many as four female Oscar winners presenting awards. Christopher Plummer  also appeared after being  nominated for best supporting actor for his role in All The Money In The World, coming in as a last-minute replacement for  Kevin Spacey.  It meant many scenes had to be reshot. Oscars | Gender imbalance He told ABC: "In the theatre, this happens all the time, I've spent my life on stage so it's not a strange coincidence to replace someone and only have nine days to get ready, it was like old times. "Sometimes it's great to have that little space, you don't talk about it, you don't indulge yourself, there's no time, you give a more accurate and hopefully more vulnerable performance." The Shape Of Water leads the nominations with 13, including best picture and best director.



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