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Drug bosses joked about US opioid crisis that led to lives being needlessly lost, leaked emails show

Drug bosses joked about US opioid crisis that led to lives being needlessly lost, leaked emails showAs the opioid epidemic was raging in America, in May 2008 a representative of the nation’s largest manufacturer of opioid pain pills sent an email to a client at a wholesale drug distributor in Ohio.Victor Borelli, a national account manager for Mallinckrodt, told Steve Cochrane, the vice-president of sales for KeySource Medical, to check his inventories and “[i]f you are low, order more. If you are okay, order a little more, Capesce?”Then Borelli joked, “destroy this email. . .Is that really possible? Oh Well. . .”Previously, Borelli used the phrase “ship, ship, ship” to describe his job. Those email excerpts are quoted in a 144-page plaintiffs’ filing along with thousands of pages of documents unsealed by a judge’s order Friday in a landmark case in Cleveland against many of the largest companies in the drug industry.[gallery-0] A Drug Enforcement Administration database released earlier in the week revealed that the companies had inundated the nation with 76 billion oxycodone and hydrocodone pills from 2006 to 2012.Nearly 2,000 cities, counties and towns are alleging that the companies knowingly flooded their communities with opioids, fuelling an epidemic that has killed more than 200,000 since 1996.The filing by plaintiffs depict some drug company employees as driven by profits and undeterred by the knowledge that their products were wreaking havoc across the country. The defendants’ response to the motion is due on 31 July.In January 2009, Borelli told Cochrane in another email that 1,200 bottles of oxycodone 30mg tablets had been shipped.“Keep ‘em comin’!” Cochrane responded. “Flyin’ out of there. It’s like people are addicted to these things or something. Oh, wait, people are. . .”Borelli responded: “Just like Doritos keep eating. We’ll make more.”Borelli and Cochrane did not return calls for comment on Friday night.In a statement Friday night, a spokesman for Mallinckrodt sought to distance the company from Borelli’s email: “This is an outrageously callous email from an individual who has not been employed by the company for many years. It is antithetical to everything that Mallinckrodt stands for and has done to combat opioid abuse and misuse.”The Controlled Substances Act requires drug companies to control against diversion, and to design and operate systems to identify “suspicious orders,” defined as “orders of unusual size, orders deviating substantially from a normal pattern, and orders of unusual frequency.”The companies are supposed to report such orders to America’s Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and refrain from shipping them unless they can determine the drugs are unlikely to be diverted to the black market. The plaintiffs, in the filing, allege that the companies ignored red flags and failed at every level.At Cardinal Health, one of the nation’s largest drug distributors, then-CEO Kerry Clark in January 2008 wrote in an email to Cardinal senior officials that the company’s “results-oriented culture” was perhaps “leading to ill-advised or shortsighted decisions,” the filing contends.In the previous 18 months, Cardinal had been hit with nearly $ 1 billion in “fines, settlements, and lost business as a result of multiple regulatory actions,” the filing alleges, including the suspension of licenses at some of its distribution centres for failing to maintain effective controls against opioid diversion.Cardinal Health did not immediately return a request for comment on Friday night.On Aug. 31, 2011, McKesson Corp.’s then-director of regulatory affairs, David B. Gustin, told his colleagues he was concerned about the “number of accounts we have that have large gaps between the amount of Oxy or Hydro they are allowed to buy (their threshold) and the amount they really need,” according to the filing, which cites Gustin’s statements.“This increases the ‘opportunity’ for diversion by exposing more product for introduction into the pipeline than may be being used for legitimate purposes.”According to the filing, he had earlier noted to his colleagues that they “need to get out visiting more customers and away from our laptops or the company is going to end up paying the price… big time.”Another McKesson regulatory affairs director responded: “I am overwhelmed. I feel that I am going down a river without a paddle and fighting the rapids. Sooner or later, hopefully later I feel we will be burned by a customer that did not get enough due diligence,” according to the filing.McKesson is the largest drug distributor in the United States. It distributed 14.1 billion oxycodone and hydrocodone pills from 2006 to 2012, about 18% of the market, according to the DEA database.McKesson said that the DEA was responsible for setting the annual production quota of pills.“For decades, McKesson has consistently reported opioid transactions to the DEA,” McKesson spokeswoman Kristin Chasen said in a statement. “We have also invested heavily in further strengthening our anti-diversion program.”Until Friday, the documents had been sealed under a protective order issued by U.S. District Judge Dan Polster. The order was lifted a year after The Washington Post and HD Media, which publishes the Charleston Gazette-Mail in West Virginia, filed a lawsuit for access to the documents and a DEA database tracking opioid sales, known as the Automation of Reports and Consolidated Orders System, or ARCOS.The drug companies and the DEA strenuously opposed the release of the data and the documents, and Polster agreed with them. But a three-judge panel of the US Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit in Ohio ordered that some of the information should be released with reasonable redactions and the database should be made public.By consolidating cases from around the nation, the Cleveland case, for the first time, provides specific information about how and in what quantity the drugs flowed around the country, from manufacturers and distributors to pharmacies. The case also brings to light internal documents and deliberations by the companies as they sought to promote their products and contend with enforcement efforts by the DEA.The local and state government plaintiffs in the case argue that the actions of some of America’s biggest and best-known companies – including Mallinckrodt, Cardinal Health, McKesson, Walgreens, CVS, Walmart and Purdue Pharma – amounted to a civil racketeering enterprise that had a devastating effect on the plaintiffs’ communities.The case is a civil action under the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organisations (RICO) Act, making use of a law originally developed to attack organised crime.In statements on Tuesday in response to the release of the DEA database, the drug companies issued broad defences of their actions during the opioid epidemic. They have said previously that they were trying to sell legal painkillers to legitimate pain patients who had prescriptions.They have blamed the epidemic on overprescribing by physicians and also on corrupt doctors and pharmacists who worked in “pill mills” that handed out drugs with few questions asked. The companies also said they should not be held responsible for the actions of people who abused the drugs.The companies said that they were diligent about reporting their sales to the DEA and that the agency should have worked with them to do more to fight the epidemic, a point former DEA agents dispute. The companies also note that the DEA set the quotas for opioid production.“We report those suspicious orders to state boards of pharmacy and to the DEA but we do not know what those government entities do with those reports, if anything,” Cardinal Health said in a statement.The companies issued statements rejecting the plaintiffs’ allegations.McKesson said in its statement: “The allegations made by the plaintiffs are just that – allegations. They are unproven, untrue and greatly oversimplify the evolution of this health crisis as well as the roles and responsibilities of the many players in the pharmaceutical supply chain.”Mallinckrodt said the company “has for years been at the forefront of preventing prescription drug diversion and abuse, and has invested millions of dollars in a multipronged program to address opioid abuse.”One of the biggest points of contention in the lawsuit is whether the nation’s largest drug companies did enough to identify suspicious orders of opioids. What exactly constitutes a suspicious order is at the heart of the case.The DEA has long said there should be no confusion because the agency has given frequent guidance and briefings to the industry, and repeatedly defined what constitutes a suspicious order.The plaintiffs argue that the companies failed to “design serious suspicious order monitoring systems that would identify suspicious orders to the DEA” and shipped the drugs anyway.“Their failure to identify suspicious orders was their business model: they turned a blind eye and called themselves mere ‘deliverymen’ with no responsibility for what they delivered or to whom,” according to the plaintiffs’ filing.Between 1996 and 2018, the plaintiffs alleged in the filing, drug companies shipped hundreds of millions of opioid pills into Summit and Cuyahoga counties in Ohio, filling orders that were suspicious and “should never have been shipped”.“They made no effort actually to identify suspicious orders, failed to flag orders that, under any reasonable algorithm, represented between one-quarter and 90% of their business, and kept the flow of drugs coming into Summit and Cuyahoga Counties,” the plaintiffs’ lawyers wrote.In 2007, the DEA told Mallinckrodt that the numeric formula it used to monitor suspicious orders was insufficient, the filing contended. It alleges the company’s suspicious order monitoring program from 2008 through 2009 consisted of solely verifying that the customer had a valid DEA registration and that the order was accurately logged into the DEA’s tracking database.From 2003 to 2011, Mallinckrodt shipped a total of 53 million orders, flagged 37,817 as suspicious but stopped only 33 orders, the plaintiffs’ filing states.A Mallinckrodt employee said in a deposition that the DEA had described the company as the “kingpin within the drug cartel” in a meeting with the agency in July 2010, according to a footnote in the filing.In 2011, the filing cites a Justice Department document in which the DEA alleged that Mallinckrodt “sold excessive amounts of the most highly abused forms of oxycodone, 30 mg and 15 mg tablets, placing them into a stream of commerce that would result in diversion.”According to the DEA, the filing states, “even though Mallinckrodt knew of the pattern of excessive sales of its oxycodone feeding massive diversion, it continued to incentivize and supply these suspicious sales,” and never notified the DEA of the suspicious orders.In a settlement with the DEA, Mallinckrodt agreed that from Jan. 1, 2008, through Jan. 1, 2012, “certain aspects of Mallinckrodt’s system to monitor and detect suspicious orders did not meet the standards” outlined in letters from the DEA deputy administrator for diversion control.Mallinckrodt was the nation’s leading manufacturer of oxycodone and hydrocodone, with 28.8 billion pills from 2006 to 2012, 37.7% of the market, according to the DEA database. It has since created a subsidiary for its generic opioids called SpecGx.In 2017 federal prosecutors said 500 million of the company’s 30 mg oxycodone pills wound up in Florida between 2008 and 2012 – 66% of all oxycodone sold in the state. Pills at that dosage are among the most widely abused.Prosecutors said the company failed to report suspicious orders, and Mallinckrodt that year settled the case by paying a $ 35m fine.“Mallinckrodt’s actions and omissions formed a link in the chain of supply that resulted in millions of oxycodone pills being sold on the street,” then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions said at the time.Walgreens used a formula to identify thousands of pharmacy orders as suspicious but shipped them anyway, the filing alleges. The orders were reported to the DEA after they had been shipped, according to agency documents quoted in the filing.“Suspicious orders are to be reported as discovered, not in a collection of monthly completed transactions,” the DEA wrote in an immediate suspension order issued against Walgreens in 2012. “Notwithstanding the ample guidance available, Walgreens has failed to maintain an adequate suspicious order reporting system and as a result, has ignored readily identifiable orders and ordering patterns that, based on the information available throughout the Walgreens Corporation, should have been obvious signs of diversion.”In one case, Walgreens’s suspicious order report to the DEA was 1,712 pages long and contained six months’ worth of orders, including reports on 836 pharmacies in more than a dozen states and Puerto Rico, the filing alleges.The filing also alleges that Walgreens stores could “place ad hoc ‘PDQ’ (”pretty darn quick”) orders to controlled substances outside of their normal order days and outside of the [suspicious order monitoring] analysis and limits.”Peviously, Kristine Atwell, who managed distribution of controlled substances for the company’s warehouse in Jupiter, Florida, sent an email on Jan 10, 2011, to corporate headquarters urging that some of the stores be required to justify their large quantity of orders.“I ran a query to see how many bottles we have sent to store 3836 and we have shipped them 3271 bottles between 12/1/10 and 1/10/11,” Atwell wrote. “I don’t know how they can even house this many bottle[s] to be honest. How do we go about checking the validity of these orders?”A bottle sent by a wholesaler generally contains 100 pills.Walgreens never checked, the DEA said. Between April 2010 and February 2012, the Jupiter distribution centre sent 13.7 million oxycodone doses to six Florida stores, records show, many times the norm, the DEA said.Walgreens ranked second among distributors in the nation, with 13 billion pills and 16.5% of the market for oxycodone and hydrocodone from 2006 through 2012, the DEA database shows. It stopped distributing opioids to its stores in 2014, but continues to dispense controlled substances.As part of a settlement with the DEA in June 2013, Walgreens said that its “suspicious order reporting for distribution to certain pharmacies did not meet the standards identified by DEA.” The company paid an $ 80 million fine to the government.In a statement earlier in the week, Walgreens defended its operations, saying, “Walgreens has been an industry leader in combating this crisis in the communities where our pharmacists live and work.”The Washington Post



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What If America Lost a Carrier in a War with Iran?

What If America Lost a Carrier in a War with Iran?The Navy simply lacks enough ships and aircraft to meet the increasing demands of its global mission. The recent oil tanker attacks in the Gulf of Oman reinforce the need to reestablish a highly visible U.S. naval deterrent in the Middle East. For eight months last year, no aircraft carrier strike group plied the region, the longest such interruption this millennium. With the United States needing a more robust posture against Iran and confronting renewed challenges in Asia and Europe, several immediate measures and concerted longer-term efforts are critical to ensure America has the carriers it needs.The requirement to maintain carrier presence in the Middle East is a critical part of a broader national security strategy, in which U.S. global security interests necessitate a worldwide force presence. Indeed, the Navy's mission demands remain as high as those of the Cold War, calling on ships to be everywhere seemingly at once, but today's fleet is less than half the size it was 30 years ago.During the Obama administration, a “rebalance” supposedly allowed the Pentagon to focus on Asia and Europe while washing its hands of the Middle East. In reality, we never effectively rebalanced forces in the Indo-Pacific, and the situation on the ground forced us to remain deeply involved in the Middle East. Now with a growing Iranian threat, it would be imprudent to suddenly abandon the region, even as we face renewed challenges in the Pacific, Atlantic and Mediterranean.(This first appeared in June 2019.)



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The California hiker who was found after spending 4 days alone in the wilderness says she got lost after fleeing a man with a knife

The California hiker who was found after spending 4 days alone in the wilderness says she got lost after fleeing a man with a knifeSheryl Powell, 60, disappeared on Friday while on a camping trip with her husband. Search teams found her alive and well on Monday.



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Police officer who lost his job after shooting an unarmed man is ‘rehired to collect lifetime pension’

Police officer who lost his job after shooting an unarmed man is ‘rehired to collect lifetime pension’A police officer who was charged with murder for shooting an unarmed man in a hotel hallway was reportedly rehired temporarily so he could collect a pension, local media reports.Philip Brailsford, who killed Daniel Shaver at La Quinta hotel in Arizona in 2016, reportedly came to the agreement last year with the Mesa city manager's office. This allowed him to apply for a disability pension on the basis of a medical retirement in a reversal of his firing by the department after the shooting.He will receive a lifetime pension of around $ 30,000 per year.The agreement was first reported by local news outlets in Arizona, which obtained the settlement agreement that the city reached with Mr Brailsford last August.Mr Shaver's shooting captured media attention across the US when it happened in 2016, and again after Mr Brailsford's trial when his body camera video was released.Police were called to the hotel in January 2016 following a complaint about a man with a rifle in one of the rooms. Mr Shaver, 26, had been showing a legal pellet gun that he used in his job in pest control, to a woman in the room with him.Body camera footage begins with the confrontation between Mr Brailsford, other officers, and Mr Shaver and the woman. Mr Shaver complies with a series of confusing commands from the responding officers, putting his hands up and lying down on the ground.They threaten to kill him multiple times for not complying with their orders."If you move, we're going to consider that a threat and we are going to deal with it and you may not survive it," one officer says. "Please do not shoot me," Mr Shaver says at one point, his hands in the air. But Mr Brailsford opened fire after Mr Shaver appeared to reach behind himself while crawling towards the officers. He was struck five times.Mr Brailsford, who was carrying an AR-15 rifle with the phrase "You're F****d" etched into the weapon, according to a police report, was charged with murder for the shooting and fired from his job soon after.He testified in court that he believed Mr Shaver was reaching for a gun and would have done the same thing again.He was acquitted in November 2017 after a six-week trial on both second-degree murder and reckless manslaughter charges.The settlement notes that Mr Brailsford has been treated for post-traumatic stress disorder. Michael Piccarreta, his lawyer, told ABC 15 his PTSD stemmed from the shooting incident and criminal prosecution. Mesa City manager Chris Brady told ABC 15 that Mr Brailsford's PTSD claim dates to before his trial. "So in fairness he was given the opportunity to make that appeal to the board," he said. The shooting prompted a multimillion-dollar lawsuit filed by Mr Shaver's family, which is still pending.Washington Post



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Northern California town of Paradise lost 90% of its population after Camp Fire, data shows

Northern California town of Paradise lost 90% of its population after Camp Fire, data showsThe town of Paradise has lost over 90% of its population since the Camp Fire last year, according to data California released Thursday.



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Trump Lost on the Census, but the Scandal Is Just Getting Started

Trump Lost on the Census, but the Scandal Is Just Getting StartedAlex Wong/GettyPresident Donald Trump may think the census citizenship question scandal is over now that he’s declared victory and marched away in defeat.But he’s wrong. The citizenship question may be finished, but the scandal is just getting started.Forget Trump’s order to compile data from “vast federal databases” on citizenship. Not only is that insignificant—it’s what the Census Bureau itself had recommended instead of messing with the census form itself by asking about citizenship. Trump Declares From the Rose Garden He’s Not Owned on the CensusWhat’s actually meaningful are the two lawsuits over the citizenship question and the congressional investigations over what Trump officials knew and when. And all of those are still ongoing.Why? Because, at this point, those investigations are about the lies the administration told, not the underlying question itself: the cover-up, not the crime, so to speak. And those are all live legal questions.First, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Monday that the House of Representatives will vote “soon” on a contempt of Congress resolution against Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and Attorney General William Barr. That vote stems from the two officials’ refusal to hand over reams of subpoenaed documents related to the census question. And whether those two officials acted in contempt of Congress has nothing to do with whether the citizenship question is alive or dead. If they ignored the subpoenas, that’s contempt, regardless of the context.Barr and Ross stood alongside Trump at his Thursday press conference, but they may soon have to stand in a dock in court, defending themselves against contempt charges.Second, the primary lawsuit over the census is still ongoing in a federal court in New York, after the Supreme Court authorized the court to continue proceedings regarding the “incongruent” explanations for the citizenship question provided by the Trump administration. While some parts of those proceedings may now be moot, several parts are not. Plaintiffs—including the ACLU, the state of New York, and the New York Immigration Coalition—have asked the court to levy sanctions against government officials who, they say, lied during court proceedings. To adjudicate that claim, plaintiffs have asked for additional “discovery,” the legal term for obtaining documents, deposing witnesses, and otherwise conducting a detailed, exhaustive investigation.In fact, these two investigations may be just getting started.Just in the New York case, plaintiffs are eager to explore the newly unearthed files of deceased Republican operative Thomas Hofeller, who said that gaining citizenship data through the census might enable states to redraw congressional districts based on eligible voters, rather than total population. That would help Republicans and “non-Hispanic whites,” Hofeller wrote.Remarkably, Trump and Barr even alluded to Hofeller’s rationale for harvesting citizenship data in their remarks in the Rose Garden: Trump said the data could be used to draw congressional districts, and Barr said that states “may want to draw districts based on eligible voters, not the total number of persons.”Those are shocking statements, and completely different from what the Trump administration told the public, courts, and Congress about why the citizenship data was needed. But there’s probably a lot more than just that one remark in the hard drives Hofeller left behind, and plaintiffs in the New York case are determined to find out.Then there are the congressional investigations.In addition to the ignored subpoenas, it’s clear—as I noted as early as last October—that Ross lied under oath to Congress. Ross said that he only added the citizenship question in December 2017, after a request from the Department of Justice and a public comment period. But a letter Ross wrote seven months earlier, in May 2017, said that he had already requested the question be added. And there are numerous other examples. Ross lied under oath about his meetings with White House advisers Steve Bannon and Kris Kobach, both ardent nationalists. DOJ officials lied about the influence of Hofeller, covered up their conversations about changing census confidentiality rules to share data with ICE, and lied about the chain of events leading up to the proposed change.In his press conference, Trump tried to make the citizenship question about loyalty and patriotism. Democrats, he said, “want to erase the existence of a very important word: citizen.” They want to “conceal the number of illegal aliens in our midst. Probably because that number is far greater, far higher than anyone would have believed.”But the Democrats aren’t the ones who hatched a secret plan to weaponize the census against immigrant communities and then lied about it over and over again. Trump officials are. And they are going to have to answer for it.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.



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No Matter 18,000 Lost Jobs, Germany OK With Deutsche Bank Cull

No Matter 18,000 Lost Jobs, Germany OK With Deutsche Bank Cull(Bloomberg) — Chancellor Angela Merkel’s government will look past Deutsche Bank AG’s cutting a fifth of its workforce as the German lender commits to an overhaul.Chief Executive Officer Christian Sewing’s bid to reboot the bank is viewed in Berlin as a necessary change, according to an official with direct knowledge of the issue who asked not to be named. Despite the headline 18,000 job cuts, normally a red flag for politicians, the Frankfurt-based lender’s makeover is seen as necessary to cut fat and boost the bank’s profitability. In addition, the government welcomes a step back from investment banking and a renewed focus on German businesses.Deutsche Bank’s failure in April to combine with Commerzbank AG, in which the government has a stake of about 15.5%, was a stinging defeat for Finance Minister Olaf Scholz, whose bid to rescue a potential national champion got little public support from across the political spectrum.That left Deutsche Bank to its own devices and Sewing on Sunday pledged to do what many in Germany’s political ranks have always called on it to do: drop its ambitions as a global investment bank and return to its German-lending roots.Olav Gutting, a lawmaker for Merkel’s Christian Democratic Union who sits on the finance committee of the lower house of parliament, called the overhaul “bold” given a challenging business environment in which lending money is hardly profitable any more. “This is very ambitious,” Gutting, who in the past has ruled out any form of state involvement in helping Deutsche Bank, said in a message, adding that job cuts naturally concerned politicians. “But I’m crossing my fingers, because we need a Deutsche Bank present globally.”A spokesman at Germany’s Finance Ministry declined to comment on the overhaul plans.Markets have had a mixed view on the overhaul for a bank viewed by German regulators as systemically relevant, with risk gauges falling and its euro convertible bonds climbing. Deutsche Bank shares fell 1.7% in afternoon trading after seesawing in the morning. (Updates with CDU lawmaker comments in fifth, sixth paragraphs.)To contact the reporters on this story: Patrick Donahue in Berlin at pdonahue1@bloomberg.net;Birgit Jennen in Berlin at bjennen1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Ben Sills at bsills@bloomberg.net, Raymond ColittFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.



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Manslaughter charges for woman who lost baby after being shot in stomach dismissed by prosecutors following outcry

Manslaughter charges for woman who lost baby after being shot in stomach dismissed by prosecutors following outcryA woman indicted for manslaughter after losing her unborn baby when she was shot has had the charge dropped.Marshae Jones, of Birmingham, Alabama, lost the foetus after being blasted in the stomach following a fight in December.The 28-year-old was arrested last week after a grand jury decided she had caused the death by initiating the brawl while knowing she was five months pregnant.But, following a global outcry, a Jefferson County district attorney announced the charges were being discontinued on Wednesday.Lynneice Washington said: "After reviewing the facts of this case and the applicable state law, I have determined that it is not in the best interest of justice to pursue prosecution of Ms Jones. There are no winners, only losers, in this sad ordeal.”No further explanation was offered for the sudden change or any rationale given for how grand jurors returned the indictment in the first place.Ms Jones’ lawyers said she was pleased with the decision and urged her supporters to now direct their energy to "ensuring that what happened to Marshae won't ever happen again".They had previously called the charge "flawed and twisted", saying it “defies the most basic logic and analysis”.The case came shortly after Alabama passed America’s most hard-line anti-abortion legislation.The new laws, passed earlier this year, make performing an abortion at any stage of pregnancy a crime punishable by life in prison for the provider. It makes no exception for pregnancies resulting from rape or incest.Officials denied Jones’ indictment had anything to do with the legislation but her case sparked outrage across the US and wider world among pro-choice campaigners and advocates for women's rights.Many pointed out the charge was another clear example of the state attempting to punish women for so-called crimes related to their pregnancies.Legal scholars said the arrest raised questions about what other scenarios – such as driving a car or swimming in a pool – could constitute putting a foetus in danger.Jeffery Robinson, deputy legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union, welcomed the charges being dropped, saying the decision "represents precisely what we want to see in these critical moments: a prosecutor who is not afraid to use prosecutorial discretion and power to refuse to prosecute when the law and justice demands that charges should be dropped."Lynn Paltrow, executive director of National Advocates for Pregnant Women, said she was pleased to see the case dismissed but noted it would be a mistake to see it as an outlier.She said: “We hope there are no more cases like this in the future, but our experience in 40 years of cases suggests that we will see many more such misuses of the law in the name of foetal personhood in the future.”Ms Jones’ attacker, 23-year-old Ebony Jemison, had manslaughter charges against her dismissed earlier this year. She herself had said she felt the indictment of her rival was unjust.



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Search Continues for 2-Year-Old Reported Lost In Rio Grande River

Search Continues for 2-Year-Old Reported Lost In Rio Grande RiverMother told Border Patrol agents she lost her 2-year-old daughter while crossing the Rio Grande river into Texas.



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Jimmy Carter: Investigation would show Trump lost 2016 election

Jimmy Carter: Investigation would show Trump lost 2016 electionFormer President Jimmy Carter said Friday morning that Donald Trump is an illegitimate president due to Russian interference in the 2016 election.



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