Tag Archives: Qaeda

A cartoonist with a $100,000 Al Qaeda bounty on his head for drawing the Prophet Muhammad as a dog died when a truck crashed into his car


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A cartoonist with a $100,000 Al Qaeda bounty on his head for drawing the Prophet Muhammad as a dog died when a truck crashed into his car


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Yemen civil war continues as al Qaeda strengthens its presence in the region


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Video shows BBC reporter looking stunned when Lindsey Grahams said the US would reinvade Afghanistan to fight Al Qaeda


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Pentagon quickly refutes Biden’s claim al Qaeda is no longer in Afghanistan


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Israel’s stunning assassination of an Al Qaeda chief inside Iran suggests a major deal was cut with the US


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What Baghdadi’s Death Means for Al Qaeda. And Why It Matters.

What Baghdadi’s Death Means for Al Qaeda. And Why It Matters.SITE Intelligence GroupWith ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi killed one day and the group’s official spokesman Abu Hassan al-Muhajir the next, there’s a giant hole in the pseudo-Caliphate structure of the so-called Islamic State. The group must now, by its strict religious tenets, find a new (supposed) descendant of the Prophet Muhammed to fill the role of Caliph. But the deaths of those two are equally consequential for al-Qaeda, the bitter rival of ISIS for leadership of global jihad. Al-Qaeda has spent the last six years branding the Caliphate as illegitimate, too extreme, and ultimately harmful. When ISIS declared the establishment of its so-called Caliphate spanning territory in Syria and Iraq in 2014, al-Qaeda and its affiliates unanimously rejected it. To this day, al-Qaeda leader Ayman al-Zawahiri’s speeches rarely come without some critique of the “epidemic” put forth by ISIS.Trump Officials Had No Clue Where He Got ‘Whimpering’ Detail in His Baghdadi Raid AccountOddly, Baghdadi was killed in Idlib, a haven of al-Qaeda-linked fighters and Hayat Tahrir al-Sham, a Syrian Islamist faction led by Abu Muhammad al-Julani, a former al-Qaeda comrade who had become one of Baghdadi's most bitter foes. There has been some speculation Baghdadi was not just hiding out, but trying to recruit from the ranks for his enemies.Neither al-Qaeda Central nor its affiliates have commented on Baghdadi’s death as yet, but within hours after the news broke, al-Qaeda ideologues and supporters already were celebrating the event and discussing what it will mean for the future of jihad. In chat groups online, al-Qaeda supporters voiced resentment after years of bitter strife with the group, and the scale of these responses illustrates just how much of a big deal and opportunity they see with Baghdadi’s death.“Based on his orders, thousands of the mujahideen were killed,” one post read.“How thrilled were they every time leaders from al-Qaeda were martyred?” read another.Some wished Baghdadi the ultimate condemnation:  “May Allah send him to Hell.”Messages by others, however, particularly al-Qaeda-linked ideologues, balanced expressions of justice for the jihadi movement with restraint, making sure not to celebrate excessively the result of an operation by the United States.The tactful enthusiasm is calculated. Many ISIS fighters, much of its military infrastructure, many media officials, and supporters were pulled from al-Qaeda. Now, with ISIS’ “Caliph” dead and that Caliphate itself destroyed, al-Qaeda has been given its biggest opportunity yet to bring many of them back under its tent. SITE Intelligence GroupPerhaps the most profound instance of this outreach was a lengthy essay by “Adel Amin,” the pen name of a prominent ideologue linked to the Shabaab al-Mujahideen Movement, al-Qaeda’s branch in Somalia and most powerful affiliate. The message, disseminated widely across al-Qaeda-supporting channels and chat groups (many of which are also frequented by pro-ISIS users), demanded that ISIS supporters “return to the road of righteousness” after the Islamic State, in all of its excessive aggression and delusions of destiny, has proven itself a failure. Amin wrote:The situation here is not one in which to gloat. It is a situation for reminding and calling on those who remained in the ranks of al-Baghdadi, to reconsider…Indeed, we witnessed its back being broken, its leaders getting killed, and its banner falling, and we hope that we can witness whoever remains from its soldiers returning to righteousness.Statements by other ideologues and supporters voiced the same points. A statement by Sirajuddin Zurayqat, a former religious official in the now-defunct al-Qaeda-linked Brigades of Abdullah Azzam in Lebanon, urged: “Now [Baghdadi] is dead and there is not one from the Ummah grieving over him or giving condolences. … Therefore, those who were deceived by him should reconsider before it is too late!”These messages echo the same calls heard from Zawahiri and al-Qaeda affiliates over the years calling on ISIS fighters to “repent” and leave the group. Yet despite these new circumstances, ISIS supporters will not easily be moved. Since the summer of 2016, the group’s followers have seen the loss of the major cities Mosul in Iraq and Raqqah in Syria as well as the death of revered ISIS figures like Omar Shishani, Abu Muhammad al-‘Adnani, and others. With the latest setbacks to its leadership, ISIS-linked accounts online already have poured out calls to stay steadfast and have even used Baghdadi’s death as a rallying point to carry out new attacks. Reinforcing this undeterred support is an ISIS military and media machine that has shown no sign of stopping in the last two days. While ISIS has not yet officially acknowledged the death of Baghdadi, it has continued reporting on day-to-day military activity across Iraq, Syria, and the Afghanistan-Pakistan region.ISIS' Yemen Province – AQAP Prisoners as Featured in the video “He Who Starts is More Unjust”SITE Intelligence GroupFurthermore, while al-Qaeda affiliates like the Shabaab serve as powerful representatives of the organization, al-Qaeda Central is weaker than it has ever been. These days, al-Qaeda Central’s role is largely symbolic, limited to leadership messages and other content while steering the big-picture ethos of the organization. Its attempts to bolster its image, already heavily weighed down by a less-than-charismatic leader in Zawahiri, were upended upon the death of Hamza bin Laden, the son of Osama, whom al-Qaeda likely was grooming for an eventual leadership position. These variables considered, al-Qaeda may not be the appealing alternative for jihadists that its supporters want it to seem. So, while some fighters might very well join the ranks of al-Qaeda affiliates in their region, we shouldn't expect to see any drastic migration from ISIS’ ranks into its rival’s.Despite any notions of good-riddance that al-Qaeda and its supporters attach to Baghdadi’s death, and for whatever number of defectors it may win over as a result of Baghdadi’s demise, ISIS is not going anywhere. The barriers between these terrorist organizations have only hardened over the years, fueling deadly clashes and jihadi PR wars. Baghdadi was not the sole barrier keeping ISIS members from joining al-Qaeda, and his death is unlikely to diminish existing disputes.How U.S. Commandos IDed a ‘Mutilated’ Baghdadi So QuicklyRead more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.



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'Alcaida': Al Qaeda spelled wrong on Trump's notes for remarks made attacking Ilhan Omar and other freshman Democrats

'Alcaida': Al Qaeda spelled wrong on Trump's notes for remarks made attacking Ilhan Omar and other freshman DemocratsTrump was using the notes to defend racist tweets he sent the day before about four Democratic lawmakers, including Rep. Ilhan Omar.



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Pentagon confirms Qaeda higher-up killed in Libya strike

Pentagon confirms Qaeda higher-up killed in Libya strikeA senior Al-Qaeda operative and another jihadist were killed in a US air strike in Libya, the Pentagon confirmed Wednesday. The March 24 strike near Ubari in southern Libya killed “two Al-Qaeda terrorists, including Musa Abu Dawud, a high-ranking Al-Qaeda in the Lands of the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) official,” the US military’s Africa Command said in a statement.



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Hezbollah and Al Qaeda exchange dead bodies of 14 fighters after ceasefire 

Hezbollah and Al Qaeda exchange dead bodies of 14 fighters after ceasefire Two militant groups were due to exchange bodies on Sunday after fierce fighting in a region of Lebanon that borders Syria.  Hezbollah, a Shiite group that is an ally of both the Lebanese and Syrian governments, and Jabhat Fatel al Sham, a Syrian jihadi group linked to al Qaeda, swapped the dead in a deal facilitated by the Lebanese government.  The two groups had been fighting in the mountainous region of Arsal after Hezbollah launched an offensive aimed at driving back Jabhat Fateh al Sham over the border to Syria.  Lebanon's Hezbollah movement and jihadist militants began implementing a ceasefire deal for the Syria-Lebanon border, with an exchange of bodies of fighters killed in week-long clashes Credit: STRINGER/AFP/Getty Images A ceasefire between the two groups came into effect on Thursday after Jabhat Fateh al Sham agreed to move its fighters and their families to Idlib, in Syria.  The War Media Centre, an Arabic-language Twitter account affiliated with Hezbollah, said that nine bodies of Jabhat Fateh al Sham fighters would be handed over, and bodies of five Hezbollah fighters would be received in return.  In a televised speech on Wednesday, Hezbollah's leader, Hasan Nasrallah, said that his group "was in the face of a very big military victory" in Arsal.   A Hezbollah ambulance carrying the coffins of bodies of Nusra Front fighters in Labwe, Lebanon Credit: Reuters handout  Al Jazeera reported that two dozen Hezbollah fighters died during the fighting, and that 150 Jabhat Fateh al Sham fighters had been killed.  In 2014, Lebanese soldiers were taken hostage by jihadists in Arsal, leading to the outbreak of serious fighting in the town. Four soldiers were later executed. Sporadic fighting between the army and the jihadists has continued since then.  Hezbollah took journalists on a tour of the newly captured areas yesterday, and showed them an array of military hardware. The victory, and its presentation to the press, are signs of the confidence of power of the group. Lebanon's President, Michel Aoun, is a political ally of Hezbollah.  



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