Tag Archives: racism

Buttigieg: Trump Supporters are ‘At Best Looking the Other Way on Racism’

Buttigieg: Trump Supporters are ‘At Best Looking the Other Way on Racism’South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete Buttigieg implied on Monday that supporters of President Trump tacitly support racism."Anyone who supported this President is, at best, looking the other way on racism," Buttigieg said at a South Carolina campaign event.This is not the first time that Buttigieg has made this comment. In August, the Mayor told CNN's State of the Union that a vote for Trump in 2020 would mean ignoring racism in the U.S."Do you think that it's a racist act to cast a vote for President Trump in 2020?" host Jake Tapper asked the candidate."Well, at best, it means looking the other way on racism," Buttigieg responded. "Basically, what [Trump] is saying is, I want you to look the other way on racism."Buttigieg began this week a four-day campaign tour of North and South Carolina and Alabama, in a bid to reach out to black voters. The Mayor was polling at zero percent among black voters in South Carolina in November, which according to some reports was due to concern over his sexuality."We certainly knew that there was an opportunity and a need to mix it up in terms of our style of engagement and our approach," Buttigieg told the New York Times on Tuesday.In an October debate, Buttigieg said he was the candidate "who can turn the page and unify a dangerously polarized country."The mayor is leading polls in Iowa and New Hampshire, the first two states to hold primary caucuses. Nationally he remains in fourth place, well behind frontrunner Joe Biden and trailing progressives Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren.New Jersey Senator Cory Booker has complained that since Kamala Harris dropped out of the presidential race, the Democratic field has become much less diverse."We're spiraling toward a debate stage without a single person of color," Booker wrote on Twitter on Tuesday.



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Jewish death row inmate wins appeal days before execution after judge’s ‘regular racism and antisemitism’ revealed

Jewish death row inmate wins appeal days before execution after judge’s ‘regular racism and antisemitism’ revealedFor more than 15 years on death row, Randy Halprin filed challenge after challenge to his sentence. The denials began to stack up.Finally, on Friday, one of his appeals persuaded Texas’ highest court to stay his execution, which had been scheduled for 10 October.



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Justin Trudeau says white 'privilege' blinded him to racism of blackface as he expresses 'deep regret'

Justin Trudeau says white 'privilege' blinded him to racism of blackface as he expresses 'deep regret'Justin Trudeau has refused to rule out the existence of more pictures of himself in blackface as he said white "privilege" had blinded him to the racism of the practice.  Three separate cases of Mr Trudeau wearing blackface have emerged in the last two days, shredding his reputation as a liberal poster boy a month before the Canadian elections. During a press conference on Thursday afternoon, Mr Trudeau said he "deeply regretted" the incidents, saying it was the sort of discrimination ethnic minorities "face on a regular basis". "I didn't see that from the layers of privilege that I have. And for that I am deeply sorry, and I apologise". He declined to be drawn on whether further photographs may emerge, saying "I am wary of being definitive about this because the recent pictures that came out I had not remembered." Mr Trudeau admitted he did not reveal the episodes to his Liberal Party during vetting processes when he ran for office, saying "I never talked about this. Quite frankly I was embarrassed". The Canadian leader's political turmoil began on Wednesday night, when Time magazine published a yearbook photograph of a 29-year-old Mr Trudeau wearing robes and a turban, his hands, face and neck coated with brown makeup. Then a teacher at West Point Grey Academy in Vancouver, Mr Trudeau was attending an Arabian nights themed gala dressed as Aladdin. In the few photos from the event, Mr Trudeau appears to be the only reveller wearing makeup. On Thursday morning, Global News released an undated, low resolution video of Mr Trudeau wearing blackface, raising his hands in the air and sticking out his tongue. The Liberal party confirmed it shortly afterwards. “Wearing brownface is an act of open mockery and racism. It was just as racist in 2001 as it is in 2019,” said opposition Conservative leader Andrew Scheer, adding that the prime minister is “not fit to govern”. Justin Trudeau, 29, wearing a turban and robe, with dark makeup on his hands, face and neck Credit: Time Magazine Addressing the media on his campaign plane on Wednesday, Mr Trudeau admitted he also “wore makeup” while performing Day-O by Harry Belafonte at a high school talent show, taking the number of incidents to three so far. “I’m p—-d off at myself, I’m disappointed in myself,” Mr Trudeau said during his apology. The prime minister said he did not consider it racist at the time, but knows better now. Mr Trudeau dodged a question about whether he should resign, responding: “I think there are people who’ve made mistakes in this life and you make decisions based on what they actually do, what they did, and on a case-by-case basis, I think. I deeply regret that we, that I, did that, I should have known better but I didn’t.” Mr Trudeau is widely seen as a leading exponent of multiculturalism and diversity. Asked four years ago why he had nominated a gender-balanced cabinet, following his landslide election victory, Mr Trudeau famously responded: “Because it’s 2015.” BREAKING: A video — obtained exclusively by Global News — shows a third instance of Justin Trudeau in what appears to be racist makeup.cdnpolielxn43https://t.co/1WNWm9QPat— Globalnews.ca (@globalnews) 19 September 2019 “This is the Trudeau brand imploding,” said Stephanie Chouinard, professor of politics at Queen’s University, of the images. Popular support for Mr Trudeau has slumped this year following accusations he pressured his former attorney-general, Jody Wilson-Raybould, to drop a criminal probe into engineering giant SNC-Lavalin. The company, which is accused of handing out bribes worth C$ 47.7m to Libyan officials between 2001 and 2011, employs more than 3,000 workers in Quebec, where Mr Trudeau's own electoral riding of Papineau lies. In August, independent ethics commissioner Mario Dion accused the prime minister of violating Canada's ethics laws, while the Royal Canadian Mounted Police has reportedly been in contact with Ms Wilson-Raybould – who was expelled from the Liberal caucus in April – to discuss the matter.  Heading into the October 21 election, Mr Trudeau is currently tied with Conservative Mr Scheer in the polls. With little public support for either candidate, the Liberal party has attempted to fight the election on social issues, accusing Mr Scheer of having archaic views on abortion and same-sex marriage and digging up dirt on conservative candidates. “Trudeau has not been shy about contrasting his party’s image with that of the conservative party,” said Ms Chouinard. Against that backdrop, many Canadians will see hypocrisy in Mr Trudeau’s blackface revelations. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau apologises for wearing brownface makeup in 2001 Credit: Reuters Jagmeet Singh, leader of the third-place NDP, called the image insulting. “It’s about every young person mocked for the colour of their skin,” tweeted Mr Singh, who himself wears a turban. West Point Grey Academy is one of several elite Vancouver private schools, catering to wealthy families in British Columbia, with annual fees of C$ 23,490. Exclusive. Sources have confirmed to me that this is THE picture of ⁦@JustinTrudeau⁩ in blackface from high school that he referenaced in his press conference. From the year book at Brebeuf college. cdnpoli He is singing Day Oh apparently. pic.twitter.com/ivBPoxbXi8— Evan Solomon (@EvanLSolomon) September 19, 2019 Profile | Justin Trudeau The gala Mr Trudeau attended – which also featured belly dancing, according to a 2001 school newsletter in 2001 – raised approximately $ 160,000 for the academy. Earlier this year across Canada’s southern border, Virginia governor Ralph Northam refused to resign after admitting he had worn blackface, following the release of a yearbook photo. The Liberal Party did not respond to The Telegraph’s request for comment.



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Joe Biden: Racism is a 'white man's problem' that is institutional in the U.S.

Joe Biden: Racism is a 'white man's problem' that is institutional in the U.S.During an interview that focused largely on issues related to race, Biden said "white folks are the reason why there's institutional racism."



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US homeland security chief: Racism is fueling some terrorism

US homeland security chief: Racism is fueling some terrorismWhite supremacist ideology is helping fuel domestic terrorism in the United States, the head of Homeland Security said Tuesday. Acting Secretary Kevin K. McAleenan appeared in Jackson, Mississippi, for a forum about preventing violence against religious groups. "The attack in El Paso and the violent white supremacist ideology that inspired it offends us all," McAleenan said Tuesday.



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El Paso crowd decries racism week after mass shooting

El Paso crowd decries racism week after mass shootingMore than 100 people marched through the Texas border city of El Paso on Saturday, denouncing racism and calling for stronger gun laws one week after 22 people were killed in a mass shooting that authorities say was carried out by a man targeting Mexicans. Chanting “gun reform now,” ” El Paso strong” and “aquí estamos y no nos vamos” — Spanish for “here we are and we are not leaving” — the marchers included Hispanic, white and black people dressed in white to symbolize peace and carrying 22 white wooden crosses to represent the victims of the shooting at an El Paso Walmart. The man charged in with capital murder in the attack, 21-year-old Patrick Crusius told investigators he targeted Mexicans at the store with an AK-47 rifle, an El Paso detective said in an arrest affidavit.



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Trump Spokesperson Hogan Gidley Attacks Obama for Condemning Racism

Trump Spokesperson Hogan Gidley Attacks Obama for Condemning RacismWhite House spokesperson Hogan Gidley became visibly agitated on Tuesday when Fox News host Melissa Francis brought up what she called a “somewhat veiled jab” from former President Barack Obama following the pair of mass shootings that have rocked the nation over these past few days. “We should soundly reject language coming out of the mouths of any of our leaders that feeds a climate of fear and hatred or normalizes racist sentiments,” Obama wrote, “leaders who demonize those who don't look like us, or suggest that other people, including immigrants, threaten our way of life, or refer to other people as sub-human, or imply that America belongs to just one certain type of people.” Though he didn’t mention President Donald Trump by name, Gidley could only assume that those words referred to his boss. “If only Barack Obama were in a place to make a difference at some point in his life,” Gidley said, sarcastically. “Oh, wait a minute, he was the president of the United States.” “For him to interject himself into this conversation, this debate, at this point, it’s his right to do it,” he continued. “But the fact is, Donald Trump is the president of all Americans. He’s trying to move this country forward, and comments like that take us backward and take us to a dark place that we never want to be and we never want to visit again.”CNN’s Christiane Amanpour Relentlessly Grills Kellyanne Conway on Trump’s Role in ShootingsDuring an appearance earlier in the day on Fox & Friends, White House counselor Kellyanne Conway took a similar stab at Obama, saying, “No one blamed him for Newtown, Connecticut., and he had his opportunity to go heal the nation.”Even Trump himself couldn’t help but respond to Obama’s general condemnation of racism on Twitter, taking it all too personally. Paraphrasing Fox & Friends host Brian Kilmeade, Trump tweeted, “‘Did George Bush ever condemn President Obama after Sandy Hook. President Obama had 32 mass shootings during his reign. Not many people said Obama is out of Control. Mass shootings were happening before the President even thought about running for Pres.’” Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.



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Trump condemns white supremacy, racism after shootings

Trump condemns white supremacy, racism after shootingsPresident Donald Trump on Monday denounced white supremacist extremism and racism and said mass murderers should be “quickly” executed in a strongly worded response to two gun massacres over the weekend. Facing a blizzard of accusations that his own anti-immigrant rhetoric has fueled radicals across the country, Trump used his live address from the White House to issue an unusually direct condemnation of racists. Trump’s statement, responding to massacres in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio, was markedly different from his usual line minimizing the dangers of white supremacist attacks.



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Atlanta's confederate monuments: how do ‘context markers’ help explain racism?

Atlanta's confederate monuments: how do ‘context markers’ help explain racism?Symbols dedicated to the south’s soldiers have come under debate for not mentioning their roots in racial segregationThe Peace monument in Piedmont Park in Atlanta depicts a Confederate soldier halted by an angel. It was defaced in 2017 after the protests in Charlottesville, Virginia. Photograph: David Goldman/Associated PressAtlanta’s monuments to its Confederate past cannot be taken down by law. But the city is now moving to provide much-needed historical context on the realities of slavery, the civil war and the era of Jim Crow segregation that followed.Homages to Atlanta’s history crop up in many cemeteries and parks. Little context accompanies those stone memorials with engraved plaques referring to “heroic efforts” and the south’s soldiers’ efforts to “unite” the country after the civil war. There is no mention of racism or slavery and segregation.But now, Atlanta is placing four new context markers near some of the statues and monuments that will offer a fuller and more honest accounting of the south’s history and its legacy of slavery and racism.One marker will go up near the 1935-constructed Peachtree Battle Avenue monument, a simple stone engraved memorial commemorating an 1864 civil war battle stressing peace between the north and south. The new additional panel next to it will point out flaws in the monument’s inscription by saying: “[It] describes the United States after the civil war as a perfected nation. This ignores the segregation and disenfranchisement of African Americans and others that still existed in 1935.”Another marker, at the Peace monument, built in 1911 in the midst of one of Atlanta’s most popular parks, is a large statue of a Confederate soldier halted by an angel. The original plaque explains how a Confederate-era city militia was on a peace mission to unite America after the civil war. The added marker explains how it excludes 200,000 African Americans who served in the US army.Both monuments stress unity between the north and south in the wake of the civil war, but neither plaque commemorating the Confederacy mentions the reason for the war: pro-slavery southern states advocated for secession, wanting to continue the enslavement of African Americans.Both were erected not during the civil war or shortly after, but during the era of Jim Crow laws, enforcing racial segregation.“There’s a lot of people don’t understand these monuments were not really put up right after the civil war,” Heidi Bierich, the director of the Innocence Project at the Southern Poverty Law Center, explained. “[Confederate monuments] were assertions of when white people were gaining more power under Jim Crow, or the Klan in the 1920s. So it was a big old, you know: ‘I reject civil rights, I reject black rights.’”Two other monuments in the Oakland cemetery – the Confederate obelisk and the Lion of the Confederacy – will also have markers to contextualize their continued placement on state-owned property. Both are some of the oldest Confederate symbols in the city, with the latter built in 1895 placing an enormous lion statue in the middle of a cemetery of thousands of unmarked Confederate graves. The Confederate obelisk, a looming stone pillar, is the tallest, most prominent focus of the Confederate part of the cemetery.Advocates for these new markers, like Bierich, say the new information panels are more truthful because now visitors won’t see a Confederate monument without having some other narrative.They are necessary because a local political struggle over the fate of the monuments ended with them being protected by law, even as some other southern communities took down their Confederate statues.However, Atlanta’s National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) president Richard Rose said the city shouldn’t have compromised on the monuments. “You can’t contextualize racism or compromise on racism,” he said, adding that these markers “establish that racism is valid”.In 2017, the city’s then mayor Kasim Reed formed a committee to review street names and city-owned monuments, just months after white nationalists rallied in Charlottesville in protest at the removal of a statue of Confederate general Robert E Lee. Some of those marching had carried white power symbols as a car smashed into anti-racism protesters, killing Heather Heyer.Though the debate around memorials to Confederate history has continued since the violent rallies in Virginia, the 2015 shooting by Dylann Roof at a black church in South Carolina ignited the debate after the gunman posted pictures with the Confederate flag. South Carolina removed the flag from its statehouse grounds, but kept its monuments.The committee advised that Confederate monuments in Georgia be moved to storage, but a recent law signed by Republican governor Brian Kemp makes it illegal to remove any monument on property owned by the state. The NAACP denounced the law, saying the monuments “glorify treason and a hateful history of black subjugation, reinforced through domestic terrorism”.Alabama, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia, according to the SPLC, also have similar laws in place to protect Confederate monuments from removal.Of the seven states banning the removal of Confederate monuments, Atlanta is the only city within them to add context via plaques.Sheffield Hale, president and chief executive of the Atlanta History Center, said the markers – paid for in part by the center – help address the issue, but they are not a permanent solution.“I do think it gives [people] a starting point, which is sorely needed right now, in our society, as a way to deal with contentious issues. Let’s argue about the facts, let’s put them down on paper – or on a marker – and have a conversation about them,” he said.The final line to be added alongside the Peace monument is certain to do just that.“This monument should no longer stand as a memorial to white brotherhood; rather, it should be seen as an artifact representing a shared history in which millions of Americans were denied civil and human rights,” it says.But just miles from downtown Atlanta, the largest memorial of the Confederacy in the US still looms over the city with no context and a laser light show highlighting the state’s most visited attraction. That is Stone Mountain, where families picnic under the gaze of a gigantic carving of Confederate leaders.



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Siemens boss says Trump is becoming ‘face of racism and exclusion’ in searing rebuke of president

Siemens boss says Trump is becoming ‘face of racism and exclusion’ in searing rebuke of presidentDonald Trump is turning into the "face of racism and exclusion" following his attacks targeting four congresswomen of colour, the chief executive of Siemens has said.In one of the sharpest rebukes from a major business leader against the president, Joe Kaeser, who leads the German industrial giant, responded to a news article about a Trump rally in North Carolina last week, when supporters directed a hostile chant towards Democrat Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, yelling "Send her back!"The president had earlier targeted Ms Omar, who was born in Somalia and is a naturalized US citizen, in a racist tweet, saying on Twitter that she and three other Democrats, Rashida Tlaib of Michigan, Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, should "go back" to "the crime infested places from which they came"."I find it depressing that the most important political office in the world is turning into the face of racism and exclusion," Mr Kaeser said on Twitter."I have lived in the USA for many years, experiencing freedom, tolerance and openness as never before."Mr Kaeser has previously used his position as the head of one of Europe's most powerful manufacturers to take a stand on political issues.Last year, he backed out of an investment conference in Saudi Arabia following the killing of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul.Despite his own attacks, Mr Trump has since attempted to distance himself from the crowd's chant, claiming that he tried to stop it by "speaking very quickly".In fact, Mr Trump paused for 13 seconds during the rally to let the chant continue.While business executives have criticised Mr Trump's policies and rhetoric in his two and a half years in office, including opposition to the administration's family separation policy at the southern US border, the recoil against the president's latest derogatory remarks have come mainly from US lawmakers and world leaders.The leaders of the UK, Canada and New Zealand were among those denouncing Mr Trump's comments. Mr Kaeser's compatriot, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, said she "stands in solidarity" with the congresswomen Mr Trump targeted on Twitter."In my view, the strength of America lies in that people from different (origins) contributed to what makes the country great," she said at a news conference last week, according to Business Insider.While some of Mr Trump's political allies have condemned the chant, they have been careful not to directly denounce the president."The chants were offensive and very unfortunate, and it did not speak well of that crowd," said Utah senator Mitt Romney, who was the Republican Party's 2012 nominee for president."I've said what I believe about the president's responsibility in this regard, which is, I believe he has a special responsibility to unite Americans regardless of our ethnicity, race, national origin, and feel that he failed in that regard."The Washington Post



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