Tag Archives: seriously

Russia's Missiles Can't Take the Heat (Seriously)

Russia's Missiles Can't Take the Heat (Seriously)They don't work like they're supposed to in the scorching Middle East.



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'I've never had a crystal': Marianne Williamson demands to be taken seriously

'I've never had a crystal': Marianne Williamson demands to be taken seriouslyMarianne Williamson wants you to know she’s not a “crystal woo woo lady.”



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Tourist seriously burned after falling into thermal water at Old Faithful

Tourist seriously burned after falling into thermal water at Old FaithfulA man visiting Yellowstone National Park sustained severe burns on Sunday after he fell into the thermal water at the Old Faithful geyser.Cade Edmond Siemers, 48, told park rangers that he went out walking without a flashlight, and ended up tripping and falling, landing in the thermal water, NBC News reports. Siemers, a U.S. citizen living in India, was seriously burned all over his body, and is now receiving treatment at a burn center in Idaho.The National Park Service said on Monday that rangers discovered Siemers' hat and shoe and a beer can by Old Faithful, as well as footprints going to and from the geyser. There are signs all around the park telling people to be careful and take notice of their surroundings, and rangers are now looking to see if any damage was done to the geyser cone. Once the investigation is complete, the results will be "forwarded to the United States Attorney's Office for prosecutorial review," the National Park Service said.



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Teens are pledging not to have kids until the government takes climate change seriously

Teens are pledging not to have kids until the government takes climate change seriouslyEmma Lim, an 18-year-old student at McGill University in Montreal, recently launched a climate-change movement called "NoFutureNoChildren."



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How much destruction is needed for us to take climate change seriously?

How much destruction is needed for us to take climate change seriously?Whether human civilization stays intact amid this worsening weather depends on recognizing our shared humanity – and designing policy accordingly‘We have more than enough money to fight the climate crisis, at home and abroad. It’s just going to all the wrong places.’ Photograph: Noaa/AFP/Getty ImagesNews of Hurricane Dorian’s first casualty came early on Monday morning from the Bahamas Press. A seven-year old boy named Lachino Mcintosh drowned as his family attempted to find safer ground than their home on the Abaco islands. Dorian is reportedly the strongest hurricane to have ever hit the Bahamas and the second most powerful Atlantic storm on record. Five deaths have been reported so far, and more are likely. The Bahamian MP and minister of foreign affairs, the Honorable Darren Henfield, offered a bleak update form the area he represents to reporters: “We have reports of casualties, we have reports of bodies being seen.”Rising temperatures don’t make hurricanes more frequent, but they do help make them more devastating. Each of the last five years have seen Category 5 storms pass through the Atlantic, brewed over hotter than usual waters. How many more people have to die before political leaders treat climate change like the global catastrophe it is?Donald Trump has been rightly criticized for golfing as Dorian devastated the Bahamas and drifted toward the US. But it’s as good a metaphor as any for the way elites across political lines have approached the crisis they have helped create and continue to fuel. One of the cruelest realities of global warming is that the people whohave done the least to contribute to it tend to be among the first and worst hit. Nations like the United States have amassed tremendous wealth both by burning fossil fuels and exploiting land and labor from the places most threatened by rising temperatures through slavery, colonialism and their living legacies. Similar inequalities play out within nations, including in the US, where most people’s own carbon footprints are dwarfed by those of the billionaires and fossil fuel executives best equipped to insulate themselves from heavy weather.Internationally, climate-vulnerable countries have for decades made the case that more ambition is needed, focusing policymakers’ concerns on to issues of equity. The Bahamas is part of a group within the UN known as the Alliance of Small Island States (Aosis), comprising countries already being hammered by climate impacts who have got comparatively few financial resources to deal with them. The Aosis chair and Maldives energy minister, Thoriq Ibrahim, argued at COP 24 last year that it would “be suicide not to use every lever of power we have to demand what is fair and just: the support we need to manage a crisis that has been thrust upon us”.That support has not been forthcoming. In its special report released last year, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change found that keeping warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius – a level already dangerous for low-lying states – would require an annual investment in decarbonization of $ 3tn through 2050. And that’s just to mitigate warming. Trillions more will be required to adapt to the climate impacts already locked in, ensuring that when hurricanes like Dorian do hit they do less damage. Repairing the loss and damage of storms and other disasters is expected to cost $ 300bn a year by 2030, jumping to $ 1.2tn a year by 2060. As the world’s largest historical emitter of greenhouse gases and its biggest economy, the United States has both the ability and an outsized responsibility to decarbonize rapidly and make it possible for countries do the same – a climate debt.Back in 2009, industrialized nations pledged to mobilize $ 100bn toward mitigation and adaptation efforts by 2020, a response to persistent demands from climate justice organizers. As of last September, only $ 3.5bn had actually been allocated to the fund and just $ 10.3bn pledged to the multilateral body that’s supposed to be the main vehicle for dispersing that money, the Green Climate Fund (GCF). Before he left office, Obama promised $ 3bn toward the GCF. Just $ 1bn of that ever materialized before Trump withdrew that vow. That’s a fraction of the estimated $ 15bn a year the federal government spends subsidizing fossil fuel development. At the end of August, the US Import-Export Bank approved $ 5bn in financing for a natural gas project in Mozambique. We have more than enough money to fight the climate crisis, at home and abroad. It’s just going to all the wrong places.Greenhouse gases don’t fit neatly within borders. Efforts to curb them can’t either. Like other wealthy countries, the US has a responsibility to pay its fair share for the damage it’s caused to the planet – not through predatory loans or disastrously managed charity but through solidarity. Bernie Sanders’ plan for a Green New Deal pledges $ 200bn to the GCF, makes climate a centerpiece of American trade and foreign policy and ends fossil fuel financing through institutions like the Import-Export Bank. An extensive, recently released blueprint of a Green New Deal for Europe lays out a rapid and just transition away from fossil fuels, accounting for the emissions rich countries export abroad through trade and the need for a thoroughly democratic response to the climate crisis that doesn’t let the governments who have engineered this crisis call all the shots on how the world handles it.It’ll be tempting, as Dorian drifts toward Florida, for observers in the US to forget the death and destruction it has left behind elsewhere. That would be a mistake. Jeff Bezos’s escape plans notwithstanding, we’re all stuck on this warming planet together. Whether human civilization stays intact amid all this worsening weather depends on recognizing our shared humanity – and designing policy accordingly. Platitudes for the planet won’t cut it. * Kate Aronoff is a freelance journalist covering climate change and US politics



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UPDATE 2-Trump says he is seriously looking at ending birthright citizenship

UPDATE 2-Trump says he is seriously looking at ending birthright citizenshipU.S. President Donald Trump said on Wednesday that his administration was seriously looking at ending the right of citizenship for U.S.-born children of noncitizens and people who immigrated to the United States illegally. “We’re looking at that very seriously, birthright citizenship, where you have a baby on our land, you walk over the border, have a baby – congratulations, the baby is now a U.S. citizen. … It’s frankly ridiculous,” Trump told reporters outside the White House.



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Trump says he is seriously looking at ending birthright citizenship

Trump says he is seriously looking at ending birthright citizenshipU.S. President Donald Trump said on Wednesday that his administration was seriously looking at ending the right of citizenship for U.S.-born children of noncitizens and people who immigrated to the United States illegally. “We’re looking at that very seriously, birthright citizenship, where you have a baby on our land, you walk over the border, have a baby – congratulations, the baby is now a U.S. citizen. … It’s frankly ridiculous,” Trump told reporters outside the White House.



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Trump Claims He Is ‘Seriously’ Considering Ending Birthright Citizenship for Children of Illegal Immigrants

Trump Claims He Is ‘Seriously’ Considering Ending Birthright Citizenship for Children of Illegal ImmigrantsPresident Trump said Wednesday that he is “seriously” considering issuing an executive order to end birthright citizenship for the children of illegal immigrants.Speaking to reporters outside the White House, Trump argued that it is “frankly ridiculous” that the U.S. affords citizenship to babies born to immigrants who entered the country illegally.“We’re looking at that very seriously, birthright citizenship, where you have a baby on our land — you walk over the border and have a baby,” Trump told reporters. “Congratulations, the baby is now a U.S. citizen. We’re looking at it very, very seriously. I don’t know how you found that out, but that’s very good. We are looking at birthright citizenship very seriously.”Wednesday's comments represent the second instance in which Trump has publicly criticized birthright citizenship, particularly as it relates to the children of recent illegal immigrants, whom Trump has described as “anchor babies” on numerous occasions.Trump told Axios in October 2018 that he planned to issue an executive order curtailing birthright citizenship, but never followed through. “We're the only country in the world where a person comes in and has a baby, and the baby is essentially a citizen of the United States . . . with all of those benefits,” he said. “It's ridiculous. It's ridiculous. And it has to end.”Any attempt to restrict birthright citizenship through an executive order would likely face stiff legal challenges and might ultimately require a constitutional amendment — a point Trump disputed during the Axios interview.



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'Let's see them aliens': The Facebook group is a joke, but the Pentagon takes plans to storm Area 51 seriously

'Let's see them aliens': The Facebook group is a joke, but the Pentagon takes plans to storm Area 51 seriouslyThe truth is out there — or at least that's the belief the viral, and farcical, Facebook event "Storm Area 51" is peddling.



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Jamie Dimon Says He Didn't Seriously Consider Running for President

Jamie Dimon Says He Didn't Seriously Consider Running for President“I tell people, I thought that I should think about it,” Dimon said Thursday, drawing laughs from the audience at a Council on Foreign Relations event in New York. CNBC reported earlier in the day that Dimon spent much of 2018 mulling a possible run for president.



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