Tag Archives: protect

Trump vows to protect 2nd Amendment after gun briefing

Trump vows to protect 2nd Amendment after gun briefingPresident Donald Trump pledged Thursday to protect the Second Amendment, hours after huddling with top advisers to discuss gun control measures he might be willing to publicly stand behind. Speaking to reporters before flying to Baltimore for a Republican retreat, Trump insisted “a lot of progress” had been made on background checks “and various things having to do with guns” during Thursday’s discussion.



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Police Fire Tear Gas to Protect China Office: Hong Kong Update

Police Fire Tear Gas to Protect China Office: Hong Kong Update(Bloomberg) — Hong Kong police once again used tear gas against protesters trying to attack China’s main representation office, capping a weekend of violent demonstrations across the city that mark the ninth week of civil unrest in the Asian financial capital.Riot police used gas to deter hundreds of black-clad protesters, many wearing hard hats, goggles and gas masks, from approaching the China liaison office in Sai Wan on Sunday. Protesters then migrated to Causeway Bay, a bustling shopping and dining area, and set up barricades that were blocking one of the busiest roadways in the city.Earlier marchers massed in Tseung Kwan O, in the city’s New Territories, and surrounded the district police station, pelting it with projectiles and breaking windows.On Saturday, thousands converged in Kowloon, where police used tear gas to try to disperse crowds and re-open blocked roads. Police stations came under attack there as demonstrators hurled projectiles at them and set fires.The violence, including arson and blockading major roads, “crosses the line” of peaceful and rational protests and cannot be tolerated, the Hong Kong government said in a statement Sunday. The city is reaching a “very dangerous” point, the statement said. The government also urged people not to join a planned general strike on Monday, saying it would hurt the economy and increase the risk of a recession.China’s official Xinhua News Agency said in a commentary on Sunday that China’s central government would not sit back and let the situation continue.The protest movement that began as weekend marches has shifted form and become a part of daily life, with disquiet growing in the Asian financial hub. Dozens of people appeared in court last week on a colonial-era rioting charge that carries a 10-year prison term — signaling the city’s Beijing-backed government is heeding calls for a stronger response, bolstered by support from Chinese authorities.Demonstrations began nearly nine weeks ago over opposition to legislation easing extraditions to China, and demands have since widened to include Chief Executive Carrie Lam’s resignation, the release of people detained at previous protests and an inquiry into the police’s use of force.Sunday marches kick off (6 p.m.)Two marches kicked off on Sunday afternoon, one on the western side of Hong Kong island and the other in the New Territories district of Tseung Kwan O.The New Territories attracted thousands who moved directly to the local police station. Some protesters hurled projectiles at the building, breaking windows and drawing a warning from police that the crowd would be dispersed. Police issued a statement advising the public to leave the area immediately.The island march started at the expat-friendly residential neighborhood of Kennedy Town and was scheduled to end at Sun Yat Sen Memorial Park in Sai Ying Pun.One of the protesters in Kennedy Town, 61-year-old church secretary Danny Yuen, said he was worried that the clashes could lead to serious injuries or death, which would “affect society’s stability.”“I don’t like to see the violence, I’d like to see a peaceful way to engage with the government, but the government is forcing this way onto people,” he said. “If the government would retract the bill, it would reduce tensions.”China won’t sit back (11 a.m.)Police said in a statement Sunday that at least 20 vehicles were damaged and officers’ safety was put at risk when protesters hurled bricks and other objects into the station with “large catapults.” When police dispersed the crowd some protesters hurled petrol bombs and other objects at officers, who fired tear gas to try to quell the violence, police said.At least 20 people were arrested for offenses including unlawful assembly and assault, according to the statement.Xinhua said in a commentary that the central government would not sit back and let the situation continue, while reiterating that it’s sticking to the one country, two systems regime. The news agency warned “evil forces which are trying to challenge the central government’s authority, to destroy the one country, two systems bottom line” that they will be judged by history.The report accused protesters of throwing a Chinese national flag into the sea in an act that is an insult to all Chinese nationals including Hong Kong residents.Two marches are planned for Sunday afternoon, one in the western side of Hong Kong island, ending in the area near China’s liaison office; the other in the New Territories neighborhood of Tseung Kwan O.Government Condemns Acts of Protesters (2:16 a.m.)The Hong Kong government in a statement expressed regret over what it termed protesters’ “violent” and “radical” actions, including barricading major roads in the Yau Tsim Mong district and the entrance to the Cross Harbor Tunnel. It said the actions went beyond what a “civilized society” considers freedom of expression. “We express regret over such behaviors which are illegal and disregard the public order and the needs of other members of the public.” Acts that defaced the national flag were also condemned.Wong Tai Sin residents tear-gassed (Sunday, 12:05 a.m.)Police fired tear gas in Wong Tai Sin, a residential area with mostly public housing named for the nearby temple of the same name. Many were apparently local residents without gas masks or hard hats. They were angry at riot police who made arrests earlier on, including of at least one elderly person. Many remained on the streets as confrontations continued. Hundreds of protesters returned and encircled a police station in the Prince Edward neighborhood.Police use tear gas in Mong Kok (Saturday, 10:38 p.m.)Police fired tear gas in the densely populated neighborhood of Mong Kok for the first time since the start of the protests seven weeks ago. Lines of riot police faced off against demonstrators who had blocked Nathan Road, a main commercial thoroughfare. Police made progress in clearing many of the demonstrators, though some appeared to have entered into other neighborhoods with a thinner police presence.A large number of protesters remained in neighboring Tsim Sha Tsui, even after police fired several rounds of tear gas there to try dispel the demonstrators.Tear gas fired in Tsim Sha Tsui (Saturday 9:15 p.m.)Police fired tear gas to dispel protesters who had surrounded a police station in the Tsim Sha Tsui area, a shopping district that attracts many Chinese tourists. Protesters had set a fire near the station and hurled bricks at the outpost. Demonstrators had also blocked Nathan Road, the main thoroughfare in Kowloon, from Tsim Sha Tsui to Mong Kok. Riot police were also out in number trying to clear protesters from the Mong Kok district.Cross-Harbour Tunnel barricaded (Saturday 7 p.m.)Marchers from a rally in Mong Kok broke up into groups with some heading toward the shopping district of Tsim Sha Tsui, where they took over the waterfront Canton Road. Some protesters set up barricades blocking the entrance to the Cross Harbor Tunnel, a busy route for vehicles, TV footage showed. Authorities cleared the barricades but traffic was backed up in a huge jam on the Hong Kong Island side of the tunnel.Organizers said 120,000 people attended the anti-government march, while police estimated that 4,200 were on the originally agreed route for the rally.One city, two rallies (Saturday 3 p.m.)Anti-government protesters gathered in a park in the Kowloon area for a 1.5 kilometer (about 1 mile) march to the Mong Kong district on a route approved by police. The park was overflowing with thousands of demonstrators spilling into the streets as police kept a low profile.In Causeway Bay, across the harbor on the Hong Kong Island side, thousands protesters congregated in Victoria Park in support of the police. Organizers said 90,000 people took part, while the media reported police as saying 26,000 attended.One of the demonstrators, who would only give her name as Ms Fung, accused the media of supporting protesters.“If the news is beneficial to the people clad in black, they report it,” she said. The protesters don’t realize the harm they’re inflicting on the economy, she said. “The police are very good compared to other countries.”Lam Attends Event (Friday 8:50 p.m.)Hong Kong’s embattled leader attended a cocktail reception celebrating the upcoming 70th anniversary of the People’s Republic of China at the Hong Kong Cultural Center. Some 20 black-clad protesters waited for her, Radio Television Hong Kong reported. Afterward, she didn’t answer questions from protesters and media about the civil servants’ rally as she was escorted away by bodyguards. People called out to her: “Have you ever responded to us?” “You are ignoring public opinion.” “Do you agree you are hiding?”‘To Voice My Opinion’ (8:15 p.m.)“I am worried about the future of Hong Kong. We are being China-fied after all, despite the promise of ‘one country, two systems.’ I will keep coming out because I am so worried,” said Ms Fung, a 60-year-old retired civil servant who worked as a clerk in the police commissioner’s office for more than 20 years and declined to give her first name. “I want to come out and show that it’s not just the young people and the people who are protesting that are against Carrie Lam, the extradition bill, and the police violence.”Earlier in the evening, organizers played a video on a jumbo screen that summarized weeks of protests. When it came to July 21 attacks on marchers by unidentified white-shirted men at a train station in the suburb of Yuen Long, some people wept.My department “serves Hong Kong people,” said Alan Cheung, 28, who works for the city’s fire services department and came to the protest in a black shirt. “What happened in Yuen Long station and the police, what they do, is injustice.”“I come to this protest to voice my opinion,” Cheung said.Civil Servant Rally (7:30 p.m.)Thousands of people poured into centrally located Chater Garden after work for a planned civil servants’ protest, some of them chanting the popular Chinese saying “add oil,” a refrain of this movement that means to add fuel. The crowds flooded onto adjoining Chater Road as black-shirted demonstrators continued to join the gathering.Anticipating the rally, the government on Thursday night released a statement saying its civil servants must uphold their “political neutrality.”Protesters’ Next PlansA general strike and seven accompanying rallies called for Monday across the city are gaining traction in protester forums. They call for peaceful “non co-operation actions” at three busy metro stations at 7:30 a.m., as rush hour kicks off: Lai King, Diamond Hill and Fortress Hill. The strike begins hours later, at 1 p.m., with gatherings in Tuen Mun, Tseun Wan, Tai Po, Sha Tin, Mong Kok, Wong Tai Sin and Admiralty, which houses government offices and has been ground zero for weeks of mass marches.About 450 employees from both Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd. and Hong Kong Airlines Ltd. said they will take part in Monday’s strike, Apple Daily reported Saturday, citing unidentified people.More than 300 Cathay Pacific and Cathay Dragon employees, including pilots, flight attendants and support staff, and about 150 from Hong Kong Airlines have expressed support for the civil action, the paper said. The employees who want to take part may take leave or call in sick, Apple Daily reported.(Updates with tear gas being fired near China liaison office.)\–With assistance from Sheryl Tian Tong Lee, Kari Lindberg, Alfred Liu, Anjali Cordeiro and Natalie Lung.To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Karen Leigh in Hong Kong at kleigh4@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.net, Brian Wingfield, James AmottFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.



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Dan Coats resignation: Trump values leaders who protect him over those who defend America

Dan Coats resignation: Trump values leaders who protect him over those who defend AmericaBy pushing John Ratcliffe to replace Dan Coats, Trump is signaling, again, that he values leaders who protect him over those who defend America.



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Dan Coats resignation: Trump values leaders who protect him over those who defend America

Dan Coats resignation: Trump values leaders who protect him over those who defend AmericaBy pushing John Ratcliffe to replace Dan Coats, Trump is signaling, again, that he values leaders who protect him over those who defend America.



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When ICE Tried to Arrest an Undocumented Man in Tennessee, Neighbors and a Network of Volunteers Formed a Human Chain to Protect Him

When ICE Tried to Arrest an Undocumented Man in Tennessee, Neighbors and a Network of Volunteers Formed a Human Chain to Protect HimThe man was with his 12-year-old son



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“We Can Stop All of You:” Air Force Warns that They Are Ready to Protect Area 51

“We Can Stop All of You:” Air Force Warns that They Are Ready to Protect Area 51It started as a bit of a joke, but now the US Air Force (USAF) has told people not to go near Area 51.As we have reported last week more than a million people have RSVP’d to an event on Facebook, planning a raid on Area 51 in southern Nevada to “see them aliens.”The event, titled, “Storm Area 51, They Can’t Stop All of Us,” would see a group of alien hunters meeting at 3 a.m. on Sep. 20, 2019 near the top-secret USAF Base to coordinate a plan of attack to reveal the truth behind the curtain. Thousands have commented on the page, which reads: “We will ‘Naruto run’ with our arms stretched behind us like Naruto Uzumaki in the Japanese anime series “Naruto.” We can move faster than their bullets.”A spokeswoman for the Air Force has told The Washington Post it is “ready to protect America and its assets”.Facebook user Jackson Barnes wrote on the event page: “Hello US government, this is a joke, and I do not actually intend to go ahead with this plan”.“I just thought it would be funny and get me some thumbsy uppies on the Internet. I’m not responsible if people decide to actually storm area 51.”But the Air Force isn’t seeing the funny side.



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U.S. demands Iran free seized ship, vows to protect Gulf oil lifeline

U.S. demands Iran free seized ship, vows to protect Gulf oil lifelineThe United States on Thursday demanded Iran immediately release a vessel it seized in the Gulf and a U.S. military commander in the region said the United States would work “aggressively” to ensure free passage of vessels through the vital waterway. Responding to an announcement by Iran’s Revolutionary Guards that they had seized a foreign tanker smuggling fuel, the U.S. State Department insisted Iran had to free the ship and its crew and stop harassing vessels in and around the Strait of Hormuz.



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Why Canada Must Protect its 5G Networks from Huawei

Why Canada Must Protect its 5G Networks from HuaweiThe introduction of 5G technology, along with its promise and challenges, has led to a transformational debate in Canada—as it has amongst many of Ottawa’s partners and allies around the world. Front and centre for Canada is the potential role of Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei in such a next generation network. In order to address this question, the government of Canada has been conducting an intensive security review—which remains ongoing—on the implications of potentially including Huawei in its 5G networks.Magnifying the stakes of the looming verdict on Huawei, is an increasingly troubled relationship between China and Canada. Two Canadian citizens—Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor—remain arbitrarily detained in China since last December. Beijing accuses the two of stealing state secrets and guilty of espionage, but fails to produce any evidence to support such a claim. Kovrig and Spavor were arrested nine days after Canada’s arrest, on extradition request from the United States, of Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou. Despite China’s attempts to downplay any linkage, it is clear that this was no coincidence and unfortunately the fates of Kovrig and Spavor have been unfairly tied to the extradition case of Meng. They have also rebuffed high-level Canadian efforts to have a dialogue on the matter.



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Seeking unity, Pelosi calls for bill to protect migrant kids

Seeking unity, Pelosi calls for bill to protect migrant kidsLawmakers must pass legislation easing “abhorrent conditions” facing children held at the southern border, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Monday as she tried taking the offensive on an issue that badly split Democrats and has raised questions about their unity on other issues. Pelosi, D-Calif., tried rallying Democrats against a common foe — Republicans led by President Donald Trump — less than two weeks after a $ 4.6 billion border bill drove a bitter rift into her party. Although the measure passed Congress easily and became law, many House progressives and Hispanics voted “no” because they said the measure lacked real controls on how the government must handle children, while the party’s moderates and senators said the measure was the best compromise they could craft with the GOP-run Senate.



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Mike Pompeo urges other countries to help protect tankers after Gulf attacks

Mike Pompeo urges other countries to help protect tankers after Gulf attacksSecretary of state says shipping security was not exclusively a US problem and stresses that Trump does not want war with IranWashington has blamed recent attacks on oil tankers in the Gulf of Oman on Iran. Photograph: -/AFP/Getty ImagesThe US secretary of state, Mike Pompeo, has called on other nations to help safeguard tanker traffic in the Persian Gulf following a spate of attacks on ships which Washington blames on Iran.On a visit to US Central Command headquarters, Pompeo said shipping security in the Gulf was not exclusively a US problem.“You have China that depends enormously on energy transiting the Strait of Hormuz. You have South Korea, Indonesia, Japan, all of whom have an enormous interest in ensuring there’s freedom of navigation throughout this waterway,” the secretary of state said.“The United States is prepared to do its part, but every nation that has a deep interest in protecting that shipping lane so that energy can move around the world and support their economies needs to make sure they understand the real threat.”Pompeo added that “President Trump does not want war, and we will continue to communicate that message, while doing the things that are necessary to protect American interests in the region.”In an interview on Tuesday, Trump played down the threat to the US represented by the tanker attacks in the region, which he described as being “very minor”.“Other places get such vast amounts of oil there,” Trump told Time magazine. “We get very little. We have made tremendous progress in the last two and a half years in energy. And when the pipelines get built, we’re now an exporter of energy. So we’re not in the position that we used to be in in the Middle East where … some people would say we were there for the oil.”The Trump administration is seeking to handle the Gulf crisis amid turmoil in its top ranks. The acting defence secretary, Patrick Shanahan, who Trump had nominated to take on the job official, resigned on Tuesday “to devote more time to his family”, according to a Trump tweet.Trump named the army secretary, Mark Esper, to take over as acting defence secretary. The US has not had a Senate-confirmed defence secretary in place since December, when James Mattis resigned.As with his approach to Nato and US Pacific alliances, Trump is focused on persuading allies in the Gulf to shoulder a greater burden in providing security.The US would be able to rely on Gulf Arab support for tanker protection, but enlisting European involvement is complicated by the fact that European governments see the Trump administration as having precipitating the crisis by walking out of the 2015 multilateral nuclear deal with Iran, and imposing an oil and banking embargo on the country.On Tuesday, Pompeo confirmed that the visit to Tehran last week by the Japanese prime minister, Shinzo Abe, was made on Trump’s request.“President Trump had sent … Abe to take a message of his to the leadership in Iran,” the secretary of statem said. Iran’s supreme leader, Ali Khamenei, rejected the proposal of a dialogue with Trump and the two tankers, one of them Japanese-owned, were attacked while Abe was in Tehran.The deputy chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, General Paul Selva also confirmed on Tuesday that the US had been using Swiss and Iraqi channels as well as public messaging to warn Iran off any direct attack on US interests.“To engage [the US reinforcements] would be a miscalculation that would lead to a response,” he said. “We don’t want them to do that. We want them to be clear-eyed in whatever it is they are planning.”He added: “The risks of miscalculation are real.”Iran has denied responsibility for the blasts that hobbled two tankers in the Gulf of Oman on Thursday, but on Tuesday the commander of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) – which the US says carried out the attack with limpet mines – stepped up the threat to ships travelling through the Strait of Hormuz.“These missiles can hit with great precision carriers in the sea,” Brig Gen Hossein Salami said in a televised speech. “These missiles are domestically produced and are difficult to intercept and hit with other missiles.”Anthony Cordesman, a national security analyst at the Centre for Strategic and International Studies, said Arab states in the Gulf could easily help protect tankers with surveillance planes and drones, and could have warplanes at the site of an attack within minutes.Cordesman acknowledged that deep scepticism over US policy towards Iran has made European governments cautious about being drawn into a conflict, but he argued that the presence of a UK and French naval fleet could offer a powerful political deterrent to further attacks.“If what you want is a precondition for negotiations, and cool the situation down, there is an incentive for the UK and France to take part – if what you are doing is deterring attacks and monitoring the situation,” Cordesman said. Nicholas Burns, a former under secretary of state for political affairs, said: “The administration has a credibility problem due to its rash and unwise disavowal of the Iran nuclear deal and its threats to sanction European companies that do business with Iran.”He added: “But Iran is clearly in the wrong in its activities in the Gulf. The administration is right to consider international convoys. And it is in the clear interest of the European allies, as well as some of the Sunni Arab states, to help the US. At risk is commercial energy traffic in a critical international waterway. Europe, especially, should want to see the free flow of oil and gas for its economic wellbeing.”



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