Tag Archives: Mountain

Fulfilling a dream, South Korea's Moon visits sacred North Korean mountain with Kim

Fulfilling a dream, South Korea's Moon visits sacred North Korean mountain with KimAfter the two leaders pledged new steps aimed at salvaging nuclear talks on Wednesday, Moon and Kim decided to use the final day of their three-day summit to go up the symbolic mountain on the Chinese border together. Moon is known for his love of mountain climbing and has trekked in the Himalayas at least twice. The president has long stated that visiting Mount Paektu, which can also be spelled Baekdu in the South and is known as Changbai in China, was a “long unfulfilled dream”.



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Flash flood kills 10 hikers in Italian mountain gorge as rescuers say it hit like 'a tsunami'

Flash flood kills 10 hikers in Italian mountain gorge as rescuers say it hit like 'a tsunami'An eight-year-old girl survived a devastating flash flood in a canyon in southern Italy but was found next to a body that rescuers believe may be one of her parents. The girl, named as Chiara, was semi-conscious, covered in thick mud and suffering from hypothermia when she was found in the gorge in Calabria after it was hit by a “tsunami” of muddy water following a severe storm. The seven-mile-long canyon, located in Pollino national park, has 2,300ft-high sheer rock walls which in some places are just 13ft apart. At least two groups of hikers were caught up in the disaster on Monday. While some were able to scramble to higher ground, others were engulfed by the flash flood and drowned. Ten people were killed, with some bodies washed up to three miles downstream by the force of the torrent. Eleven people were injured, five of them seriously. Four children lost either one or both of their parents. A rescue helicopter in the gorge that was hit by a flash flood Credit: Francesco Arena/Ansa “She was semi-conscious but clearly in a state of shock. We found her next to a corpse and from what we know, her parents are almost certainly among the victims,” said Pasquale Gagliardi, a doctor with the local helicopter rescue service. The little girl, who had swallowed mud and debris, was flown by helicopter to a hospital in Naples, hundreds of miles to the north. A girl is helped by a member of the National Alpine and Caving Rescue Squad as they (right) descend the gorge Credit: ANSA/AP “You’re going to make it, little one,” Dr Pasquale wrote on Facebook under a photograph of the girl’s hand, covered in mud, on the shoulder of an alpine rescue specialist. The hand of the eight year old girl on the shoulder of an alpine rescue specialist Credit: Twitter The victims included a volunteer rescue worker who helped pull people alive from a hotel in central Italy that was hit by a deadly avalanche in January 2017. Antonio De Rasis, 32, was guiding hikers through the gorge when it was hit by the 8ft-high wall of water. “With his experience, he would definitely have tried to help the group as much as possible,” said Antonio Carlomagno, the mayor of the town where Mr De Rasis came from. The flash flood also claimed the lives of two models, Miriam Mezzolla, 27, and Claudia Giampietro, 31, who were said to be inseparable and shared a passion for burlesque dancing. Rescuers work in the gorge of the Raganello stream in Civita Credit: WENN.com  An investigation has been launched into the disaster, with questions asked about why people were allowed into the gorge when bad weather was forecast. “It was a real tsunami. These are events that happen once in a lifetime,” said Giacomo Zanfei, a senior official with the mountain rescue service. Italy has experienced strange weather this summer, with torrid heat building up in the mornings and then giving way to thunder, lightning and torrential rain. Rescuers and citizens wait in the central square of Civita, a village in the Italian Calabria southern region  Credit: AFP Climate experts say the summer is becoming less dry and more “tropical”, with higher rainfall than before. “It is a shocking tragedy, linked to the terrible weather we’ve had this summer,” said Mimmo Lo Polito, a local mayor. The canyoning disaster comes just a week after the collapse of the Morandi bridge in Genoa, which killed 43 people. Raganello gorges in Pollino National Park, Calabria Credit: DEA/V. GIANNELLA  "Italy is tired of crying for the dead. Enough," said Sergio Costa, the environment minister, during a visit to the scene. "If what happened is the result of negligence, sloppiness or a lack of awareness of the risks, we are facing a serious situation that we need to get to the bottom of." “The whole country is deeply saddened by this new tragedy, which has caused many deaths and injuries in Pollino national park,” said Sergio Mattarella, Italy’s president.



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Cougar kills U.S. mountain biker, mauls another, later shot

Cougar kills U.S. mountain biker, mauls another, later shotThe mountain bikers were riding together down a remote, backwoods trail at 11 a.m. (2 p.m. ET) in an area near North Bend, Washington state, around 30 miles (48 km) east of Seattle, when the two men encountered the animal. Cougars are the fourth largest cat species worldwide, with adult females weighing up to 141 pounds (64 kgs) and males weighing as much as 220 pounds (100 kgs).



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Cougar kills U.S. mountain biker, mauls another, later shot

Cougar kills U.S. mountain biker, mauls another, later shotThe mountain bikers were riding together down a remote, backwoods trail at 11 a.m. (2 p.m. ET) in an area near North Bend, Washington state, around 30 miles (48 km) east of Seattle, when the two men encountered the animal. Cougars are the fourth largest cat species worldwide, with adult females weighing up to 141 pounds (64 kgs) and males weighing as much as 220 pounds (100 kgs).



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Cougar kills mountain biker and wounds another in Washington state

Cougar kills mountain biker and wounds another in Washington stateTwo friends on a morning mountain bike ride 30 miles (48 kilometres) east of Seattle were attacked by a cougar, killing one of the men and leaving the second hospitalised. The cougar was later found up a tree near the dead man's body, where agents for the state's Fish and Wildlife police shot and killed it hours after the Saturday attack, the Seattle Times reported. The names of neither man were immediately released. The 31-year-old survivor said he and his friend were mountain biking in the Lake Hancock forest area at about 11am when they realised they were being chased by the big cat. "So they stopped and they made a lot of noise, said Capt. Alan Myers of the state department of Fish and Wildlife, ''which is exactly what we counsel people to do. "The two victims then took a minute and were catching their breath about this amazing, incredibly scary event that just occurred and suddenly the victim (the survivor) was attacked again by this cougar.  "It latched onto his head. He said he had his whole entire head in the jaws of this animal and was being shaken around very, very horribly."  Here’s a photo of the cougar that attacked two men on a mountain bike ride near North Bend today. One man died. Another man is at Harborview Medical Center tonight @komonews#komonews#Cougarattackpic.twitter.com/gVQSLL3CwB— Tammy Mutasa (@TammyKOMO) May 20, 2018 The second victim turned and started to run away, and the cougar went after him and killed the 32-year-old. The injured man rode for about 2 miles (3.2 kilometres) before getting mobile coverage and calling emergency services. Patient status update: The 31-year-old male who arrived at Harborview this afternoon as a result of a mountain lion attack near North Bend is being treated in the Emergency Dept. He is currently awake and alert and in serious condition.— Harborview Seattle (@harborviewmc) May 19, 2018  Sgt. Ryan Abbott said when rescuers arrived it took them about 30 minutes to locate the second victim, who was dead with the cougar standing on top of him. "The deputies shot at him and spooked him, and he ran off," he said. It took several hours before authorities found the cougar up a tree 45 to 182 metres away and killed it. While the cougar was being hunted, rescuers had to wait to retrieve the dead man's body. Rich Beausoleil, the state's bear and cougar specialist, said it was only the second fatality in the state in the last 94 years. "But it's one too many," he said. Cougars, also known as mountain lions and pumas, are a protected species, the Times reported. Each year, the state allows 250 cougars to be hunted and killed in 50 designated zones. 



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Cougar Attacks Mountain Bikers Near Seattle, Killing One and Injuring Another

Cougar Attacks Mountain Bikers Near Seattle, Killing One and Injuring AnotherThe cougar bit one of the cyclists on the head before pouncing on the second, killing him and dragging him away



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Cyclist mauled to death by mountain lion on forest trail near Seattle

Cyclist mauled to death by mountain lion on forest trail near SeattleA mountain biker has died and a second person was seriously injured after they were attacked by a cougar on a remote trail in Washington state. “He jumped the first victim and attacked him,” said Sergeant Ryan Abbott, of the King County Sheriff’s Office. Sgt Abbott said when rescuers arrived it took around 30 minutes to locate the second victim, who was dead with the cougar standing on top of him.



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Cougar Kills Mountain Biker In Washington, Injures Companion

Cougar Kills Mountain Biker In Washington, Injures CompanionA cougar attacked two mountain bikers in Washington Saturday morning, killing



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After North Korea detonated a nuclear bomb inside a mountain, scientists watched it move

After North Korea detonated a nuclear bomb inside a mountain, scientists watched it moveWhen North Korea detonates nuclear bombs, it brings the devices into tunnels dug deep inside Mount Mantap, a granite peak over 7,000 feet tall. Mantap has now sustained six such detonations, with the last of which — set off on September 3, 2017 — moving the mountain more than 11 feet (3.5 meters), according to researchers who used space imaging technology, called synthetic aperture radar, or SAR, to map how much Mantap's surface shifted and then settled back down during the blast. They published their results in the journal
Science on Thursday. Although this technique isn't yet used to rapidly detect attempts at secretive nuclear testing today, it could help do so in the future.  SEE ALSO: Extreme Arctic heat wave in 2016 wouldn't have happened without climate change "World peace benefits from the adherence to internationally-negotiated nuclear-test-ban treaties that strive to promote the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons," Teng Wang, lead author of the study and a tectonics senior research fellow at Earth Observatory of Singapore, said in an email.  "Surveillance of clandestine nuclear tests relies on a global seismic network, but the potential of spaceborne monitoring has been underexploited," Wang added. "This study demonstrates the capability of spaceborne remote sensing to help characterize large underground nuclear tests, if any, in the future." Wang and his team used data captured by the German imaging satellite TerraSAR-X to view the mountain before and after the explosion. The images aren't actual digital pictures of the mountain; instead, the satellite acts as a radar, bouncing pulses off the land below, which travels back up to the satellite in space, giving scientists detailed measurements — and how they changed after a powerful blast.  The TerraSAR-X satellite.Image: dlr/esaThe same satellite technology can be used to measure how the land deforms after earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, moving glaciers and other natural events, said Wang. A great advantage to this space imaging technique is that, unlike digital imaging, SAR can penetrate clouds and weather, to see what's transpired below. The fact that Wang could measure a massive chunk of Earth-bound rock moving horizontally over 11 feet is understandable, when considering how big the September 2017 blast was. Detonated around 1,500 feet below ground, according to researchers, it triggered a 6.3 magnitude earthquake, a strong class of temblor that causes violent shaking near the epicenter.  "This one was big enough that we saw it all over," Dale Anderson, a seismologist and specialist in nuclear nonproliferation monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory, said in an interview. "It was picked up on the other side of the world."
(Above: A simulation of rock damage from a nuclear blast. Credit: Los Alamos National Laboratory)  Although the international community can't see what North Korea is doing under Mantap, modern detection technology — while not capable of observing the mountain move — can easily spot a large nuclear blast, and pinpoint its location.  "It’s very, very, very hard to hide one of these," Anderson said.  As part of the international ban on testing nukes (which North Korea does not adhere to), an organization called the International Monitoring System (IMS) is measuring seismic waves "24-7," said Anderson. This includes picking up movement in the rock at seismic stations around the world, as well as acoustic pulses the blast sends up into the air.  Combining the two detection techniques can give scientists an accurate idea of where the shaking event came from, especially if the blast is big enough. "Every Korean test we’ve ever heard has been big enough," said Anderson.  And confirming that the blast is definitely nuclear, and not say, an earthquake, is also possible. Nuclear blasts release a gas called xenon, which can be picked up by detectors all over the world. Even under a mountain, the gases can seep out, said Anderson. 
(Above: A simulation of gas moving to the surface. Credit: Los Alamos National Laboratory) Future nuclear blasts underneath Mantap will almost certainly be picked by the IMS, and Wang said space imaging technology can then be used to learn more detail about the event — like how deep it is, and how it affected the mountain. After enduring six nuclear blasts, one wonders how much more a mountain can take.  President Donald Trump is meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un on June 12, in discussions that might persuade the military commander to denuclearize the secretive, communist nation. Still, Mantap may continue to be used as a test site — if North Korea decides to continue its nuclear testing program. It takes a lot to topple a mountain. After analyzing seismic shockwaves from the blast, the team suggests that some portions inside the mountain may have collapsed, but there's no way to actually confirm this without entering the mountain.  "You're talking about a chunk of solid, confident rock that is 800 meters thick," said Anderson.  "You can’t just break that up with one shock." "You’ll eventually find a flaw and it’ll crack," he added. "And if you smack it with a sledgehammer — a nuclear explosion — it might break a little quicker." WATCH: It takes absolute precision to construct Earth's largest telescope, which will peak into far-off alien worlds



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Twitter Erupts Over Donald Trump's 'Immigrants Are Pro Mountain Climbers' Warning

Twitter Erupts Over Donald Trump's 'Immigrants Are Pro Mountain Climbers' WarningPeople ridiculed President Donald Trump on Tuesday after he warned that



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