Tag Archives: rules

New York Judge Rules Unvaccinated Students Can't Go Back to Class

New York Judge Rules Unvaccinated Students Can't Go Back to ClassThe parents of 44 unvaccinated students in a New York suburb sued



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Modi government advertising blitz dries up as Indian poll rules kick in

Modi government advertising blitz dries up as Indian poll rules kick inThe election will be held over seven stages from April 11, the Election Commission said on Sunday, when the code of conduct on election campaigning came into force. Leading English-language national dailies including the Times of India, the Hindustan Times and the Indian Express carried no government ads on Monday. The New Delhi editions of those three newspapers had 162 government ads between March 1 and March 10, according to Reuters calculations.



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Clark killing revives push to toughen police shooting rules

Clark killing revives push to toughen police shooting rulesSACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A measure that would make California unique in restricting when police officers can use deadly force is getting renewed attention and additional support after a prosecutor said Sacramento police broke no laws when they fatally shot an unarmed black man suspected of vandalism last year.



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Royal family introduces social media rules following online abuse of Meghan and Kate

Royal family introduces social media rules following online abuse of Meghan and KateIn an unprecedented move, the Royal Family has introduced a set of social media rules in order to create a "safe environment". Under the new rules, users posting abusive comments will be blocked or reported to police, and comments in breach of the guidelines will be hidden or deleted.  The move comes after reports that royal staff are inundated with abusive comments aimed at Meghan Markle and Kate Middleton. The guidelines will apply to comments posted on channels run by the Royal Family, Kensington Palace, and Clarence House. SEE ALSO: Why the royal statement on trolling is unprecedentedComments must not "promote discrimination based on race, sex, religion, nationality, disability, sexual orientation, or age.""Comments must not: contain spam, be defamatory of any person, deceive others, be obscene, offensive, threatening, abusive, hateful, inflammatory or promote sexually explicit material or violence," the guidelines read. Image: www.royal.uk/"We ask that anyone engaging with our social media channels shows courtesy, kindness and respect for all other members of our social media communities," the guidelines continue. Per these rules, anyone engaging with any of the royal family's social media channels will be subject to these requirements. Anyone in breach of these rules will be blocked or even reported to the authorities. "We reserve the right to hide or delete comments made on our channels, as well as block users who do not follow these guidelines," reads the guidelines. "We also reserve the right to send any comments we deem appropriate to law enforcement authorities for investigation as we feel necessary or is required by law." WATCH: Lifetime just released a movie about Prince Harry and Meghan Markle in honor of their upcoming wedding



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Hoda Muthana, who married into ISIS, won't get fast-tracked case, federal judge rules

Hoda Muthana, who married into ISIS, won't get fast-tracked case, federal judge rulesA federal court ruled that Hoda Muthana, a woman who fled Alabama to marry an Islamic State fighter in Syria, won't get a fast-tracked legal case.



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Fathers becoming fathers: The Vatican's secret rules

Fathers becoming fathers: The Vatican's secret rulesFrom a Stonehenge mystery to Bernie Sanders running for president, here’s Tuesday’s top news.



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Former Trump aide Paul Manafort lied to prosecutors, judge rules

Former Trump aide Paul Manafort lied to prosecutors, judge rulesPaul Manafort, the former Trump campaign chairman, intentionally lied to investigators and a federal grand jury in the special counsel’s Russia probe, a judge ruled on Wednesday. US District Judge Amy Berman Jackson’s decision was another loss for Manafort, a once-wealthy political consultant who rose to lead Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign and now faces years in prison in two criminal cases brought in special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation. The four-page ruling hurts Manafort’s chance of receiving a reduced sentence, though Jackson said she would decide the exact impact during his sentencing next month. It also resolves a dispute that had provided new insight into how Mueller views Manafort’s actions as part of the broader probe of Russian election interference and any possible coordination with Trump associates. Prosecutors have made clear that they remain deeply interested in Manafort’s interactions with a man the FBI says has ties to Russian intelligence.  Manafort arrives for arraignment on charges of witness tampering, at U.S. District Court in Washington Credit: Reuters But it’s unclear exactly what has drawn their attention and whether it relates to election interference because much of the dispute has played out in secret court hearings and blacked out court filings. In her ruling on Wednesday, Jackson provided few new details as she found there was sufficient evidence to say Manafort broke the terms of his plea agreement by lying about three of five matters that prosecutors had singled out. The ruling was largely a rejection of Manafort’s attorneys’ argument that he hadn’t intentionally misled investigators but rather forgot some details until his memory was refreshed. The judge found that Manafort did mislead the FBI, prosecutors and a federal grand jury about his interactions with Konstantin Kilimnik, the co-defendant who the FBI says has ties to Russian intelligence. Prosecutors had accused Manafort of lying about several discussions the two men had including about a possible peace plan to resolve the Russia-Ukraine conflict in Crimea. During a sealed hearing last week, Mueller prosecutor Andrew Weissmann said one of the discussions- an August 2, 2016, meeting at the Grand Havana Club cigar bar in New York- went to the "larger view of what we think is going on" and what "we think the motive here is." Paul Manafort timeline "This goes, I think, very much to the heart of what the Special Counsel’s Office is investigating," Weissmann said, according to a redacted transcript of the hearing. He added: "That meeting and what happened at that meeting is of significance to the special counsel." The meeting occurred while Manafort was still in a high-ranking role in the Trump campaign. Rick Gates, Manafort’s longtime deputy and also a Trump campaign aide, attended. And prosecutors say the three men left separately so as not to draw attention to their meeting. Weissmann said investigators were also interested in several other meetings between Kilimnik and Manafort including when Kilimnik travelled to Washington for Mr Trump’s inauguration in January 2017. And Manafort’s attorneys accidentally revealed weeks ago that prosecutors believe Manafort shared polling data with Kilimnik during the 2016 presidential campaign. Profile | Paul Manafort On Wednesday, Jackson found that in addition to his interactions with Kilimnik, there was sufficient evidence that Manafort had lied about a payment to a law firm representing him and about an undisclosed Justice Department investigation. But she found there wasn’t enough evidence to back up two other allegations. The judge said prosecutors failed to show Manafort intentionally lied about Kilimnik’s role in witness tampering or about Manafort’s contacts with the Trump administration in 2017 and 2018. Kilimnik, who lives in Russia, was charged alongside Manafort with conspiracy and obstruction of justice. He has yet to appear in a US court to face the charges. Manafort’s sentencing is set for March 13. He faces up to five years in prison on two felony charges stemming from illegal lobbying he performed on behalf of Ukrainian political interests. Separately, he faces the possibility of a decade in prison in a federal case in Virginia where he was convicted last year of tax and bank fraud crimes. Sentencing in that case was delayed pending Jackson’s ruling in the plea-deal dispute.



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Judge rules that ex-Trump aide Manafort broke plea deal

Judge rules that ex-Trump aide Manafort broke plea dealFormer Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort could face a much longer prison sentence than expected after a Washington judge ruled Wednesday that he had broken his plea deal with Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation. Federal district judge Amy Berman Jackson agreed with prosecutors that Manafort had “intentionally” lied to investigators about his contacts with a suspected Russian operative, Konstantin Kilimnik in 2016 and 2017, despite having pledged to cooperate as part of his September plea agreement. Jackson also ruled that Manafort had lied about a secretive payment he made to a law firm, and lied on another occasion when investigators queried him about a separate, still secret investigation related to the Mueller probe.



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Guaido rules out risk of civil war in Venezuela

Guaido rules out risk of civil war in VenezuelaVenezuela’s self-proclaimed acting president Juan Guaido ruled out the possibility of civil war in his country, saying the overwhelming majority of his compatriots wanted Nicolas Maduro to step down. In an interview to Spain’s El Pais newspaper published Thursday, Guaido repeated an appeal to Venezuela’s armed forces to take his side. “The risk of a civil war in Venezuela does not exist, despite what certain people want to believe or want to let us believe.



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Venezuela set for another round of protests as Maduro rules out fresh elections

Venezuela set for another round of protests as Maduro rules out fresh electionsVenezuela's President Nicolas Maduro said he was prepared to hold negotiations with the US-backed opposition but ruled out early presidential elections as Caracas braced itself for fresh street protests. "I am ready to sit down at the negotiating table with the opposition so that we could talk for the good of Venezuela," Maduro told the Russian state news agency in an interview in Caracas. Last week the oil-rich but economically devastated Latin American country was plunged into uncertainty when the US-backed opposition leader Juan Guaido proclaimed himself "acting president". The United States, a dozen Latin American countries and Canada have recognised Guaido as interim president, while China and Russia - Venezuela's two main creditors – have urged non-interference. Support for Venezuela leadership In the interview with RIA Novosti, Maduro also said he would support early parliamentary elections. "It would be very good to conduct parliamentary elections at an earlier stage, it would be a good form of political discussion," Maduro said. At the same time he dismissed the possibility of holding a new presidential poll any time soon. "Presidential elections in Venezuela have taken place, and if imperialists want new elections let them wait until 2025," he said in an apparent reference to Washington. Guaido called for more protests on Wednesday and a mass march on the weekend, in a bid to keep up pressure on Maduro in the streets. Wednesday's action would not be a major march, but a series of small concentrations, Guaido said. The UN human rights office said the protests had so far led to the deaths of more than 40 people. Maduro has been in charge since 2013 but his re-election in May was branded illegitimate by the European Union, United States and Organization of American States. Students walk past a painting of US President Donald Trump on a wall in Caracas Credit:  JUAN BARRETO/AFP The embattled leader also implied he was firmly in charge of the army whose support is crucial. "I am carrying out my duties as commander-in-chief according to the Constitution consolidating the national Bolivarian armed forces," he said. "And the Bolivarian armed forces are demonstrating a lesson in ethics, loyalty and discipline." Maduro also claimed that US President Donald Trump had ordered the government of Colombia to assassinate him. "If something happens to me one day then Donald Trump and Colombian President Ivan Duque will be responsible for everything that is happening to me," he said, adding however that he was in good hands. "At the same time, I am protected. We have a good system of defence in place and moreover, we have more significant protection – this is protection from God who will give me a long life," Maduro added. Russia has denounced the opposition's "usurpation of power", calling Maduro the crisis-hit country's legitimate leader. Russia and Venezuela have a long history of ties and Maduro's predecessor Hugo Chavez, known for his tirades against the United States, was a welcome guest at the Kremlin.



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