Tag Archives: skin

Post-Thanksgiving skin pampering treatments

Post-Thanksgiving skin pampering treatmentsOverindulged this Thanksgiving? Make it up to your skin with these luxurious treatments.



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Nail biting habit allegedly causes skin cancer

Nail biting habit allegedly causes skin cancerA 20-year-old Australian woman has to have her thumb amputated after her nail biting habit causes a rare form of skin cancer.



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US trophy-hunters import thousands of bones and skin parts from imperilled giraffes each year

US trophy-hunters import thousands of bones and skin parts from imperilled giraffes each yearThe US is allowing the import of tens of thousands of parts each year from endangered giraffes killed for their skin and bones. A populations plummet in Africa, investigators discovered that 40,000 pieces of skin and bone from the creatures were imported into America. The Humane Society of the United States said that the body parts were turned into pillows, knife handles, bible covers, gun-case covers, boots and other trinkets.



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Ex-Houston Texans Cheerleader Claims Coach Duct-Taped Her to Appear Thinner: 'My Skin Was Being Torn'

Ex-Houston Texans Cheerleader Claims Coach Duct-Taped Her to Appear Thinner: 'My Skin Was Being Torn'Angelina Rosa is one of six Texans cheerleaders who are suing the team.



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Baby Boy, 1, With Rare Skin Condition Has to Bathe in Bleach: 'It Is Something I Dread'

Baby Boy, 1, With Rare Skin Condition Has to Bathe in Bleach: 'It Is Something I Dread'He has defied the odds for his condition.



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Who’s getting under Trump’s skin today? Lawyers

Who’s getting under Trump’s skin today? LawyersLawyers were very much on Donald Trump’s mind early Sunday morning, as he fired off a couple of tweets ostensibly about his defense in the Russia probe, but with a clear subtext about the profession in general, stopping just short of calling them all crooks who intentionally run up their bills:



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Jupiter's turmoil more than skin deep: researchers

Jupiter's turmoil more than skin deep: researchersJupiter’s tempestuous, gassy atmosphere stretches some 3,000 kilometres (1,860 miles) deep and comprises a hundredth of the planet’s mass, studies based on observations by NASA’s Juno spacecraft revealed Wednesday. The measurements shed the first light on what goes on beneath the surface of the largest planet in the Solar System, which from a distance resembles a colourful, striped glass marble. “Galileo viewed the stripes on Jupiter more than 400 years ago.



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DNA shows first modern Briton had dark skin, blue eyes

DNA shows first modern Briton had dark skin, blue eyesThe first modern Briton had dark skin and blue eyes, London scientists said on Wednesday, following groundbreaking DNA analysis of the remains of a man who lived 10,000 years ago. Known as “Cheddar Man” after the area in southwest England where his skeleton was discovered in a cave in 1903, the ancient man has been brought to life through the first ever full DNA analysis of his remains. In a joint project between Britain’s Natural History Museum and University College London, scientists drilled a 2mm hole into the skull and extracted bone powder for analysis.



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Scientists reveal 10,000-year-old British man had dark skin and blue eyes

Scientists reveal 10,000-year-old British man had dark skin and blue eyesThe face of a 10,000-year-old British skeleton nicknamed "Cheddar Man" has been revealed after research carried out by a team of scientists at London's Natural History Museum. SEE ALSO: Scientists have discovered spiders with tails because nightmares are real The team, which specialises in evolution and DNA, worked with model-makers and professors at University College London to build a picture of what the man behind the skeleton would actually have looked like. It was found in Cheddar Gorge, Somerset back in 1903, hence the name. Here's the skull of Cheddar Man: Part of Cheddar Man's skeleton, found in some caves in the UK over a century ago.Image: the trustees of the natural history museum, londonAnd here's the reconstruction: Scientists found that Cheddar Man would have had a darker skin pigmentation than previously suspected.Image: the trustees of the natural history museum, london“Cheddar Man is one of the oldest human specimens that we’ve worked with, and yet the preservation of DNA has been good enough to recover huge amounts of information about his appearance and ancestry," said Professor Ian Barnes, Research Leader in Ancient DNA at the Natural History Museum, in a press release sent to
Mashable. The method used to recreate Cheddar Man's face is pretty complicated and science-y, but in a nutshell it went something like this: scientists obtained some bone powder by drilling into the skull, which contained enough genetic info to allow them to reconstruct the face; 3D printing technology was then used to construct the head pictured above. “I first studied ‘Cheddar Man’ more than 40 years ago, but could never have believed that we would one day have his whole genome – the oldest British one to date!" said Professor Chris Tringer, Research Lead in Human Origins at the Natural History Museum.  "To go beyond what the bones tell us and get a scientifically-based picture of what he actually looked like is a remarkable (and from the results quite surprising!) achievement.”
Channel 4 are releasing a documentary about Cheddar Man and the reconstruction titled 'First Brit: Secrets of the 10,000 Year Old Man'. It airs Sunday 18 February. WATCH: This graphite skeleton is literally drawing itself to death



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Vets use fish skin to heal bears injured in California wildfires

Vets use fish skin to heal bears injured in California wildfiresWhen two bears suffered painful burns while escaping Southern California's wildfires, veterinarians used an unconventional bandage to treat the animals' paws: fish skin.  The bears, along with a young mountain lion with less severe burns, were treated by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife after the Thomas Fire burned through Santa Barbara and Ventura counties. The wildfires that swept through California in late 2017 were the worst in the state's history. The Thomas Fire was the largest ever recorded, burning through 273,400 acres.  According to a statement by the CDFW, the bears' injuries were severe, with "oozing wounds, and, in some cases, paw pads that were completely burned off." SEE ALSO: Californians band together to save horses from wildfires Deana Clifford, senior wildlife veterinarian at the CDFW, and Jamie Peyton, chief of integrative medicine at the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital at the University of California, Davis treated the animals by using fresh tilapia skin instead of traditional bandages.  Peyton sutured tilapia skin directly onto the bears' paws.Image: California department of fish and wildlifeThey opted to use fish skin because its collagen levels and moisture retention abilities are similar to human skin. Researchers in Brazil have used fish skin, in favor of human skin grafts, to bandage burn victims, but the practice hasn't been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use on humans in the United States. After applying a homemade salve to speed up healing, Peyton and Clifford cut grafts of sterilized tilapia skin and sutured them directly onto the animals' paws while they were under anesthesia. To prevent them from eating the fish skin, they wrapped the animals' paws in corn husks and rice paper. (The mountain lion ended up eating his, anyway.) SEE ALSO: How to help victims of the Southern California wildfires “One of the first things that the bear did was stand up after we applied them,” Peyton said in a statement released by UC Davis. “She was more mobile, which in my mind is a huge success for pain control.” Veterinarians wrapped the animals' paws in corn husks and rice paper to prevent them from eating the fish skin grafts.Image: california department of fish and wildlifeAlthough the animals received three treatments over the course of a month, Peyton told Mashable that the path to recovery was "fraught with more challenges." Unlike with treating domestic pets, it wasn't possible to clean, care, and bandage wounds on a daily basis. She said it was also more difficult to manage their pain with medications, and that they had to deal with "a time crunch to get them back to the wild as soon as possible." "Despite these challenges our therapies helped these animals recover faster than we have noted in some companion animals," Peyton said, "The use of the tilapia skin bandages made a remarkable difference in their pain control and healing ability." The bears also received acupuncture, which has been administered to pets for years. Peyton said the treatment was similar to that given to dogs and cats. "The principles of pain management and wound healing are similar across many species," she said.  One of the bears shortly before she was released back into the wild.Image: California department of fish and wildlifeTo complicate recovery even more, the doctors discovered that one of the bears was pregnant during a routine ultrasound.  “That was a game changer for us, because we knew it wouldn’t be ideal for her to give birth in confinement,” Clifford said in CDFW's statement. “We aren’t really set up to have a birth at the lab holding facilities, and we knew there was a high probability that she could reject the cub, due to all the stress she was under. We needed to get her back into the wild as quickly as possible.” The CDFW team built winter dens so the bears could wake up in safety.Image: california department of fish and wildlifeSince the bears' natural habitats were destroyed during the fire, officials from the CDFW built winter dens for each of the animals to sleep in and be protected from danger. The team released them into the wild on Wednesday and plan on monitoring the rest of their recovery via satellite.  Peyton doesn't see fish skin becoming a standard treatment for human burn victims in the United States because there are multiple skin graft banks that have the resources to treat patients. However, she does believe there may be more demand for alternatives like tilapia skin in countries with fewer banks and less readily available resources. "I think we definitely need more research in this area to determine if it will be used more extensively in people," Peyton said. "Based on what we have seen in these animals, there is potential for this to be a more commonly used therapy in the future." WATCH: Coating yourself in fish scales could be the answer to burn recovery



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