Tag Archives: Risk

Dementia risk doubles right after a stroke

Dementia risk doubles right after a strokeWhile stroke has long been linked to a heightened risk of dementia, particularly in older adults, the exact magnitude of the increased risk hasn’t been consistent across previous studies investigating this connection. People who had a recent stroke were 2.2 times more likely to develop dementia than people who never had a stroke, the analysis found. “These findings stress the importance of protecting the blood supply to the brain in order to protect against dementia,” said senior study author Dr. David Llewellyn of the University of Exeter Medical School in the UK.



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Ford Recalls 1.6 Million F-150 Pickups for Fire Risk

Ford Recalls 1.6 Million F-150 Pickups for Fire RiskFord is recalling 1,619,112 Ford F-150 Regular Cab and SuperCrew Cab pickup trucks, from model years 2015-2018, because of a fire risk. The company says that seat belt pretensioners can create “e…



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Why did the Genoa bridge collapse – and how thousands of other structures in Italy are at risk

Why did the Genoa bridge collapse - and how thousands of other structures in Italy are at riskItalian prosecutors are opening an investigation into the Genoa bridge collapse, as questions swirled over what caused the structure to crumble.  At least 38 people died when a 650-foot portion of the Morandi motorway bridge in northern Italy disintegrated on Tuesday. The 51-year-old structure, designed by celebrated Italian engineer Riccardo Morandi, has been beset with problems since its construction in the 1960s, leading to expensive maintenance and drawing fierce criticism from engineering experts. Possible mafia connections have been raised. Dave Parker, Technical Editor Emeritus of New Civil Engineer told Radio 4's Today programme that the quality of the materials could have been affected by mafia involvement in the construction industry.  "According to urban myths, the mafia had a very big finger in the pie of the concrete industry back then, charging full price and putting less cement in," he said.  Genoa motorway bridge collapses Concerns have also been raised about the integrity of other structures built following the Second World War, with one engineering body saying tens of thousands of bridges and viaducts in Italy could be at risk. Giuseppe Conte, the Prime Minister, said "all infrastructure" across the country needed to be double-checked. "We must not allow another tragedy like this to happen again," he added. Danilo Toninelli, the Transport Minister,  said the collapse was "unacceptable" and that if negligence played a role "whoever made a mistake must pay." Built between 1963 and 1967, the bridge had a maximum span of 718 feet, a total length of 0.7 miles, and concrete piers – vertical structures buttressing the arches of a bridge – that reach 295 feet in height. 'Structural doubts' over design The technology of pre-stressed reinforced concrete used in the construction was the hallmark of its designer, Mr Morandi, who died in 1989. Dubbed patent "Morandi M5", he had used the technology for other works, including a wing of the Verona Arena in 1953. This technique also characterises another, even longer and just as problematic Morandi bridge: the 5.4 mile long General Rafael Urdaneta Bridge that spans the bay of Maracaibo, Venezuela, and was completed in 1962. It partially collapsed in 1964 after being hit by an oil tanker and was rebuilt.  The Morandi bridge in Genoa had always presented "structural doubts", according to an article published by specialist engineering website "Ingegneri.info", which called it "a tragedy waiting to happen". Antonio Brencich, a professor of reinforced concrete construction at the University of Genoa, echoed those concerns.  "It was affected by extremely serious corrosion problems linked to the technology that was used (in construction). Morandi wanted to use a technology that he had patented that was no longer used afterwards and that showed itself to be a failure," Professor Brencich told Radio Capitale. Professor Brencich has long been a critic of the bridge. Two years ago, he told "Ingegneri.info" that the bridge's construction went over budget and poor calculations over concrete viscosity led to an uneven road surface which wasn’t fully corrected until the 1980s. Safety work had been commissioned Mr Toninelli said the company that has the concession to operate that section of highway said its maintenance on the bridge was up to date and no work was being done at the time of the collapse. But he added that they were about to launch a 20 million euro (£17.8 million) bidding process for significant safety work on the bridge. "There has not been sufficient maintenance and checks, and safety work for many bridges and viaducts and bridges in Italy constructed – almost all – during the 1960s," he said. The tender provided for a strengthening of the bridge’s pier cables, including those of pier nine, the one that collapsed on Tuesday. Notwithstanding the importance of a road that sees 25 million vehicles pass along it every year, the demolition of the bridge was being studied as far back as 2009. Bridges such as the Morandi viaduct should have a lifespan of at least a century, "Ingegneri.info" reported, but the structure had been the subject of major maintenance work in the years after its completion, in particular to repair cracks and combat degradation of the concrete. In the early 2000s the suspension cables put in place in the 1980s and 1990s were replaced. "Fifty years ago, we had unlimited confidence in reinforced concrete, we thought it was eternal, but now we know that it only lasted a few decades," Diego Zoppi, former president of the Genoa branch of the order of architects, told reporters on Tuesday. Rescue teams work among the rubble of the collapsed Morando highway bridge in Genoa Credit: AP Mr Zoppi warned that it was impossible to say similar tragedies would not happen again without serious work on infrastructure built after the Second World War. "The Italy built in the 1950s and 1960s is in urgent need of renovation. The risk of collapses is underestimated, the works built at that time are coming to an age when they are at risk." 'Tens of thousands need to be replaced' The Italian CNR civil engineering society said structures as old as the Morandi Bridge had exceeded their lifespan. It called for a "Marshall Plan" to repair or replace tens of thousands of bridges and viaducts built in the 1950s and 1960s. Updating and reinforcing the bridges would be more expensive than destroying and rebuilding them with technology that could last a century. They cited previous accidents: a bridge that fell in April 2017 in the northern province of Cuneo, crushing a carabinieri police car after the officers and driver had barely managed to get away in time; and an overpass that in the northern city of Lecco that collapsed under exceptional weight, crushing a car and killing the driver. A truck is seen at the collapsed Morandi Bridge site in the port city of Genoa, Italy  Credit: Reuters Experts also said it was possible the thunderstorm could have contributed to the collapse after witnesses said it was struck by lightning shortly before it crumbled. "As this reinforced and pre-stressed concrete bridge has been there for 50 years it is possible that corrosion of tendons or reinforcement may be a contributory factor," said Ian Firth, former president of The Institution of Structural Engineers. He called the bridge "an unusual design." "The fact that there was reported to be a storm at the time may or may not be particularly relevant.” Mehdi Kashani, an associate professor in structural mechanics at the University of Southampton, said maintenance issues and pressure from "dynamic loads," such as traffic and wind, could have resulted in "fatigue damage in bridge components."



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Former Bush Aide: Trump’s ‘Loopy Ways’ Put Him At Massive Risk In A Mueller Sit-Down

Former Bush Aide: Trump’s ‘Loopy Ways’ Put Him At Massive Risk In A Mueller Sit-DownFormer White House press secretary Ari Fleischer said Wednesday that an



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Strong quake hits western Japan, no tsunami risk

Strong quake hits western Japan, no tsunami riskA strong quake hit western Japan early Monday, but there were no immediate reports of major damage or risk of tsunami waves, officials said. The 5.3-magnitude quake struck at a depth of 15.4 kilometres (10 miles) at 7:58 am (2258 GMT Sunday) near Osaka, according to the United States Geological Survey. There was no risk of tsunami from the tremor, the Japanese meteorological agency said, putting its magnitude at 5.9, and the epicentre at a depth of 10 kilometres.



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The Right-To-Try Bill Puts Patients At Risk In The Name Of Helping Them

The Right-To-Try Bill Puts Patients At Risk In The Name Of Helping ThemCongress recently approved the federal right-to-try bill after a months-long



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Almost all in Congo city at immediate risk of Ebola now vaccinated -WHO

Almost all in Congo city at immediate risk of Ebola now vaccinated -WHOBy Tom Miles GENEVA (Reuters) – The World Health Organization said on Tuesday almost all the people it considers at immediate risk from an Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo city of Mbandaka have now been vaccinated against the disease. More than 400 potential Ebola contacts have been vaccinated, which represents 90 percent of those considered at risk, said Peter Salama, WHO Deputy Director-General for Emergency Preparedness and Response. “We can’t conclude that we’ve safeguarded the city of Mbandaka but we can say that so far there has not been an explosive increase in cases.



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Easy and inventive egg recipes (that will reduce your risk of stroke)

Easy and inventive egg recipes (that will reduce your risk of stroke)With the news that eating one egg a day may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, it seems only right that eggs are making a breakfast comeback. According to new research published in the journal Heart, for which researchers from Peking University Health Science Centre examined data from over 400,000 participants in China, consumption of up to one egg daily was linked with lower rates of strokes and heart disease. While in this country, it seems we have already embraced the idea of going to work on an egg once more. In March, figures showed that we are eat on average an egg every two days - bringing us closer to the levels of egg consumption seen in the 1970s, when they were at their peak.  The British Egg Industry Council, which carried out the research, said people are once again taking the time to make a "proper" breakfast after a string of reports warning of cereal's high sugar content, with some containing as much as 12g of sugar per serving.  It is estimated that over the Easter bank holiday around 45 million eggs are eaten a day, with families sitting down to brunches that star eggs as the star of the show.  Not only are eggs delicious and incredibly versatile, they are an extremely healthy choice too, being high in protein, low in calories and full of vitamins. Here, then, we share some of our favourite egg-based recipes, making the most of this humble yet heroic ingredient.  Easy and exciting egg recipes Coddled eggs with spinach, mushrooms, and Marmite soldiers Credit: ANDERS SCHONNEMANN  Colourful layered eggs Credit: Susan Bell The Delauney's eggs Arlington   Socca flatbreads with herb yoghurt, harissa, feta and fried eggs Credit: Olivia Williamson  Baked sausages, with beans, eggs and feta  Credit: Haarala Hamilton  Breakfast bacon and egg tart The perfect shakshuka Credit: Heathcliff O'Malley Duck egg with smoked salmon and caviar Credit: KATE WHITAKER New potato and chorizo hash with asparagus and poached egg Indian cheese on toast Credit: Dishoom  Sweet potato mash with bacon lardons, fried egg and parsley pesto Credit: Yuki Sugiura



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Israel tells Assad to 'get rid of the Iranians' or risk more strikes in Syria

Israel tells Assad to 'get rid of the Iranians' or risk more strikes in SyriaIsrael warned the Syrian regime on Friday to “get rid of the Iranians” or else risk further large scale Israeli airstrikes against Iran’s forces in Syrian territory.  A day after Israel launched “Operation House of Cards” – sending warplanes to hit 70 targets across Syria in response to what it said was an Iranian rocket attack on the Golan Heights – Israeli defence minister Avigdor Lieberman issued a message to Damascus.  “They are not helping you, they only cause damage, and their presence will only cause problems and damages,” Mr Lieberman said during a tour of the Golan. “Get rid of the Iranians and maybe it will be possible to have a different kind of life.” Iran meanwhile denied that its forces were behind the rocket attack early on Thursday morning and said Israel had launched the airstrikes into Syria based on “fabricated and baseless excuses”. The spike in violence between Iran and Israel across the Golan came as Tehran prepares to mount a complicated diplomatic offensive to try to salvage the Iran nuclear deal in the wake of Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw.  Javad Zarif, the Iranian foreign minister, will leave today (SAT) on a worldwide trip to Beijing, Moscow and Brussels to meet with the remaining members of the nuclear agreement and urge them not to give in to US pressure to halt trade with Iran.   Israel said it hit most of Iran's bases in Syria Credit: REUTERS/Omar Sanadiki  “The foreign minister has been tasked with the duty of taking the necessary measures to obtain guarantees from the remaining parties of the JCPOA as well as Iran’s other economic partners,” Iran’s government said in a statement.  The statement warned that even as Mr Zarif was on his diplomatic mission Iran was making preparations so that it could resume “industrial scale” uranium enrichment.  Such a move be a breach of the nuclear agreement and likely set Iran back on a potential course towards major conflict with Israel and the US, which have both said they will not allow Iran to develop the capacity for a nuclear weapon.  Iran is seeking assurances that European, Russian and Chinese companies will continue to do business with Iran, even in the face of threats from the US that companies which do so may face American sanctions.  In response to US persistent violations & unlawful withdrawal from the nuclear deal, as instructed by President Rouhani, I'll spearhead a diplomatic effort to examine whether remaining JCPOA participants can ensure its full benefits for Iran. Outcome will determine our response.— Javad Zarif (@JZarif) May 8, 2018 An early test is likely to come this week when Airbus, a European aircraft maker, is expected to announce whether it will continue with a £15 billion deal to supply Iran with 100 commercial planes. The deal is of major importance to Iran and its national carrier, IranAir, which has been struggling for years with a fleet of aging planes. If the Airbus deal falls through it is likely to strengthen the hand of Iranian hardliners calling an end to the nuclear agreement.  Meanwhile, an aide to Vladimir Putin said that Russia was not planning to move supply the Syrian regime with sophisticated S-300 anti-aircraft missiles. Vladimir Kozhin, a Kremlin official, said the Syrian regime had “everything they needed”.  The announcement appeared to be a victory for Israel as the S-300 system in the hands of the Syrian regime would potentially threaten Israel’s freedom to carry out airstrikes against Iranian targets in Syria.  The announcement also seemed to be another sign of tensions between Iran and Russia, who are fighting on the same side on behalf of the Syrian regime. By refusing to supply the S-300 system to Damascus, Russia is leaving Iranian troops exposed to future Israeli strikes.  Asharq Al-Awsat, a London-based Arab newspaper, published an unconfirmed account tensions with Iran’s government over the attack in the Golan. It claimed that Hassan Rouhani, Iran’s president, accused the Revolutionary Guard of launching the rocket attack as a way of sabotaging his efforts to save the nuclear agreement.  Israel’s military appeared confident that its wave strikes had deterred Iran from another attack in the near future. Israeli civilians on the Golan Heights were told they could close their bomb shelters, which had been open since Tuesday. “There is intelligence information behind that decision,” a military official said.     Israeli officials said they had significantly set back Iran’s military capabilities in Syria but would remain vigilant as Iran flew in new weapons and equipment.  Meanwhile, Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Khamenei, said Iran had obtained a letter sent by Mr Trump to Arab allies demanding that they do more for the US in return for America's military presence in the Middle East. "The US wants to own humiliated slaves," the ayatollah said.  Mr Trump has publicly complained about US allies in Europe and the Middle East taking advantage of American security guarantees. "They have to step up tremendously — not a little bit, but tremendously — their financial effort,” Mr Trump said of the Gulf states.  US officials confirmed to the New York Times that Mr Trump had sent a letter to Saudi Arabia, Egypt, the UAE and Bahrain, but said the Iranian leader had mischaracterised its content to make it sound more divisive than it was. 



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Scientists: Explosive eruption risk rises for Hawaii volcano

Scientists: Explosive eruption risk rises for Hawaii volcanoPAHOA, Hawaii (AP) — Hawaii's Kilauea volcano could soon send boulders and ash shooting out of its summit crater in the kind of explosive eruption last displayed nearly a century ago.



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