Tag Archives: Ocean

Hawaii volcano: Aerial footage shows rivers of lava flowing to the ocean

Hawaii volcano: Aerial footage shows rivers of lava flowing to the oceanNewly-released aerial footage of the Kilauea volcano in Hawaii shows lava flows that extend to the ocean. The footage, released by the United States Geological Survey, is from an unmanned aerial craft hovering over one of the main fissures. Authorities have warned that even small pieces of molten rock can be fatal.



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Hawaii Evacuation Helicopters on Standby as Third Lava Flow Reaches the Ocean

Hawaii Evacuation Helicopters on Standby as Third Lava Flow Reaches the OceanThe U.S. Marine Corps has sent two helicopters if more evacuations become necessary



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Lava from Hawaii volcano enters ocean from 3 flows

Lava from Hawaii volcano enters ocean from 3 flowsHONOLULU (AP) — Lava entered the ocean from a third flow, marking the third week of a Hawaii volcano eruption that has opened up nearly two dozen vents in rural communities, destroyed dozens of buildings and shot miles-high plumes of ash into the sky.



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Hawaii helicopter evacuation readied as new lava stream hits ocean

Hawaii helicopter evacuation readied as new lava stream hits oceanBy Marco Garcia PAHALA, Hawaii (Reuters) – A third lava flow from Hawaii’s erupting Kilauea volcano streamed into the ocean on Thursday as U.S. Marine Corps helicopters stood by to evacuate a Big Island community should molten rock or huge cracks block its final escape route. Six huge fissures sent rivers of molten rock through a blackened, volcanic wilderness that was once jungle, farmland and rural homes. Kilauea, one of the world’s most active volcanoes, entered the fourth week of what may be an unprecedented, simultaneous eruption at its summit crater and along a six-mile (9.7-km) string of fissures 25 miles (40 km) down its east flank.



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The Latest: 3 lava flows now reaching ocean off Hawaii

The Latest: 3 lava flows now reaching ocean off HawaiiHONOLULU (AP) — The Latest on the eruption of Kilauea volcano on Hawaii's Big Island (all times local):



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Ocean, jungle explosions new risks from Hawaii eruption

Ocean, jungle explosions new risks from Hawaii eruptionBy Jolyn Rosa HONOLULU (Reuters) – Lava from Hawaii’s erupting Kilauea volcano is exploding as it pours into the ocean, shooting rock fragments that are a danger to boaters. Inland, where molten rock is burning through jungle, methane explosions are hurling boulders while toxic gas is reaching some of the highest levels seen in recent times. Lava edged towards a geothermal power plant on Tuesday after destroying an old warehouse near the facility, County of Hawaii Civil Defense said.



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Lava From Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano Has Reached the Pacific Ocean and It's Creating a New Danger

Lava From Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano Has Reached the Pacific Ocean and It's Creating a New DangerThe mix of lava and seawater has created steam laced with hydrochloric acid and fine glass particles that can cause breathing problems



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Dangerous 'laze' forms as Hawaii volcano lava reaches ocean

Dangerous 'laze' forms as Hawaii volcano lava reaches oceanAuthorities in Hawaii have warned of dangerous “laze” fumes as molten lava from the erupting Kilauea volcano reached the Pacific Ocean. Two lava flows “reached the ocean along the southeast Puna coast overnight,” on Hawaii’s Big Island, the US Geological Survey, which monitors volcanoes and earthquakes worldwide, said in a statement Sunday. A crack however opened in the ground under one of the lava channels, “diverting the lava… into underground voids,” the statement said.



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Even The Bottom Of The World's Deepest Ocean Trench Is Not Safe From Plastic Bags

Even The Bottom Of The World's Deepest Ocean Trench Is Not Safe From Plastic BagsAlmost 36,000 feet underwater, near the very bottom of the world's deepest



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SpaceX boat tries to catch pricey rocket nosecone in the Pacific Ocean, but misses

SpaceX boat tries to catch pricey rocket nosecone in the Pacific Ocean, but missesAfter SpaceX successfully blasted three satellites into space early Thursday morning, the company tried to catch the Falcon 9 rocket's expensive nosecone, also known as a fairing, on a ship in the Pacific Ocean. The vessel, named "Mr. Steven," was outfitted with a giant net. According to SpaceX CEO Elon Musk, the boat missed catching the fairing by "a few hundred meters," but he thinks there's a simple fix: Bigger parachutes to better control the parachuting fairing. Missed by a few hundred meters, but fairing landed intact in water. Should be able catch it with slightly bigger chutes to slow down descent. — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) February 22, 2018 The fairing, which sheltered and released the payload during the rocket launch, parachuted down to the Pacific Ocean. A GPS guidance system helped guide the parachute close to the long, outstretched metallic arms of the awaiting ship. Assuming the nosecone is in good shape, SpaceX may still try and retrieve it from the water.  Falcon fairing half as seen from our catcher’s mitt in boat form, Mr. Steven. No apparent damage from reentry and splashdown. A post shared by Elon Musk (@elonmusk) on Feb 22, 2018 at 7:36am PST Recovery of the rocket fairing is aimed at bringing down the cost of access to space, since this particular part of the rocket costs between $ 5 and $ 6 million dollars.  SpaceX famously lands its rocket boosters back on Earth and reuses them in subsequent launches, but it never before attempted to catch a rocket's fairing. SpaceX plans to outcompete its rocket rivals by reusing most of its rockets, as opposing to building new components for each launch.  SEE ALSO: Elon Musk's 'Starman' Tesla Roadster isn't your typical piece of space junk This launch, for example, featured a Falcon 9 rocket booster that had previously been to space in August 2017. SpaceX decided not to recover the rocket for a potential third launch, however.   Going to try to catch the giant fairing (nosecone) of Falcon 9 as it falls back from space at about eight times the speed of sound. It has onboard thrusters and a guidance system to bring it through the atmosphere intact, then releases a parafoil and our ship, named Mr. Steven, with basically a giant catcher’s mitt welded on, tries to catch it. A post shared by Elon Musk (@elonmusk) on Feb 22, 2018 at 6:07am PST Instead, the rocket fell back to Earth and crashed into the Pacific Ocean. According to SpaceX firmware engineer Tom Praderio, "SpaceX is making room for its next iteration of Falcon 9 rockets," so it had no reason to land and reuse the rocket for a third launch.  A screenshot of the Falcon 9 rocket second stage heading towards low-Earth orbit. The curvature of the Earth can be seen in the background.Image: spacexThe Falcon 9 rockets have proven to be quite reliable, as SpaceX launched them into space 18 times last year, with no failures. The company plans to surpass these launch numbers this year.  Besides the primary payload — a Spanish satellite that can capture extremely high-resolution images of Earth — SpaceX launched two of its own microsatellites. These satellites are a test, but likely the first of thousands of internet-beaming satellites called Starlink, which is intended to provide high-speed internet access to the web-deprived corners of the world, sometime in the early to mid 2020s. Today’s Falcon launch carries 2 SpaceX test satellites for global broadband. If successful, Starlink constellation will serve least served. — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) February 21, 2018 The Federal Communications Commission has yet to approve the SpaceX Starlink constellation, but last week FCC chairmen Ajit Pai urged commissioners to approve the bold space internet project.  The PAZ satellite successfully separating from the Falcon 9 rocket.Image: spacex WATCH: Neil DeGrasse Tyson explains what 'shoot for the moon' actually means



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