Tag Archives: move

Man Sues Ex-Girlfriend For Sabotaging Music Career So He Wouldn't Move Away

Man Sues Ex-Girlfriend For Sabotaging Music Career So He Wouldn't Move AwayPeople in love do strange things, but sabotaging their partner's career is not



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China rages over US warships sailing near disputed islands, saying move 'seriously infringed' its sovereignty

China rages over US warships sailing near disputed islands, saying move 'seriously infringed' its sovereigntyChina has reacted angrily after two US warships sailed near the disputed Paracel Islands in the South China Sea, describing the move as a “provocation” and accusing America of committing a serious infringement of the country’s sovereignty. A statement issued by the defence ministry said Chinese vessels and aircraft warned American ships to leave because they had entered its territorial waters in the South China Sea, through which nearly $ 5 trillion in ship-borne trade flows, without permission. The move “contravened Chinese and relevant international law, seriously infringed upon Chinese sovereignty [and] harmed strategic mutual trust between the two militaries”, it said.



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Judge Orders 30-Year-Old Man To Move Out Of His Parents' House Already

Judge Orders 30-Year-Old Man To Move Out Of His Parents' House AlreadyTwo parents in New York will finally get to know what empty nest syndrome



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New York Judge Orders 30-Year-Old to Move Out of His Parents House After They Sue

New York Judge Orders 30-Year-Old to Move Out of His Parents House After They SueMark and Christina Rotondo brought the case against their son Michael after eviction letters offering money and other help were ignored



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Parents sue their 30-year-old son because he won't move out

Parents sue their 30-year-old son because he won't move outOne set of parents is desperate to have an empty nest.  In Syracuse, New York, a couple is suing their 30-year-old in order to get him to move out of their house. According to News 8, the Rotondo parents say they've given their son Michael five notices over the past few months telling him to leave. They also told him that they'll help him if he does vacate. SEE ALSO: Awkward photobomb gets MUCH worse when daughter recognizes her dad as a creepy meme However, the son is saying he legally wasn't given enough notice.  You have to admire his determination. The court filings state the parent's reason for suing is that he doesn't pay for living with them and doesn't help out around the house. Under this legal reasoning, my parents probably should have sued me when I was a kid. The neighbors in the area are siding with the parents. News 8 says resident Lashea Wright stated, "It's time. He's 30. And not paying rent. You need to be independent." The Rotondo family is going to court later this month, just before the son's 31st birthday. WATCH: Here's why parents should be concerned about their kids' social media use



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With Israel embassy move US forfeits authority in the Middle East, says Turkey's Recep Tayyip Erdogan 

With Israel embassy move US forfeits authority in the Middle East, says Turkey's Recep Tayyip Erdogan  The United States has forfeited its authority to broker a solution to the Israel-Palestine conflict and has become "part of the problem, not the solution", Turkey's president has said.  Recep Tayip Erdogan's comments were among the most strongly worded of a series of diplomatic protests as government around the world condemned Donald Trump's decision to move the US embassy to Jerusalem. The United States formally opened an embassy in Jerusalem on Monday afternoon, after Mr Trump recognized Jerusalem as Israel's capital last year.   Senior White House Advisor Jared Kushner speaks at the opening of the US embassy in Jerusalem Credit: Lior Mizrahi/Getty Palestinian health officials said 52 people were killed and more 1200 injured by Israeli fire during protests against the opening of a US embassy in Jerusalem. Mr Erdogan, who is in London on a three day visit for talks with Theresa May, said the move could "ignite an even greater fire between communities." "With its latest step America has chosen to be a part of the problem, not a solution, and lost its mediator role in the Middle East peace process", he said in a speech at Chatham House  "We are rejecting once again this decision which violates international law and which is against UN resolutions," he said. Israeli security forces fire tear gas canisters over Palestinians near Khan Yunis, Gaza  Credit: Anadolu "The international community must do its part as soon as possible and take swift action to put an end to Israel's increasing aggression," he went on. In a separate statement, Mrs May called for "restraint" and criticized the move, but avoided Mr Erdogan's direct condemnation. "We are concerned by the reports of violence and loss of life in Gaza. We urge calm and restraint to avoid actions destructive to peace efforts," a Number 10 spokesman said.  "The prime minister had made her views clear in December that we disagreed with the decision (to move the US embassy). We believe it's unhelpful in terms of prospects for peace in the region." Extremely saddened by loss of life in Gaza today. Concerned peaceful protests are being exploited by extremist elements. Urge restraint in use of live fire. Violence is destructive to peace efforts. UK remains committed to a two-state solution with Jerusalem as a shared capital.— Alistair Burt (@AlistairBurtUK) May 14, 2018 Alistair Burt, the Foreign Office minister for the Middle East, tweeted: "Extremely saddened by loss of life in Gaza today. Concerned peaceful protests are being exploited by extremist elements. Urge restraint in use of live fire. Violence is destructive to peace efforts. UK remains committed to a two-state solution with Jerusalem as a shared capital." But other governments took a much stronger line.  Jean-Yves Le Drian, the French foreign minister, called the embassy move a violation of International law and of the UN Security Council resolutions.  Referring to the day's violence, he said: "France calls on all actors to show responsibility to prevent a news escalation and calls on the Israeli authorities to exercise discernment and restraint in the use of force that must be strictly proportionate," he said.   Palestinians carry an injured protestor during a demonstratoin near the Shuja'iyya neighborhood of Gaza City Credit:  Anadolu Mikhail Bogdanov, the Russian deputy foreign minister responsible for Middle Eastern affairs, called the move "short sighted" and said the US was to blame for the "sharp escalation" of violence in Gaza on Monday.  The Palestinian Authority, which controls the West Bank but not the Gaza strip, called the killings a "massacre" and demanded an emergency meeting of the UN Security council  "If a similar massacre (by an occupying power) happens in any other nation, it would trigger a massive global outrage. Palestine should not be an exception" said Riyad Mansour, the Palestinian ambassador to the UN.  Saudi Arabia and Kuwait have also urged a UN emergency meeting.  Zeid Ra'ad al Hussein, the UN high commissioner for human rights,  called the violence in Gaza "shocking" and demanded that Israel halt the use of live rounds.   “Shocking killing of dozens, injury of hundreds by Israeli live fire in #Gaza must stop now. The right to life must be respected. Those responsible for outrageous human rights violations must be held to account. The int'l community needs to ensure justice for victims,” he said in a Tweet put out by his office. EU foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini urged "utmost restraint", saying "dozens of Palestinians, including children, have been killed and hundreds injured from Israeli fire today, during ongoing mass protests near the Gaza fence. We expect all to act with utmost restraint to avoid further loss of life" Iran, which is locked in a diplomatic and military confrontation with Israel over its presence in Syria, called it "a day of great shame".  "Israeli regime massacres countless Palestinians in cold blood as they protest in world's largest open air prison. Meanwhile, Trump celebrates move of U.S. illegal embassy and his Arab collaborators move to divert attention,"  said Javad Zarif, the Iranian foreign minister.   



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Israelis march, bask in national pride ahead of US embassy move

Israelis march, bask in national pride ahead of US embassy moveIsraelis basked in national pride and prepared for a Jerusalem march expected to draw tens of thousands Sunday, a day ahead of the controversial US embassy move to the disputed city. Palestinians meanwhile readied for their own protests on Monday over the embassy’s inauguration, including another mass demonstration in the Gaza Strip near the border with Israel. Sunday’s Jerusalem march begins a week of high tension between Israelis and Palestinians, highlighted by the embassy inauguration to be attended by a Washington delegation including US President Donald Trump’s daughter Ivanka and her husband, senior White House adviser Jared Kushner.



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US embassy move to Jerusalem leaves hundreds of elderly residents facing eviction

US embassy move to Jerusalem leaves hundreds of elderly residents facing evictionWorkmen have been toiling around the clock in preparation for Monday’s grand opening ceremony of the new US embassy in Jerusalem. Rooms have been renovated, flowers planted in the design of the US flag and the seal of the US embassy has gone up. Security around the building has been upgraded, road signs installed and CCTV cameras set up in the area – all part of the renovations that President Trump says have cost a modest $ 400,000 (£295,000).



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Venezuela angered by ConocoPhillips move on Caribbean oil

Venezuela angered by ConocoPhillips move on Caribbean oilVenezuela on Thursday strongly rejected the takeover of its Caribbean oil stocks by ConocoPhillips, after the US company enforced a $ 2 billion international arbitration award last month. A ConocoPhillips source said the company was enforcing the award at four locations in the Caribbean, without specifying the facilities affected. Press reports said the affected assets are in Curacao, Bonaire and Saint Eustace.



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After North Korea detonated a nuclear bomb inside a mountain, scientists watched it move

After North Korea detonated a nuclear bomb inside a mountain, scientists watched it moveWhen North Korea detonates nuclear bombs, it brings the devices into tunnels dug deep inside Mount Mantap, a granite peak over 7,000 feet tall. Mantap has now sustained six such detonations, with the last of which — set off on September 3, 2017 — moving the mountain more than 11 feet (3.5 meters), according to researchers who used space imaging technology, called synthetic aperture radar, or SAR, to map how much Mantap's surface shifted and then settled back down during the blast. They published their results in the journal
Science on Thursday. Although this technique isn't yet used to rapidly detect attempts at secretive nuclear testing today, it could help do so in the future.  SEE ALSO: Extreme Arctic heat wave in 2016 wouldn't have happened without climate change "World peace benefits from the adherence to internationally-negotiated nuclear-test-ban treaties that strive to promote the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons," Teng Wang, lead author of the study and a tectonics senior research fellow at Earth Observatory of Singapore, said in an email.  "Surveillance of clandestine nuclear tests relies on a global seismic network, but the potential of spaceborne monitoring has been underexploited," Wang added. "This study demonstrates the capability of spaceborne remote sensing to help characterize large underground nuclear tests, if any, in the future." Wang and his team used data captured by the German imaging satellite TerraSAR-X to view the mountain before and after the explosion. The images aren't actual digital pictures of the mountain; instead, the satellite acts as a radar, bouncing pulses off the land below, which travels back up to the satellite in space, giving scientists detailed measurements — and how they changed after a powerful blast.  The TerraSAR-X satellite.Image: dlr/esaThe same satellite technology can be used to measure how the land deforms after earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, moving glaciers and other natural events, said Wang. A great advantage to this space imaging technique is that, unlike digital imaging, SAR can penetrate clouds and weather, to see what's transpired below. The fact that Wang could measure a massive chunk of Earth-bound rock moving horizontally over 11 feet is understandable, when considering how big the September 2017 blast was. Detonated around 1,500 feet below ground, according to researchers, it triggered a 6.3 magnitude earthquake, a strong class of temblor that causes violent shaking near the epicenter.  "This one was big enough that we saw it all over," Dale Anderson, a seismologist and specialist in nuclear nonproliferation monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory, said in an interview. "It was picked up on the other side of the world."
(Above: A simulation of rock damage from a nuclear blast. Credit: Los Alamos National Laboratory)  Although the international community can't see what North Korea is doing under Mantap, modern detection technology — while not capable of observing the mountain move — can easily spot a large nuclear blast, and pinpoint its location.  "It’s very, very, very hard to hide one of these," Anderson said.  As part of the international ban on testing nukes (which North Korea does not adhere to), an organization called the International Monitoring System (IMS) is measuring seismic waves "24-7," said Anderson. This includes picking up movement in the rock at seismic stations around the world, as well as acoustic pulses the blast sends up into the air.  Combining the two detection techniques can give scientists an accurate idea of where the shaking event came from, especially if the blast is big enough. "Every Korean test we’ve ever heard has been big enough," said Anderson.  And confirming that the blast is definitely nuclear, and not say, an earthquake, is also possible. Nuclear blasts release a gas called xenon, which can be picked up by detectors all over the world. Even under a mountain, the gases can seep out, said Anderson. 
(Above: A simulation of gas moving to the surface. Credit: Los Alamos National Laboratory) Future nuclear blasts underneath Mantap will almost certainly be picked by the IMS, and Wang said space imaging technology can then be used to learn more detail about the event — like how deep it is, and how it affected the mountain. After enduring six nuclear blasts, one wonders how much more a mountain can take.  President Donald Trump is meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un on June 12, in discussions that might persuade the military commander to denuclearize the secretive, communist nation. Still, Mantap may continue to be used as a test site — if North Korea decides to continue its nuclear testing program. It takes a lot to topple a mountain. After analyzing seismic shockwaves from the blast, the team suggests that some portions inside the mountain may have collapsed, but there's no way to actually confirm this without entering the mountain.  "You're talking about a chunk of solid, confident rock that is 800 meters thick," said Anderson.  "You can’t just break that up with one shock." "You’ll eventually find a flaw and it’ll crack," he added. "And if you smack it with a sledgehammer — a nuclear explosion — it might break a little quicker." WATCH: It takes absolute precision to construct Earth's largest telescope, which will peak into far-off alien worlds



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