Tag Archives: recognition

A Harvard freshman made a social networking app called ‘The FaceTag.’ It’s sparked a debate about the ethics of facial recognition.


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Disabled DR Congo street musicians push for copyright recognition


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Turkey summons U.S. ambassador over Armenian genocide recognition


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Armenian Americans celebrate Biden’s recognition of genocide


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Cambridge University asks public to pull faces at their phones to expose ‘flawed’ emotion recognition technology


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Cyprus farmers say new EU recognition will make halloumi too expensive to produce


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Facial recognition software unable to recognise trans people, university study suggests

Facial recognition software unable to recognise trans people, university study suggestsFacial recognition software is unable to recognise trans people, a university study has suggested. The University of Colorado Boulder in the US set out to investigate the accuracy of facial analysis technology with transgender people and those who classify themselves as gender non-binary. Researches collected almost 2,500 images of faces from Instagram which had a hashtag indicating their gender identity, including women, men, transwoman, transman, agender, agenderqueer, nonbinary.  The images were then analysed by four of the largest providers of facial analysis services, IBM, Amazon, Microsoft and Calrifai.  Researchers found that on average the systems were most accurate with photos of cisgender women, getting their gender right 98.3 per cent of the time. Cisgender men were categorised accurately 97.6 per cent of the time. How facial recognition technology works However, while the facial recognition software is often accurate, the researchers found that it struggled to identify transgender people. Trans men, however, were wrongly identified as women up to 38 per cent of the time. And those who identified as agender, genderqueer or nonbinary – people who do not identify as either male or female – were mischaracterised 100 per cent of the time. Responding to the results, Dr Jane Hamlin, president of the Beaumont Society, a transgender support group, said: “It is unfortunate that these service providers are still stuck in the past with the out-dated notion of just two discrete genders.” “Fortunately, the rest of us are moving on and recognise that there is a range of gender identities that better match the real situation.  “Clearly more work needs to be done in ensuring that this software – if it is to be used, and that is contentious in some quarters – is much more accurate and reflects the rich diversity of people all around us. Misgendering people, for whatever reason, is thoughtless and hurtful.” The study comes as the use of facial recognition tech – using hidden cameras to assess certain features about an individual – is becoming increasingly prevalent, embedded in everything from smartphone dating apps to law enforcement. Previous research suggests that the technology is most accurate when assessing the gender of white men, but misidentifies women of colour as much as one-third of the time. FACIAL RECOGNITION: ITS PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE Study lead author Morgan Klaus Scheuerman, a PhD student at the University of Colorado Boulder in the US, said: "We found that facial analysis services performed consistently worse on transgender individuals, and were universally unable to classify non-binary genders. "While there are many different types of people out there, these systems have an extremely limited view of what gender looks like". Dr Jed Brubaker, an Assistant Professor of Information Science at UC Boulder, added: "We knew there were inherent biases in these systems around race and ethnicity and we suspected there would also be problems around gender. We set out to test this in the real world." "These systems don't know any other language but male or female, so for many gender identities it is not possible for them to be correct." The research also suggests that facial recognition services also suggests that such services identify gender based on outdated stereotypes. When Mr Scheuerman, who is male and has long hair, submitted his own picture, half the services categorised him as female. He added: "These systems run the risk of reinforcing stereotypes of what you should look like if you want to be recognised as a man or a woman. And that impacts everyone." The researchers could not get access to the training data or image inputs used to "teach" the system what male and female looks like, but previous research suggests they assess things like eye position, lip fullness, hair length and even clothing. Facial recognition, fake views and virtual excursions – is this the cruise ship of the future? The market for facial recognition services is projected to double by 2024 and, already, many people engage with the technology every day to gain access to their smartphones or log into their computers. That has bred concerns that there could be grave consequences if certain vulnerable populations are consistently misgendered. Alternatively, a mismatch between the gender a facial recognition camera sees and the documentation a person carries could lead to problems getting through airport security. Mr Sheuerman is most concerned that it will reaffirm notions that transgender people don't fit in. He said: "People think of computer vision as futuristic, but there are lots of people who could be left out of this so-called future." The authors would like tech companies to move away from gender classification entirely and stick to more specific labels like "long hair" or "make-up" when assessing images. Dr Brubaker added: "When you walk down the street you might look at someone and presume that you know what their gender is, but that is a really quaint idea from the 90s and it is not what the world is like anymore. "As our vision and our cultural understanding of what gender is has evolved, the algorithms driving our technological future have not. That's deeply problematic." The research will be presented in November at the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work in Austin, Texas.



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India Is Planning a Huge China-Style Facial Recognition Program

India Is Planning a Huge China-Style Facial Recognition Program(Bloomberg) — India is planning to set up one of the world’s largest facial recognition systems, potentially a lucrative opportunity for surveillance companies and a nightmare for privacy advocates who fear it will lead to a Chinese-style Orwellian state.Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government will open bids next month to build a system to centralize facial recognition data captured through surveillance cameras across India. It would link up with databases containing records for everything from passports to fingerprints to help India’s depleted police force identify criminals, missing persons and dead bodies.The government says the move is designed to help one of the world’s most understaffed police forces, which has one officer for every 724 citizens — well below global norms. It also could be a boon for companies: TechSci Research estimates India’s facial recognition market will grow sixfold by 2024 to $ 4.3 billion, nearly on par with China.But the project is also ringing alarm bells in a nation with no data privacy laws and a government that just shut down the internet for the last seven weeks in the key state of Kashmir to prevent unrest. While India is still far from implementing a system that matches China’s ability to use technology to control the population, the lack of proper safeguards opens the door for abuses.“We’re the only functional democracy which will set up such as system without any data protection or privacy laws,” said Apar Gupta, a Delhi-based lawyer and executive director of the Internet Freedom Foundation, a non-profit group whose members successfully lobbied the government in 2015 to ensure net neutrality and reject platforms like Facebook Inc.’s Free Basics. “It’s like a gold rush for companies seeking large unprotected databases.”Black MarketA draft data protection bill presented to the government last year still hasn’t been approved by the cabinet or introduced into parliament. The country has already had problems implementing Aadhaar, one of the world’s biggest biometric databases linking everything from bank accounts to income tax filings, which been plagued by reports of data leaks and the growth of a black market for personal information.So far, not much is known about which companies might bid on the facial-recognition system. Minutes of a meeting with potential bidders, obtained by the Internet Freedom Foundation through a right to information request, showed unidentified companies sought clarifications on integrating facial recognition data with state databases and whether it should be able to identify people with plastic surgery.Vasudha Gupta, a spokeswoman for the Home Ministry, didn’t respond to an email seeking comments about the system.For some in the police force, the system will be an essential tool to fight crime if implemented properly. India has seen more than 100 terrorist attacks in the last three decades, including one on luxury hotels and a train station in Mumbai that killed 166 people in 2008.‘Powerful Tool’Nilabh Kishore, who headed a unit fighting organized crime in the state of Punjab until last year, had success against gangsters after he set up a system linking data from police stations across the state.“A system that can identify criminals is invaluable — facial recognition is a powerful tool,” said Kishore, who is now deputy inspector general of the Indo-Tibetan Border Police. “But human intentions are also very important. You can make the best of technology, but if human intentions are wrong it can be a tool for misuse.”That’s particularly a worry for vulnerable minority groups that have long faced discrimination in India. Lower castes and tribals account for about a quarter of the population but constitute 34% of India’s prisoners, according to the National Dalit Movement for Justice.In January, the Delhi High Court said it was “unacceptable“ that facial recognition had not helped trace any of the 5,000 children missing from the city in three years. Earlier this month, photos and phone numbers from a Madurai city police facial recognition database in the southern state of Tamil Nadu were leaked online.Surveillance ThreatThe threat of foreign spying is also persistent. Last month a federal government think tank criticized the local administration in Delhi for hiring the Indian arm of Chinese firm Hikvision to set up 150,000 CCTVs, saying the move could spur illegal hacking and data leaks to the Chinese government.Foreign surveillance companies operating in India include CP Plus, Dahua, Panasonic Corp., Bosch Security Systems, Honeywell International Inc., and D-Link India Ltd. Many Indian companies won’t be able to bid on the facial-recognition system because the current tender requires them to meet standards established by the U.S. National Institute of Science and Technology, according to Atul Rai, chief executive officer of Staqu Technologies, an Indian startup.Rai, whose company has developed facial recognition for eight local police forces, said India doesn’t have the same quality cameras as China — making it harder to meet the goal of being able to identify any person with an integrated system. He also said it would be more difficult to implement a national network in India because state governments are responsible for law and order under its constitution.“But if this one happens in line with the government’s plan, it should be a China-like system,” Rai said. “Any powerful country wants to be like China when it comes to using technology to monitor people — even western countries.”\–With assistance from Santosh Kumar.To contact the reporter on this story: Archana Chaudhary in New Delhi at achaudhary2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Ruth Pollard at rpollard2@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.



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US senator vows to seek recognition of Israeli rule in Golan

US senator vows to seek recognition of Israeli rule in GolanJERUSALEM (AP) — U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham on Monday vowed to push for U.S. recognition of Israeli sovereignty over the Golan Heights, in what would represent a new contentious political gift to Israel from the Trump administration.



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Face recognition nabs fake passport user at US airport

Face recognition nabs fake passport user at US airportFacial recognition technology was credited with the arrest this week of a man attempting to use a fake passport to enter the United States at Washington’s Dulles airport, officials said. Officials said that on the third day of deployment of the new technology, border agents were able to determine that the man was using a fake French passport. US Customs and Border Protection, part of the Department of Homeland Security, said Dulles is one of 14 “early adopter airports” using facial recognition technology for the entry process, and began deploying it Monday.



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