Tag Archives: Sanders&#39

Sanders' criminal justice plan aims to cut prison population

Sanders' criminal justice plan aims to cut prison populationDemocratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders is proposing a criminal justice overhaul that aims to cut the nation’s prison population in half, end mandatory minimum sentencing, ban private prisons and legalize marijuana. “We have a system that imprisons and destroys the lives of millions of people,” Sanders told The Associated Press before the planned released of his proposal Sunday. Sanders was promoting the plan during a weekend of campaigning in South Carolina, where the majority of the Democratic electorate is African American.



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Bernie Sanders' campaign staff demanding a 'living wage' and health care

Bernie Sanders' campaign staff demanding a 'living wage' and health careBernie Sanders pushes for a $ 15 minimum wage during his campaign; reaction from 2016 Sanders campaign staffer Tezlyn Figaro.



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‘Is Bernie going to come?’ Warren seizes on Sanders' Netroots absence

‘Is Bernie going to come?’ Warren seizes on Sanders' Netroots absenceThe gathering of political progressives found itself almost spoilt for choice by the Democratic presidential field for 2020Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren speaks at Netroots. Photograph: Elizabeth Robertson/APAmong nearly 4,000 progressive activists and organizers gathered in Philadelphia this week for the 14th and largest Netroots Nation convention, the 2020 presidential race felt like a turning point. Between Elizabeth Warren’s policy plans and Bernie Sanders’ grassroots energy, progressive ideas are dominating the Democratic primary.“We’re tired of waiting for change,” said Yvette Simpson, chief executive of Democracy for America. “We’re tired of talking about compromising with the other side when it always requires us to compromise our values. I do believe we are ready for a bold champion.”At panels, breakout sessions and happy hours, attendees marveled at their options: two uncompromising liberal senators in the top tier of a crowded primary, flanked by other candidates who have warmed to progressive ideas. Several attendees said they would be equally pleased if Sanders or Warren were the nominee.But lines were nonetheless being drawn.> Elizabeth Warren is the only candidate I truly support. Wall Street is scared shitless of her> > Arlene Geiger, New YorkArlene Geiger, from New York, said she wanted to elect the “smartest person in the room”.“Elizabeth Warren is the only candidate I truly support,” she said, adding: “Wall Street is scared shitless of her.”Geiger supported Sanders in 2016 but said Warren’s journey from midwestern college dropout to Harvard law professor and pre-eminent scholar of bankruptcy law, all before entering politics, showed her grit and intellectual capacity.“She cares deeply about the issues from a progressive’s point of view that she came to not through ideological conviction but through her own life experiences and her own research,” she said.More than two dozen attendees cited Warren as a top choice, though they hadn’t made up their minds. As alternatives, they mentioned California Senator Kamala Harris and, occasionally, the former housing secretary Julián Castro.Sola Adenekan, a first-time attendee, said she was impressed by Warren’s work on behalf of victims of predatory lending practices, which disproportionately affected people of color.“She’s had the most thought-out, well-laid-out policies of all the candidates,” she said. “And that has forced the other candidates to come to the table with policies of merit.”Sanders supporters were harder to find. Several said they would welcome a Warren administration.Mark Schaeffer, an activist in Albany, New York, and a member of Democratic Socialists of America, which has endorsed Sanders, said the Vermont senator has the “clearest analysis of the need to change the system”. But he liked Warren too and believed she had adopted Sanders’ bold stance on climate issues.“I think she has a lot of good immediate proposals but I think she’s less oriented toward system change,” he said. “And that is what we need to face a threat that is bigger than the current threat to our democracy – which is very, very serious – the threat of catastrophic global overheating.” ‘He’s letting Warren have the conversation to herself’Warren, attending her ninth Netroots, participated in the presidential forum on Saturday. Sanders did not, his absence a source of some tension.“Is Bernie going to come here tomorrow to talk to us?” one activist asked Nina Turner, the former Ohio state senator who is a co-chair of Sanders’ campaign, during a Friday panel titled Black, Brown and In Charge: New Movement Leaders and the Future of the Left.“That’s not really the topic of this panel,” the moderator said.“I’m here,” Turner said.> His presence is here. What he’s standing for is here. And then I am here> > Sanders co-chair Nina TurnerThe conference’s third presidential forum featured only a handful of candidates for the Democratic nomination, New York senator Kirsten Gillibrand, Castro and Washington governor Jay Inslee joining Warren.Organizers called Sanders’ absence a “missed opportunity”.“It’s 3,500 of the most engaged progressives in politics and he has decided that he is not going to talk to them,” said Carolyn Fiddler, spokeswoman for the Daily Kos website, a major sponsor. She added: “He’s letting Warren have the conversation to herself … and I don’t know why he would do that.”In Phoenix in 2015, Sanders and Martin O’Malley – but not Hillary Clinton – participated. Both were interrupted by Black Lives Matter activists. This year, Sanders received a mixed reception at a She the People event in Texas.Markos Moulitsas, the founder of Daily Kos who moderated the presidential panel, has been publicly critical of Sanders. “Bernie Sanders goes on Fox [News], but he’s afraid of ME?” he tweeted. “Sheesh.”The campaign said Sanders’ absence was due to a scheduling conflict. Turner rejected any suggestion the senator was “ceding” ground.“His presence is here,” she said. “What he’s standing for is here. And then I am here. Progressives should feel very confident and assured that the senator is rooted in this movement and that is going to change the dynamics of this country.”Warren was welcomed to the forum with deafening applause and the crowd chanting her name – a noticeably more enthusiastic response than the other candidates at the forum. Netroots 2019 began after the first debate reshaped the race. In an NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll, Warren surged to second behind Joe Biden with the support of 19% of likely voters compared with 26% for the former VP. Sanders tied Harris at 13%. Warren raised $ 19m in the second quarter. Sanders raised $ 18.2m.The Sanders campaign has emphasized his role in pushing policy ideas like Medicare for All and free college into the mainstream. Warren has grabbed attention with proposals including an immigration plan. Groans and eye rollsNetroots also provided a pulse check on progressive support for the other presidential hopefuls. Unsurprisingly, there was not much love for Biden. On Friday, dozens of immigration activists held a demonstration at his campaign headquarters in the city with family members of people deported by the Obama administration.Activists protest immigration policy in Philadelphia on Friday. Photograph: Jarrett Renshaw/ReutersOn a wall at the Pennsylvania Convention Center, attendees could bet on who will drop out next, an exercise seemingly based more on wishful thinking than reality. As of Saturday morning, Biden and Sanders led the way. No one was betting on Warren or Harris.Any mention of Tom Steyer, the billionaire who jumped in this week, elicited groans and eye rolls. There was little patience for candidates like the Montana governor, Steve Bullock, or former Colorado governor John Hickenlooper, moderates who some urged to run for the Senate instead.The conference also took place amid a bitter row between the House Democratic leadership and a group of newly elected members known as “the Squad”: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ayanna Pressley, Rashida Tlaib and Ilhan Omar. Netroots welcomed Pressley, Tlaib and Omar with applause and a standing ovation.“The women of color who entered Congress – they’re more than four votes,” said Aimee Allison, founder of She the People and moderator, referring to comments Pelosi made to the New York Times about the political influence of “the Squad”.“For millions of us, these women of color in Congress represent generations of blood, sweat and tears and struggle for us to have representation. And yet, if you’ve read the news, they’ve faced attacks all year from the right wing and from Democratic party leadership.”That prompted boos.Omar referred to “a constant struggle with people who have power about sharing that power” and said: “We are not really in the business of asking for the share of that power. We’re in the business of trying to grab that power and return it to the people.”In a session titled “Why Biden Is The Least Electable Major Democrat in 2020”, one audience member asked: “Would you support Biden if he were the nominee?” All of the panelists emphatically agreed that they would.But they said there was little evidence that nominating an “older white man who appeals to moderates” would help beat Donald Trump.“What are we so afraid of?” said Rebecca Katz, a New York-based progressive strategist. “Every time we show someone who is Republican-lite, we lose.”



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Bernie Sanders' opening argument: I am electable. Really.

Bernie Sanders' opening argument: I am electable. Really.WASHINGTON (AP) — Bernie Sanders spent much of 2016 talking of revolution. In 2019, he's turned to a subject that's a bit more pragmatic: electability.



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Beto O'Rourke raises $6.1m in first 24 hours, smashing Bernie Sanders' record

Beto O'Rourke raises $  6.1m in first 24 hours, smashing Bernie Sanders' recordStunning sum is more than every other Democratic challenger who has disclosed their first-day totals The former Texas congressman, like Sanders and some of his other colleagues, has shunned Pac donations of any kind. Photograph: Kathy Willens/APDemocratic hopeful Beto O’Rourke raised an unprecedented $ 6.1m during the first 24 hours of his official run for the White House, his campaign announced on Monday.The stunning sum is more than rival Bernie Sanders and every other 2020 Democratic challenger who has disclosed their first-day fundraising totals. His campaign did not immediately disclose the number of donors who contributed or the average size of the contribution.“In just 24 hours, Americans across this country came together to prove that it is possible to run a true grassroots campaign for president – a campaign by all of us, for all of us, that answers not to the Pacs, corporations and special interests but to the people,” O’Rourke said in a statement.Sign up for the US morning briefing The former Texas congressman, like Sanders and some of his other colleagues, has shunned Pac donations of any kind. He did not rule out holding fundraisers.At this stage in the primary contest, when polling typically reflects name recognition, early fundraising figures are an early test of a candidate’s strength and depth of support. For O’Rourke, the initial numbers are an indication of whether he can hold onto the support that powered his unexpectedly strong Senate challenge against incumbent Republican senator Ted Cruz last year.The first-day haul also reflects O’Rourke’s remarkable rise from little-known congressman from the border town of El Paso to a national Democratic star after narrowly losing his Senate bid. During his 2018 Senate campaign, O’Rourke shattered records when he raised a historic $ 38m in just one quarter. Average donations were about $ 47.O’Rourke formally entered the crowded Democratic primary last week after a months-long deliberation that included a five-state road trip across the American south-west, which he journaled in “Dear diary”– style posts on Medium. His rhetorical style and charismatic message has drawn comparisons to Barack Obama, but he has met resistance among some progressive activists who are critical of his ambiguity on policy.Small-dollar donations are increasingly important to Democratic candidates as the party escalates its battle against big money in politics. For the first time, the Democratic National Committee has established a grassroots fundraising threshold to participate in the party’s televised primary debates.Cory Booker, New Jersey senatorBooker first made a name as the hands-on mayor of Newark. Known for his focus on criminal justice reform and impassioned speeches on immigration, he has though been criticized for ties to Wall Street.Pete Buttigieg, South Bend mayorButtigieg wants to be the first openly gay millennial president. A Harvard graduate and Rhodes scholar, he became the youngest mayor of a mid-size US city at the age of 29. As a Navy Reserve lieutenant he deployed to Afghanistan while serving as mayor.Julián Castro, former housing and urban development secretaryCastro casts himself as an antidote to Trump and the adminstration's hardline immigration policies. The grandson of a Mexican immigrant and raised by single mother, the 44-year-old Democrat is one of the most prominent Latinos in Democratic politics.John Delaney, former Maryland congressmanHe has delivered his message of pragmatism to voters in all 99 of Iowa’s counties since he officially kicked off the race in July 2017. The multimillionaire banking entrepreneur wants to build a big-tent party that appeals to independents and moderate Republicans.Tulsi Gabbard, Hawaii congresswomanAn Iraq war veteran who has vowed to run a campaign focused on issues of “war and peace”. Gabbard made history as the first Samoan American and the first Hindu elected to Congress. But she has drawn criticism for meeting with Syria’s president Bashar al-Assad, and progressives are wary of her past conservative views on on social issues.Kirsten Gillibrand, New York senatorYears before the MeToo movement, the New York senator was leading efforts in Congress to combat sexual assault in the military and on college campuses. The former corporate lawyer has embraced a slate of economic ideas supported by the party’s progressive wing.Kamala Harris, California senatorHarris is one of Trump’s fiercest critics, and has built a national reputation grilling administration officials during their confirmation hearings. A former state attorney general and the daughter of immigrants from India and Jamaica, Harris believes she has the unique profile to take on Trump.John Hickenlooper, former Governor of ColoradoBefore he served two terms as governor of Colorado, the 67-year-old Democrat worked as a geologist for a petroleum company. After a lay off, he switched careers and opened a successful brewpub in Denver that helped to revitalize the city’s downtown.Jay Inslee, Governor of WashingtonInslee is running as the “only candidate who will make defeating climate change our nation’s number one priority”. As the country experiences more powerful hurricanes, scorching wildfires and submerged coastlines, polls show public concern is growing.Amy Klobuchar, Minnesota senatorOn Election Night 2018, Klobuchar coasted to a third term as senator in a state Trump almost won. Next morning she was on every short list of potential presidential candidates. Supporters say her success with rural voters makes her a formidable candidate in the Rust Belt, while her calm demeanour provides a clear contrast with Trump.Beto O'Rourke, former Texas congressmanA one-time guitarist for an El Paso punk band called Foss, O’Rourke had kept a relatively low profile as a three-term congressman with little name recognition. He rose to national prominence during the 2018 midterms, when his bid to unseat Senator Ted Cruz garnered unprecedented grassroots support and a historic fundraising haul.Bernie Sanders, Vermont senatorSanders turned a long-shot, anti-establishment bid for the presidency into a “political revolution” that energized the party’s progressive base. His political career began nearly 40 years ago, but it wasn’t until his 2016 run that Sanders became a national figure as a new generation of Democrats – and 2020 contenders – embraced his populist economic policies.Elizabeth Warren, Massachusetts senatorHer sharp criticism of Wall Street and big corporations has made Warren a favorite among progressive activists, and she will campaign on a message of a rigged economic system and income inequality.Marianne Williamson, authorThis is not the spiritual guru and a new age author’s first foray into politics: in 2014, she mounted an unsuccessful congressional bid in California. Her entry adds some star-power to the race that may attract more celebrities.Andrew Yang, businessmanA former tech executive and entrepreneur running the longest of long shot campaigns centered on the perils of automation. His central plank is a plan to give every American adult a salary of $ 1,000 per month, paid for by a tax on companies that benefit the most from automation.Lauren Gambino and Sam Morris Despite hinting on the campaign trail this weekend that he may not want to release his totals, O’Rourke’s $ 6.1m haul sets him apart in a sprawling field that has swelled to 16 Democrats.Sanders entered the race with the largest donor list of any candidate running – one that he developed while running for president in 2016. Even so, he stunned political observers last month when he announced that his campaign had raised $ 5.9m in his first 24 hours as a presidential candidate.California senator Kamala Harris raised more than the $ 1.5m in the first 24 hours of her campaign. Before Sanders entered the race, Harris claimed the biggest first-day fundraising total, which matched what the Vermont senator raised in April 2015 after he launched his bid for the nomination that year.Lesser-known candidates such as Minnesota senator Amy Klobuchar and former Colorado governor John Hickenlooper, each reported earning $ 1m in the first 48 hours of their campaigns, while Washington governor Jay Inslee said his campaign had raised more than $ 1m three days after he entered the race.



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Educator met with feds to talk Bernie Sanders' wife college

Educator met with feds to talk Bernie Sanders' wife collegeBURLINGTON, Vt. (AP) — A former trustee at the college where U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders' wife was president when a $ 10 million real estate deal was struck said she testified before a federal grand jury in October about the deal considered a major factor in the demise of the tiny Vermont school.



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