Tag Archives: seal

'45 is a puppet': Can you spot the mistakes in the fake presidential seal behind Trump?

'45 is a puppet': Can you spot the mistakes in the fake presidential seal behind Trump?A doctored presidential seal with a double-headed eagle holding golf clubs was displayed before President Trump gave a speech on Tuesday.



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Trump appears in front of altered presidential seal saying '45 is a puppet'

Trump appears in front of altered presidential seal saying '45 is a puppet'Trump walked onstage in front of a presidential seal that appears to have been altered to include symbols representing Russia and golf.



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The Latest: Navy SEAL sentenced for posing with dead captive

The Latest: Navy SEAL sentenced for posing with dead captiveA military jury sentenced a decorated Navy SEAL to four months of confinement for posing with the body of an Islamic State captive in Iraq, but a judge credited him with enough days to ensure he won’t be locked up. The jury Wednesday also reduced the rank of Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher by one grade to petty officer 1st class and ordered his monthly pay to be cut by $ 2,697 for four months. The judge went on to give Gallagher 60 days’ credit for being held in overly harsh conditions before being tried as well as for being deprived of treatment for a traumatic brain injury.



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Trump 'glad to help' Navy SEAL acquitted of murder

Trump 'glad to help' Navy SEAL acquitted of murderUS President Donald Trump on Wednesday congratulated a US Navy Seal who was acquitted of murder in a war crimes trial, and took credit for helping. A military court in California cleared Edward Gallagher, 40, Tuesday of the murder of a teenage Islamic State group prisoner in 2017 in Iraq as well as other serious charges related to the case. Gallagher was found guilty only of posing with the slain fighter’s body in a group picture with other SEALs, a charge that carries a much lighter sentence.



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Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher’s Acquittal Reminds Us to Never Rush to Judgment

Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher’s Acquittal Reminds Us to Never Rush to JudgmentWhen I have a chance to speak to students, one of the questions I’m most frequently asked is whether my life experience has caused me to change any of my deeply held political views. I have a ready answer: I’ve transitioned firmly from a law-and-order Republican to a civil libertarian, and the constitutional value I hold every bit as dear as the rights to free speech and free exercise of religion is the right to due process of law. A person’s liberty is precious, law enforcement is far more fallible than I wanted to believe, and social-media kangaroo courts are no substitute for the evidentiary rigor of a court of law.These realities were affirmed yesterday, when a military jury found Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher not guilty of first-degree murder (he allegedly killed an ISIS prisoner in Iraq) and attempted murder (he allegedly sniped at Iraqi civilians).Gallagher’s case achieved public prominence with the publication of a detailed New York Times report in April, which chronicled his alleged crimes and claimed that Navy officers and senior enlisted sailors had warned SEALs who served under Gallagher against blowing the whistle on him.The claims against Gallagher were of the utmost seriousness. He was accused of stabbing a teenaged ISIS prisoner in cold blood, bragging about the murder in a text message, and posing for a picture with the corpse. He was also accused of targeting and shooting civilians, including a young girl, with no conceivable military justification. These claims were part of a Navy report that the Times said painted a “disturbing picture of a subculture within the SEALs that prized aggression, even when it crossed the line, and that protected wrongdoers.”With that report dominating the narrative, Twitter exploded in indignation when the media reported Trump was considering a series of pardons of convicted and alleged war criminals, including Gallagher. I thought former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Martin Dempsey put the case against such a move well at the time:> Absent evidence of innocence or injustice the wholesale pardon of US servicemembers accused of war crimes signals our troops and allies that we don’t take the Law of Armed Conflict seriously. Bad message. Bad precedent. Abdication of moral responsibility. Risk to us. Leadership> > — GEN(R) Marty Dempsey (@Martin_Dempsey) May 21, 2019But Dempsey’s tweet contained a key qualification – “absent evidence of innocence or injustice.” So, in response to the reports, I began to research two of the most high-profile potential pardons: Gallagher’s and those of the men of Raven 23, a Blackwater convoy that engaged in an infamous shootout in Baghdad’s Nisour Square. I focused initially on Raven 23 and after extensive review of the record concluded that a pardon was justified. The members of the convoy had been subject to an extraordinary injustice.I also spoke to individuals with deep knowledge of Gallagher’s case, and I had an immediate thought: He may not need a pardon. The individuals I spoke to pointed to flaws in the prosecution’s case. Evidence that Gallagher sniped civilians was nonexistent. The evidence showed that rather than killing the ISIS prisoner, Gallagher had tried to save his life. And the claims against him were brought by SEALs who resented his leadership and were acting out of a vendetta against him.Then, during the trial, something unexpected happened. Another SEAL testified that he was the real killer. SEAL medic Corey Scott told the stunned courtroom that he’d killed the prisoner as an act of mercy, believing that otherwise the man would’ve been tortured and killed by Iraqi forces. It was the kind of moment you see on television, not in real court cases, and it infuriated prosecutors. They claimed “that in six different interviews with Navy investigators, [Scott] had never hinted that he had suffocated the captive. They said he changed his story after receiving the grant of immunity.”The jury of five Marines, one Naval officer, and one SEAL deliberated for roughly eight hours before finding Gallagher not guilty on every count but one — the charge of taking a picture with the dead ISIS terrorist. Gallagher had not contested that charge, and given his extended pretrial detention, he’s not likely to face any additional jail time for it. He may still face administrative punishment from the Navy, but he will almost certainly go free.To be clear, I’m not arguing that the trial verdict proves Gallagher’s virtue as a SEAL, but that wasn’t the question at issue in the case. Instead, it was yet another example of the reality that cases that can seem compelling at first glance often collapse under scrutiny.As a former JAG officer who dealt with war-crimes claims in an intense, deployed environment, I understand the moral imperative of granting servicemembers the right to a trial by a jury of their peers. In this case, combat veterans weighed charges against another combat veteran and found them wanting.Tomorrow, as you celebrate our Independence Day, raise a glass to our Constitution, which grants accused men and women a fair chance to contest the most serious claims against them. Among the blessings of liberty, few are more precious than the right to due process. Juries aren’t infallible, and due process does not always result in perfect justice, but no nation is truly free without this vital check on the power of the state.



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Timeline: 'Sewing Circle' to murder case against Navy SEAL

Timeline: 'Sewing Circle' to murder case against Navy SEALThe case against Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher, a sniper and medic accused of stabbing to death a wounded Islamic State fighter, caused fissures in the normally cohesive and secretive community of Navy SEALS, some of the world’s best trained troops who often are called on for the most difficult assignments in Iraq, Afghanistan and other places. Other SEALS were responsible for providing incriminating information that led to a formal investigation that produced murder and other charges against Gallagher. Just before the trial began, President Donald Trump considered a pardon for Gallagher but demurred as critics said it would undermine the military justice system.



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Navy SEAL Edward Gallagher Found Not Guilty of Murdering Teen ISIS Prisoner

Navy SEAL Edward Gallagher Found Not Guilty of Murdering Teen ISIS PrisonerHandout/ReutersA decorated Navy SEAL accused of several war crimes—including fatally stabbing a teenage Islamic State prisoner in 2017—was found not guilty of murder on Tuesday. Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher, 39, was cleared of the most serious charges against him—including murder and attempted murder—but the seven-person jury found him guilty of wrongfully posing for an unofficial picture with a human casualty. Gallagher, who reportedly faces a maximum sentence of four months behind bars, was expected to walk out of the courtroom Tuesday afternoon alongside his wife. He has already served 201 days.Marc Mukasey, one of his defense attorneys, told reporters outside the courtroom that Gallagher had “tears of joy” when he heard the verdict. “Freedom,” Mukasey, who is also President Donald Trump’s personal lawyer, said on Tuesday. “Huge victory. Huge weight off the Gallagher's. Huge victory for justice.”The veteran, who served in eight overseas deployments, was charged in September with over a dozen offenses for allegedly shooting multiple Iraqi civilians in 2017—including a school-aged girl—and fatally stabbing an injured ISIS teen who was receiving medical treatment. After the stabbing, Gallagher held a “reenlistment ceremony” next to the body and took photos with it, prosecutors alleged.Military Prosecutors Accused of Spying in Navy SEAL’s War-Crimes Case“He stabbed that wounded ISIS fighter to death, and then he celebrated that stabbing,” Navy prosecutor Lt. Brian John said in his opening statements. “He celebrated that murder.”Gallagher’s case has captivated the nation and attracted the attention of several lawmakers, including President Donald Trump, who had suggested that he was considering a pardon. It’s notoriously difficult to bring charges against military officials since allegations must be vetted by enlisted superiors and “in-house” court proceedings are notoriously secret. The 39-year-old veteran was turned in by members of his platoon after allegedly bragging about several slayings. “He systematically tried to intimidate those who had the courage to report him,” John said, adding that Gallagher began a smear campaign against his platoon, posting several names on social media and labeling them “cowards in combat.”Navy prosecutors argued during the two-week-long trial in San Diego military court that the Navy SEAL—who was with his platoon on May 3 helping Iraqi troops drive out ISIS fighters from the city of Mosul—briefly treated the teenager in the field before stabbing him in the neck.“We’re not ISIS. When we capture someone and they’re out of the fight, that’s it. That’s where the line is drawn,” Navy prosecutor Cmdr. Jeff Pietrzyk said during his closing statements on Monday after acknowledging the ISIS teen would have probably “done anything in his power to kill an American.”Gallagher’s old roommate, Lt. Thomas MacNeil, testified that while helping Iraqi troops, he heard a radio transmission that an airstrike had left an ISIS fighter wounded. “I heard Chief Gallagher announce, ‘Lay off, he’s mine,’” MacNeil said.At the SEAL’s Mosul compound, Gallagher, who was once a Navy medic, approached the teenager to treat his collapsed lung—footage of which was shown to the jury. Once his colleague left the scene, prosecutors allege Gallagher pulled out his knife and began to “repeatedly stab the prisoner in the neck.”“I saw him stab the prisoner. I saw him stab him in the neck,” Navy SEAL Craig Miller, who was in Gallagher’s platoon at the time, told the jury last week. Miller echoed several other members who said they’d witnessed the slaying, which was documented in the reenlistment ceremony photos shown in court. One photograph, in which several members of the team can be seen gathered around the teenager’s body, was later attached to a text message Gallagher sent to friends, with the caption: “Good story behind this. Got him with my hunting knife.” In another photo, Gallagher is seen holding the teenager by his hair with one hand and a knife in the other.“The government’s evidence in this case is Chief Gallagher’s words, Chief Gallagher’s pictures, Chief Gallagher’s SEALs,” Pietrzyk said on Monday.Gallagher’s defense team, however, argued the allegations emerged after the team returned to San Diego and stemmed from disgruntled subordinates who felt their “harsh” platoon commander didn’t deserve a Silver Star or to be promoted.Tim Parlatore, his attorney, said the ISIS fighter died from injuries sustained in the airstrike, noting Iraqi forces had been with the “curly hair” teenager for two hours before Gallagher was able to treat him. “This case is not about murder. It’s about mutiny,” Parlatore said in his opening statement, adding there was no trace of blood found on Gallagher’s knife. “This is a group of disgruntled sailors that didn’t like being told that they were cowards. So, they conspired to take down the Chief. They made up the story and that’s why we are here.”Navy SEALs Testify Their Chief Shot Girl, Man in IraqThe text message, Parlatore argued, was in “dark humor,” but does not prove Gallagher committed any crime. “Was the photo in poor taste? Probably,” Parlatore told jurors in his opening statement. “Was the photo evidence of murder? No.”In a dramatic twist last week, however, a fellow Navy SEAL testified that it was he, not Gallagher, who killed the ISIS fighter as an act of mercy to save the teenager further pain from ISIS.The medic, Special Operator First Class Corey Scott, testified last Thursday that while Gallagher stabbed the ISIS fighter in the neck, the wound was not life threatening. Once Gallagher walked away, Scott said, he pressed his thumb over the prisoner’s breathing tube until he died to save him from possible torture by Iraqi forces.“I knew he was going to die anyway, and wanted to save him from waking up to whatever would have happened to him,” said Scott, who was granted immunity from prosecution in exchange for his testimony.Scott’s testimony was heavily scrutinized by prosecutors, who said that during his six interviews with Navy investigators, the medic had never so much as hinted that he committed the crime. “You can stand up there, and you can lie about how you killed the ISIS prisoner so Chief Gallagher does not have to go to jail,” John said in court, accusing Scott of changing his story after receiving the immunity. The Navy SEAL medic, after looking at Gallagher, told the jury his colleague has “a wife and family. I don’t think he should spend the rest of his life in prison.” A Navy spokesperson told The Daily Beast on Tuesday they are “reviewing” Scott’s testimony to determine whether he will face perjury charges for lying to investigators before taking the stand.“He [Corey Scott] changed his account to assist Chief Gallagher,” Pietrzyk said in court Monday. “He had his ‘I am Spartacus’ moment because he thought it would assist Chief Gallagher.”Fox News Host Pete Hegseth Privately Lobbied Trump to Pardon Accused War CriminalsGallagher was cleared of the most serious charges against him after months of internal court turmoil and a judge’s order to remove the lead prosecutor in the case after a bungled attempt to hack into the defense lawyer’s emails to allegedly find the source of leaks to the press.The judge, Capt. Aaron Rugh, ruled last month the hacking attempt violated Gallagher’s constitutional rights. As a result, Rugh reduced his maximum sentence to life in prison with the possibility of parole. Unlike civilian criminal trials, military court trials are based on charges brought up by other military officials and court proceedings are considered “in-house.” The jury, which included a Navy SEAL and four Marines, plus a Navy commander and a Marine chief warrant officer, was directed and overseen by a Navy judge. Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.



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Trump congratulates Navy SEAL for acquittal on war crimes charges: 'Glad I could help!'

Trump congratulates Navy SEAL for acquittal on war crimes charges: 'Glad I could help!'The president on Wednesday praised Navy SEAL Edward Gallagher, who was acquitted of murder but found guilty of posing with the body of a dead prisoner.



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US Navy SEAL found not guilty of murder in war crimes trial

US Navy SEAL found not guilty of murder in war crimes trialA decorated US Navy SEAL was found not guilty Tuesday of murdering a captive teenage militant in Iraq, the most serious of the charges brought against him during a two-week war crimes trial in San Diego. Edward Gallagher, 40, was likewise acquitted of two counts of attempted murder against Iraqi civilians, but was convicted of posing for a photograph beside the corpse of the captive Islamic State (IS) group fighter. The maximum sentence he could face is four months imprisonment, meaning he is set to walk free following Tuesday's verdict on account of the nine months he has already served in pre-trial confinement.



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US Navy SEAL found not guilty of murder in war crimes trial

US Navy SEAL found not guilty of murder in war crimes trialA decorated US Navy SEAL was found not guilty Tuesday of murdering a captive teenage militant in Iraq, the most serious of the charges brought against him during a two-week war crimes trial in San Diego. Edward Gallagher, 40, was likewise acquitted of two counts of attempted murder against Iraqi civilians, but was convicted of posing for a photograph beside the corpse of the captive Islamic State (IS) group fighter. The jury found Gallagher “not guilty of murder, not guilty of stabbing, not guilty of shooting, not guilty of all those things, they found him guilty of taking a photograph,” Timothy Parlatore, one of Gallagher’s attorney’s, told journalists outside the courthouse.



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