Tag Archives: Mugabe

Zimbabwe ex-leader Mugabe visits Singapore hospital – sources

Zimbabwe ex-leader Mugabe visits Singapore hospital - sourcesFormer Zimbabwe president Robert Mugabe visited a hospital in Singapore this week apparently for medical checks, his first trip outside his country since he was ousted from office last month, sources in Singapore said on Thursday. Mugabe left Harare with his wife and aides on Monday evening, a Zimbabwe state security official said this week. Mugabe visited a private hospital in central Singapore on Wednesday with an entourage that included his security guards, the sources who were familiar with the visit told Reuters.



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Watch This British Archbishop End His Decade-Long Protest Of Robert Mugabe

Watch This British Archbishop End His Decade-Long Protest Of Robert MugabeNearly 10 years ago, Dr. John Sentamu, the archbishop of York, dramatically cut his clerical collar into pieces on live television.



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Grace and Robert Mugabe 'to remain in Zimbabwe' under government deal

Grace and Robert Mugabe 'to remain in Zimbabwe' under government dealRobert Mugabe and his family are set to remain in Zimbabwe under a deal with the ruling party that will see them retreat from politics in exchange for secure retirement, diplomatic and political sources in Harare said.   Mr Mugabe, 93, resigned on Tuesday following a military coup and an outpouring of public anger at economic mismanagement, corruption, and political violence during his nearly four decades of rule.  During celebrations in Harare following his resignation on Tuesday night, one man told The Telegraph he would like to see the former president "in leg irons". But in a possible indication of plans to rehabilitate the ousted president, posters were put up in Harare on Wednesday with the slogan "let Mugabe rest now". "President Mugabe is now a private citizen. Let’s let him enjoy a private life," said Nick Mangwana, the head of the Zanu-PF branch in London. "For the 1st time in history, Zimbabwe has a former leader. We don’t know how to treat such," he added on Twitter.  Mr Mugabe and his family may also be allowed to retain control of their assets, including the "Blue Roof", the vast luxury Harare mansion where Mr Mugabe and Grace Mugabe, the former first lady, spent the past week under house arrest.  Profile | Grace Mugabe It is unclear whether there would be any investigation into how Mrs Mugabe amassed wealth including what is believed to be the largest land and real estate portfolio owned by anyone in Zimbabwean history. Welshman Ncube, a barrister, constitutional lawyer, and long time opposition leader said: "Mugabe is a complex character. He would have told the military, 'make me a martyr but I am going nowhere'. Given the vitriol and hatred towards Grace Mugabe, I suspect she will move in and out but spend more time out of Zimbabwe. He added: "Remember however much we want a new Zimbabwe, Mnangagwa was, from the beginning,  an enforcer for Mugabe, as were the generals. I would so like to be wrong, but this is not about a new Zimbabwe, it is still about Zanu-PF which has always been a party of coercion.” Other allies of Mrs Mugabe from the G40, the faction of Zanu-PF that supported her, may not be so lucky.  Phelekezela Mphoko, Zimbabwe's second vice president who was in Japan at the time of the coup, is believed to have flown to Zambia. Savior Kasukawere, a local government minister, and Jonathan Moyo, the tertiary education minister, are understood to have fled to South Africa.  Mr Moyo said on Twitter earlier this week that about 50 other senior Zanu-PF figures had also left the country.  Human rights groups have expressed concern about the whereabouts of Ignatius Chombo, the finance minister, who has not been seen since the night of the coup on November 14.  It emerged on Wednesday that Mr Mugabe himself turned down an offer of asylum from neighbouring Zambia at the height of the coup.  “I had talked to him that if the chips are down you can come here but he refused saying that his home was Zimbabwe and he will remain there,” Edgar Lungu, the president of Zambia, told local media. 



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Zimbabweans Celebrate In The Streets After Mugabe Resignation

Zimbabweans Celebrate In The Streets After Mugabe ResignationZimbabwe’s capital city of Harare erupted in exuberant celebration on Tuesday as Robert Mugabe, the country’s 93-year-old authoritarian president, resigned after nearly four decades in office.



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Zimbabwe's Mugabe resigns, ending four decades of rule

Zimbabwe's Mugabe resigns, ending four decades of ruleBy MacDonald Dzirutwe HARARE (Reuters) – Robert Mugabe resigned as Zimbabwe’s president on Tuesday a week after the army and his former political allies moved to end four decades of rule by a man once feted as an independence hero who became feared as a despot. The 93-year-old Mugabe had clung on for a week after an army takeover. Wild celebrations broke out at a joint sitting of parliament when Speaker Jacob Mudenda read out Mugabe’s brief resignation letter and suspended the impeachment procedure.



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Mugabe resigns, ending 37-year reign over Zimbabwe

Mugabe resigns, ending 37-year reign over ZimbabweRobert Mugabe resigned as Zimbabwe’s president on Tuesday, finally swept from power as his 37-year reign of autocratic control and brutality crumbled within days of a military takeover. The move looks set to end Zimbabwe’s worst political crisis since it won independence from Britain in 1980. The bombshell announcement came at a special joint session of parliament convened to impeach Mugabe, 93, who has dominated every aspect of Zimbabwean public life for decades.



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Robert Mugabe to face impeachment by Wednesday as ‘source of instability’

Robert Mugabe to face impeachment by Wednesday as ‘source of instability’Zimbabwe's military appealed for calm on Monday as MPs prepared to to impeach Robert Mugabe as a "source of instability" amid mounting public outrage at his refusal to step down as the country's president on Sunday.  In a public address on Monday evening, the military, which launched a soft coup against Mr Mugabe last week, said it had agreed on a "road map" out of the deadlock and that a former vice president whose sacking triggered the crisis would return to the country shortly.  "We remained seized with Operation Restore Legacy… we have made further consultation to agree on a road map on the prevailing situation” Gen Constantino Chiwenga, the head of the armed forces, said in a press conference. "We are encouraged by communication between the President and former vice president. We will advise the nation about talks between the two." Emmerson Mnangagwa, who fled the country after Mr Mugabe was fired him as vice president earlier this month, has not been seen since the coup began. The military is widely assumed to be seeking to install him as president.   Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe delivers his speech during a live broadcast at State House in Harare, Sunday, Nov, 19, 2017 Credit: AP Mr Mugabe shocked the world and sparked confusion in Zimbabwe when he used a televised address – expected to be a resignation speech – to claim that military coup did not represent a challenge to his authority and that he would preside over the party’s December congress as previously planned. The speech, which came after his own party recalled him as their leader and organised massive street protests calling for his resignation in a bid to pressure him to resign, was so unexpected it sparked speculation he had been handed the wrong speech, possibly with the collusion of the generals.  “We were disappointed yesterday in the midst of all those generals he appeared to swap [speeches]” Chris Mutsvangwa, the head of the country’s influential veterans association, said at a press conference on Monday morning, referring to footage that showed Mr Mugabe shuffling papers and one of the generals seated behind him handling a sheaf of A4 sheets before he began speaking on Sunday. Mr Mutsvanga, whose organization was once a bastion of support for Mr Mugabe but is now calling for his removal, said the president's refusal to stand down a "dereliction of duty". Addressing Mr Mugabe directly, he added: "Your time is up." Jubilation in Zimbabwe as Mugabe is sacked by his own party 01:20 A senior military source told the Telegraph that the country's generals had nothing to do with the non-resignation and were “stunned” and left “furious” when Mr Mugabe finished his  rambling 20 minute speech without stepping down.  "They still respect him, so they would not check [the text of the speech]. They believed he would resign. The couldn't do anything to stop him," said the source, a long-serving senior officer.   Mr Mugabe has been under effective house arrest since the Zimbabwean military seized control of the country on Tuesday night in a coup designed to prevent him his wife, Grace, from succeeding him as president and install Mr Mnangagwa instead. In an effort to retain a semblance of legitimacy for their actions, the generals have attempted to persuade Mr Mugabe to resign in accordance with the country’s constitution rather than to simply oust him in a classic coup d’etat. He was widely reported to have agreed to do so before Sunday night, when he claimed he would preside over the Zanu-PF party congress on December as planned.   Zanu-PF, the party Mr Mugabe founded and which he has led in office for more than 37 years, met to debate a parliamentary impeachment motion after the 93 year old president ignored another deadline to step down. The party had demanded that Mr Mugabe resign by midday local time (10:AM GMT). People cheer soldiers during a march in the streets to demand that President Robert Mugabe resign and step down from power in Harare, Zimbabwe, on November 19, 2017 Credit: Barcroft Media A draft of the impeachment and no-confidence motion, which the Telegraph has seen, lists grievances including failing to address corruption, sending the country into a 15-year "economic tailspin", allowing his wife, Grace Mugabe, to assume his constitutional responsibilities, and accusing deputies of plotting coups without evidence.  "This attests to the President's poor sense of judgement and disrespect for the law," reads the motion which was drafted by Lovemore Matuke, the Zanu-PF chief whip in parliament.  "[The motion] herefore calls upon this house to cause the removal of the President from office in light of the above," it adds. Zimbabwe’s constitution allows parliament to remove the president if two thirds of both houses find him unfit to carry out his duties. Parliament first would have to vote by a simple majority to appoint a select committee to investigate Mr Mugabe’s fitness to rule. People cheer during a during a march in the streets to demand that President Robert Mugabe resign and step down from power in Harare, Zimbabwe, on November 19, 2017 Credit: Barcroft Media Paul Mangwana, Zanu-PF’s deputy secretary for legal affairs, told reporters at the party's Harare headquarters that impeachment could be set in motion as early as Tuesday and could be completed in two days.  Other legal experts have warned it could take weeks, however.  MPs from the Movement for Democratic Change, Zimbabwe’s main opposition party, said they would meet on Tuesday to agree a position on a possible impeachment vote. Morgan Tsvangirai, the leader of the MDC, warned that infighting inside Zanu-PF and differences with the military over how to handle the crisis should not be allowed to prevent a "fresh start" for the country. "It would be inimical to progress and the future of the country if all this action was about power retention at all costs," Mr Tsvangirai wrote on his party’s website. Gen Constantino Chiwenga, head of the Zimbabwean military, looks on while Robert Mugabe reads a speech on Sunday Credit:  Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP The development came as one of Grace Mugabe's closest allies said he had manged to flee the country.  Jonathan Moyo, the tertiary education minister and a key figure in G40, the faction surrounding Mrs Mugabe, tweeted that he and at least 50 other senior party officials were "outside of the country." The tweet was later deleted Theresa May said on Monday that it was clear Mr Mugabe had lost the support of the Zimbabwean people but that the outcome of the crisis remained uncertain. "We don't yet know how developments in Zimbabwe are going to play out. What does appear clear is that Mugabe has lost the support of the people and of his party," said James Slack, Mrs May’s spokesman. Mr Slack said Britain "would appeal for everyone to refrain from violence and hope to see a peaceful and swift resolution to the situation." Kenneth Kaunda, a former president of Zambia, arrived in Harare on Monday in a bid to persuade Mr Mugabe to make a “dignified” exit.



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Zimbabwe parliament starts impeachment of Robert Mugabe 'for falling asleep in meetings' 

Zimbabwe parliament starts impeachment of Robert Mugabe 'for falling asleep in meetings' Zimbabwe's parliament opened a session to begin impeachment proceedings against President Robert Mugabe on Tuesday as ousted vice president Emmerson Mnangagwa, who could be the country's next leader, told him to step down. Zanu PF, the ruling party, tabled a no-confidence motion urging parliament to remove Mr Mugabe from office for a string of offenses including falling asleep in meetings and allowing his wife to "usurp" presidential powers.  "We have seen the president sleeping in Cabinet and international meetings to the horror, shame and consternation of Zimbabweans," reads the motion, which was seconded by the parliamentary leader of the Movement for Democratic Change, the main opposition party.  Mr Mugabe also is accused of allowing Grace Mugabe, the first lade, to threaten to kill Mr Mnangagwa.  A joint session of both houses of parliament must now appoint a committee to investigate the claims and report back on whether or not a vote of no confidence will follow.  Further street protests have been called in Harare, raising fears that the political turmoil could spill over into violence. Mr Mugabe also suffered humiliation on Tuesday when almost no government ministers heeded his call to attend a cabinet meeting at his State House residence, official media reported. The snub piled pressure on the embattled president after Mr Mnangagwa, the vice president whose removal by Mr Mugabe sparked the military intervention last week, said he would consider returning to Zimbabwe if his safety was guaranteed. Mr Mnangagwa's intervention is his first public move since the army seized control. Lawmakers of Mr Mugabe's once-loyal Zanu-PF party met in parliament at 12.15pm (GMT) to trigger proceedings that could see the president stripped of office. Lawmakers in Zimbabwe sat for a session of parliament at 12.12pm (GMT) Credit:  Ben Curtis/ AP Parliament speaker Jacob Mubenda gave permission for a joint session of the House of Assembly and the Senate to debate a motion that would trigger impeachment proceedings against Mugabe. "This motion is unprecedented in the history of post-independence Zimbabwe," Mr Mubenda declared. Dozens of protesters gathered near parliament, chanting for Mr Mugabe to resign and brandishing Zimbabwean flags and banners emblazoned with "Mugabe go". A bubbling factional squabble over the presidential succession erupted two weeks ago when Mr Mugabe fired Mr Mnangagwa. The dismissal put Mr Mugabe's wife Grace in prime position to succeed her 93-year-old husband, prompting the military to step in to block her path to the presidency. After Mr Mnangagwa fled abroad, the army took over the country and placed Mugabe under house arrest – provoking amazement and delight among many Zimbabweans as his autocratic 37-year reign appeared close to an end. Mr Mnangagwa – formerly one of Mugabe's closest allies and a regime hardliner – said in his statement that Zimbabweans had "clearly demonstrated without violence their insatiable desire" for Mugabe to resign. "It is my appeal to President Mugabe that he should take heed of this clarion call," he said. The influential war veterans' association appeared to pull back from an earlier call for immediate demonstrations at Mugabe's home, instead threatening further protest action if Mr Mugabe clung on. Zimbabwe | Impeachment process "Smell the coffee – your time is gone," War Veterans' association chairman Chris Mutsvangwa said Tuesday. "Intention and action must coincide now. If he doesn't go, we will be calling on the people of Zimbabwe to come out to show him to go." On Monday evening, army chief Constantino Chiwenga told reporters that progress had been made in talks towards an apparent exit deal for the world's oldest head of state. Mr Chiwenga called for patience and calm after elated Zimbabweans were stunned to see the president declaring in a TV address on Sunday that he was still in power. Mr Mugabe's wife Grace, 52, has not been seen since the takeover. Zanu-PF lawmakers vowed to remove Mugabe after he missed their weekend deadline to resign. Mr Mugabe is thought to be battling to delay his exit in order to secure a deal that would guarantee protection for him and his family. The army insists it has not carried out a coup, but rather an operation to arrest allegedly corrupt supporters around the Mugabe family.



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Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe Resigns

Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe ResignsRobert Mugabe, Zimbabwe’s authoritarian president, agreed to step down on Tuesday, according to the speaker of parliament.



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Zimbabwe's Mugabe ignores calls to quit, faces impeachment

Zimbabwe's Mugabe ignores calls to quit, faces impeachmentHARARE, Zimbabwe (AP) — Zimbabweans mobilized Monday for a major push to oust President Robert Mugabe, an increasingly isolated figure who faces impeachment proceedings and more street demonstrations even as he ignores calls to resign.



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