Tag Archives: MH370

Anger as MH370 families say official report offers no new information

Anger as MH370 families say official report offers no new informationA long-awaited official report into the disappearance of Flight MH370 gave no new clues about why the plane vanished, relatives of those on board the aircraft said Monday, expressing anger and disappointment. Family members had been hoping that the official investigation team’s report could provide them with some closure, over four years after the Malaysia Airlines flight carrying 239 people went missing. Some angry relatives walked out of the briefing.



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MH370 investigators say they can't rule out 'unlawful interference' as final report leaves relatives disappointed

MH370 investigators say they can't rule out 'unlawful interference' as final report leaves relatives disappointedInvestigators released a report on missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 on Monday, saying the Boeing 777's controls were likely deliberately manipulated to take it off course but they were not able to determine who was responsible. The 495-page report draws no conclusion about what happened aboard the plane that vanished with 239 people on board en route to Beijing from Kuala Lumpur on March 8, 2014, leaving one of the world's greatest aviation mysteries unsolved. "The answer can only be conclusive if the wreckage is found," Kok Soo Chon, head of the MH370 safety investigation team, told reporters. On May 29, Malaysia called off a three-month search by US firm Ocean Infinity, which spanned 112,000 sq km (43,243 sq miles) in the southern Indian Ocean and ended with no significant findings. It was the second major search after Australia, China and Malaysia ended a fruitless A$ 200 million (£112.06 million) search across an area of 120,000 sq km (46,332 sq miles) last year. Sarah Nor, the mother of Norliakmar Hamid, a passenger on missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, cries as she arrives for the final investigation report Credit:  MOHD RASFAN/ AFP Malaysian and international investigators have been looking into why the jet veered thousands of miles off course from its scheduled route before eventually plunging into the Indian Ocean. The last communication from the plane was from the Captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah who signed off with “Good night, Malaysian three seven zero”, as the plane left the Malaysian airspace and later turned off course. A 440-page final report by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) last year showed that Zaharie had flown a route on his home flight simulator six weeks earlier that was "initially similar" to the one actually taken by MH370. The Malaysian police previously concluded there were no unusual activity on the home simulator. Kok said the investigators examined the history of the pilot and the first officer, and they were satisfied with their background and training and mental health. "We are not of the opinion it could have been an event committed by the pilots," he said, but added they were not ruling out any possibility since the in-air turn back was done manually and the systems in the plane were also manually turned off. "We cannot exclude that there was an unlawful interference by a third party," Kok said. He added all the passengers of the 15 countries had their backgrounds checked by their respective countries and all came back with a clean bill of health. Conspiracy theories The inability to locate MH370's crash site has fuelled conspiracy theories and online debates over the last four years. Theories range from mechanical error or a remote-controlled crash, to more bizarre explanations like alien abduction and a Russian plot. Kok said they looked into each theory and rumour raised on social media. "We had over 60 allegations…we removed them one-by-one and saw what remained behind," Kok said. Rayan Gharazeddine scans the water in the southern Indian Ocean off Australia from a Royal Australian Air Force AP-3C Orion during a search for the missing plane in 2014 Credit: Rob Griffith/AP The report said there was no sign the plane was evading radar detection or that it was taken over by remote control. No irregularities were found in the on-board cargo, which included items like lithium batteries and about 2,500 kgs of mangosteen. Mistakes made In all, 27 pieces of aircraft debris have been collected from various places around the world but only three wing fragments that washed up along the Indian Ocean coast have been confirmed to be from MH370. Malaysia's newly elected Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad has said Malaysia would consider resuming the search only if new clues come to light. Investigators highlighted some mistakes made by the Kuala Lumpur and Ho Chi Minh City air traffic control centres and made safety recommendations to ensure such incidents do not occur again. Transport Minister Antony Loke said in a statement that the Malaysia would investigate any misconduct committed based on the findings. Families of passengers on board the flight said on Monday that the report failed to give closure Credit:  Joshua Paul/AP The next-of-kin of the passengers were briefed on the final report by investigators earlier on Monday. "We hope that these mistakes will not be repeated and that measures are put in place to prevent them in the future," said Grace Nathan, a lawyer whose mother, Anne Daisy, was on the plane. Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said Beijing had paid close attention to the MH370 investigation. "We hope that all sides can continue to remain in close contact and coordination, to properly carry out relevant follow-up work," he told a daily news briefing, without elaborating. The majority of passengers on board were Chinese.



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Australia investigators defend MH370 out-of-control scenario

Australia investigators defend MH370 out-of-control scenarioAustralian investigators Tuesday defended their findings that missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 was out of control when it plunged into the ocean, despite renewed theories that a rogue pilot ditched the plane. The Boeing 777 — which vanished in March 2014 en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing carrying 239 passengers — has not been found despite an extensive search led by Australia in the southern Indian Ocean and a continuing private search commissioned by Malaysia. The failure to find the plane has fuelled theories which differ from the conclusions of the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB), which led the first search, that the jet was making a high-speed out-of-control descent when it hit the water.



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MH370 search director disagrees with pilot ditch theory

MH370 search director disagrees with pilot ditch theoryCANBERRA, Australia (AP) — The director of a seabed hunt for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 on Tuesday disagreed with a new book's conclusion that the pilot likely flew the plane beyond the search area to deliberately sink it in unexplored depths of the Indian Ocean.



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MH370 captain 'deliberately evaded radar' during final moments of doomed flight

MH370 captain 'deliberately evaded radar' during final moments of doomed flightAviation experts believe they may have solved the mystery of the disappearance of flight MH370, saying the 239 passengers and crew were the victims of a deliberate, criminal act carried out by the plane’s captain. The fate of the Boeing 777 has mystified investigators ever since it went missing en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing in 2014. However, a panel of experts assembled for the Australian TV programme 60 Minutes says the evidence suggests Captain Zaharie Amad Shah executed a careful series of manoeuvres to evade detection and ensure the plane disappeared in a remote location. Martin Dolan, former head of the Australia Transport Safety Bureau, who led the two-year search for the missing plane, said: “This was planned, this was deliberate, and it was done over an extended period of time.” The plane was presumed to have flown on autopilot before running out of fuel and plunging into the southern Indian Ocean. However, the wreckage has never been found and the search was suspended in January last year. The search for MH370 The panel suggested a more gradual descent could mean the search was concentrated in the wrong area and that the plane could still be found largely intact. Simon Hardy, a Boeing 777 instructor, said Captain Zaharie avoided detection by flying a careful course along the winding border between Malaysian and Thai air space, crossing in and out of radar cover on either side. “So both of the controllers aren’t bothered about this mysterious aircraft. Cause it’s, ‘Oh, it's gone. It’s not in our space any more,’” he told the programme, which was broadcast on Sunday. Survey ship HMS Echo and a Lockheed P-3 Orion during the early days of the search in the southern Indian Ocean Credit: Press Association “If you were commissioning me to do this operation and try and make a 777 disappear, I would do exactly the same thing.” He also pointed out the Malaysian captain had made an unexplained turn to fly over his home town of Penang. “Somebody was looking out the window, It might be a long, emotional goodbye or a short, emotional goodbye to his home town,” he said. A modern mystery | Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 Larry Vance, a veteran air crash investigator, told the programme the public could be confident in a growing consensus about the plane’s final moments and that the pilot was intent on killing himself. “Unfortunately, he was killing everybody else on board, and he did it deliberately,” he added.



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Malaysia says MH370 report to be released after latest search ends

Malaysia says MH370 report to be released after latest search endsThe full investigation report into the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 will be released after the latest search efforts are completed, officials said on Thursday, four years after the aircraft first went missing. Flight MH370, carrying 239 people onboard, became one of the world’s greatest aviation mysteries when it disappeared on its way from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing on March 8, 2014. Malaysia agreed in January to pay U.S. firm Ocean Infinity up to $ 70 million if it found the plane during an offshore search effort that is underway and expected to end in June.



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US company resumes search for missing flight MH370

US company resumes search for missing flight MH370Malaysia's government said Saturday that it had approved a new attempt by a private company to find the wreckage of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, nearly four years after its disappearance sparked one of aviation's biggest mysteries.  The Texas-based company Ocean Infinity dispatched a search vessel this past week to look in the southern Indian Ocean for debris from the plane, which disappeared March 8, 2014, on a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing with 227 passengers and 12 crew members.  The governments of Malaysia, China and Australia called off the nearly three-year official search last January. The Australian Transport Safety Bureau's final report on the search conceded that authorities were no closer to knowing the reasons for the Boeing 777's disappearance, or its exact location.  "The basis of the offer from Ocean Infinity is based on 'no cure, no fee,"' said Liow Tiong Lai, Malaysian Transport Minister, on Saturday, meaning that payment will be made only if the company finds the wreckage.  "That means they are willing to search the area of 25,000 square kilometers (9,653 square miles) pointed out by the expert group near the Australian waters," he said.  Investigators recovered debris from a Boeing 777 wing on Reunion Island Credit: AP However, he said, "I don't want to give too much hope … to the (next of kin)." He said his government was committed to continuing with the search.  He did not offer other details.  Ocean Infinity said in a statement that the search vessel Seabed Constructor, which left the South African port of Durban on Tuesday, was taking advantage of favourable weather to move toward "the vicinity of the possible search zone". MH370 | The theories In the initial search for the plane, a 52-day surface search covered an area of several million square miles in the Indian Ocean west of Australia, before an underwater search mapped 274,000 square miles of seabed at depths of up to 20,000 feet. They were the largest aviation searches of their kind in history, according to the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB).  Despite other methods such as studying satellite imagery and investigating ocean drifts after debris from the plane washed ashore on islands in the eastern Indian Ocean and the east coast of Africa, the 1,046-day search was called off on January 17, 2017.  However, the ATSB's report said the understanding of where the plane may be is "better now than it has ever been," partly as a result of studying debris that washed ashore in 2015 and 2016 that showed the plane was "not configured for a ditching at the end-of-flight", meaning it had run out of fuel.  All you need to know | MH370 The search team also looked back at satellite imagery that showed objects in the ocean that may have been MH370 debris. The report said this analysis complemented work detailed in a 2016 review and identified an area of less than 10,000 square miles — roughly the size of the US state of Vermont — that "has the highest likelihood of containing MH370". The search was extremely difficult because no transmissions were received from the aircraft after its first 38 minutes of flight. Systems designed to automatically transmit the flight's position failed to work after this point, the report said. 



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Australian Authorities Regret the 'Unacceptable' End to MH370 Search

Australian Authorities Regret the 'Unacceptable' End to MH370 SearchThe 1,046-day search for the missing Malaysian flight yielded little solid data



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Report on MH370 finds 'initially similar' route on pilot's flight simulator

Report on MH370 finds 'initially similar' route on pilot's flight simulatorBy Tom Westbrook and Jamie Freed SYDNEY/SINGAPORE (Reuters) – The captain of the Malaysian Airlines aircraft that vanished somewhere in the southern Indian Ocean with 239 people on board had flown a route on his home flight simulator six weeks earlier that was “initially similar” to the one actually taken, Australian authorities said on Tuesday. The details were contained in a 440-page final report by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) on the unsuccessful search for flight MH370. “It is almost inconceivable and certainly societally unacceptable in the modern aviation era…for a large commercial aircraft to be missing and for the world not to know with certainty what became of the aircraft and those on board,” the ATSB said.



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Australia has 'better understanding' of where MH370 might be

Australia has 'better understanding' of where MH370 might beAustralian search chiefs said Tuesday they now have a better understanding of where flight MH370 might be, admitting it was inconceivable that a commercial plane could vanish in the modern era. The Malaysia Airlines jet with 239 people on board disappeared in March 2014 en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, sparking a massive underwater search in the remote southern Indian Ocean which ended in January. No trace of the aircraft was found in a 120,000 square kilometre (46,000 square mile) zone based on satellite analysis of the jet’s likely trajectory after it diverted from its flight path.



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