Tag Archives: lost

As Iran missiles battered Iraq base, US lost eyes in sky

As Iran missiles battered Iraq base, US lost eyes in skyAin al-Asad Air Base (Iraq) (AFP) – Moments after volleys of Iranian missiles began to batter Iraq's Ain al-Asad airbase, US soldiers at the desert facility lost contact with their ultra-powerful — and expensive — eyes in the sky. At the time the attack was launched at 1:35 am on January 8, the US army was flying seven unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) over Iraq to monitor bases where US-led coalition forces are deployed. "We thought it may lead to a ground assault, so we kept the aircraft up," said one of the pilots, 26-year-old Staff Sergeant Costin Herwig.



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A local news photographer was filming a car accident when an 18-wheel truck lost control and slammed into the scene

A local news photographer was filming a car accident when an 18-wheel truck lost control and slammed into the sceneThe truck hits two vehicles before jackknifing and landing on a pickup before sliding and finally coming to a halt.



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Australia fires: Minister says up to 30 per cent of koalas may have been lost in bushfire crisis

Australia fires: Minister says up to 30 per cent of koalas may have been lost in bushfire crisisOne of Australia’s most famous animals is now a threatened species, with the country’s bushfire crisis wiping out huge numbers of koalas. Sussan Ley, the environment minister said Friday that the Mid North Coast of New South Wales, home to a sizeable part of Australia’s koala population, may have lost 30 per cent of its koalas. In an interview with the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, Ms Ley said 30 per cent of koala habitat had been destroyed in the region.  She added: “We will know more when the fires are calmed down and a proper assessment can be made”. Before the fire crisis began it was estimated that up to 28,000 koalas lived in the Mid North Coast. Eight people have died in New South Wales alone, and about 3.4million hectares and almost 1,000 homes have been lost to the long-running bushfire crisis. Queensland, South Australia, Victoria and Western Australia have also faced large, emergency-level fires this fire season. Australian wildfire status Early on Friday the NSW Rural Fire Service (RFS) issued a “very high fire danger rating” for many parts of the state. In a statement, the RFS said there were “almost 1,300 firefighters in the field. Over 70 bush and grass fires, 33 uncontained”. Late in the day, it warned that Saturday would see “widespread very high fire danger”. South Australia’s Country Fire Service (CFS) assistant chief officer Brenton Eden told The Advertiser that the state is extremely dry and the conditions and coming heatwave poses a serious threat. “We are seeing fire behaviour across SA, Victoria and NSW that we haven’t seen and experienced for a long time… These fires are now travelling immense distances and covering an enormous amount of the landscape before people are prepared either to defend their property or to get out,” he said. “Cudlee Creek has been the most classic example recently, together with Yorketown, of fires that have started from a very small ignition source… The CFS responded within minutes to them and had no capacity to bring them under control.” Mr Eden warned that the two fires that have burnt through a total of 42,300 hectares of land at Cudlee Creek in the Adelaide Hills, and in Duncan, on Kangaroo Island, would continue to burn for weeks. “It’s tinder dry and ready to burn and that’s what we’re seeing at the moment,” he said. As the crisis continues there is renewed pressure on Scott Morrison, the prime minister, to reform Australia’s firefighting services and infrastructure. Weeks after he rejected calls to transform Australia’s largely volunteer bush firefighting services into professional organisations, one of Mr Morrison’s own senior Ministers has called for change. As three large fires raged in his electorate of Gippsland, Victoria, Veterans' Affairs Minister and Nationals MP Darren Chester said this week that there is strong support among his constituents to pay volunteers when they worked for extended periods.  Veteran NSW fire fighter Brendan Hurley, writing for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, said: “I've been a firefighter for 20 years and these fires have delivered the worst conditions I've ever faced. We have been responding to bushfires since the end of September and it is fair to say that as we move further into the campaign fatigue is setting in.” And one week after the uproar over Mr Morrison's Hawaiian holiday, New South Wales Emergency Services Minister David Elliott is leaving the country for a trip to the UK and France. His office said the Minister would not cancel his trip, but in a statement Mr Elliott said he would return home, “if the bushfire situation should demand it”. Mr Morrison’s Liberal Party is also in power at a state level in New South Wales.



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The Surveillance State Quietly Lost a Major Court Case

The Surveillance State Quietly Lost a Major Court CaseRepublicans are publicly howling at the U.S. surveillance panopticon now that it ensnared Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign. But it’s hard to believe they’ll do much to actually constrain it. When they controlled Congress, whatever Trump-prompted hesitancy Republicans had about the government’s broadest and most intrusive activities dissolved when it was time to renew the authorities underlying them for another five years. They joined congressional Democrats in resurrecting those authorities, continuing an act of genuine bipartisanship that ravenously eats away at Americans’ freedom.Relief may come instead from the courts. A little-noticed ruling earlier this month from a federal appellate court took a modest step toward curbing the FBI’s practice of searching—warrantless—for Americans’ data inside the National Security Agency’s dragnets ostensibly aimed at foreigners. Congress may be disinclined to close what’s known as the “backdoor search provision,” but there’s a renewed chance the courts might. In September 2011, authorities arrested Albanian citizen and Brooklyn resident Agron Hasbajrami at Kennedy Airport. Hasbajrami had a one-way ticket to Turkey and, prosecutors said, a plan to continue on to Pakistan to pursue jihad. Facing federal charges, Hasbajrami asked prosecutors if evidence against him derived from warrantless surveillance. In secret, they had collected Hasbajrami’s emails through surveillance resulting from Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA), which permits the NSA to collect massive amounts of internet communications and associated data, including from Americans’ international conversations, all without judicial approval or individual suspicion. Once obtained, the feds applied for a FISA warrant on Hasbajrami, thereby laundering their illicit surveillance for use in prosecuting him. Send The Daily Beast a TipThe government, following a practice of not revealing how such surveillance impacts criminal prosecutions, deceitfully neglected to tell Hasbajrami how they got his emails in the first place. As a result, Hasbajrami pleaded guilty in 2012 and began serving a 16-year sentence for material support to terrorism. But after the 2013 revelations of mass surveillance Edward Snowden provided to The Guardian and The Washington Post, the Justice Department revealed to Hasbajrami that it had lied to him. Hasbajrami argued that he had been denied critical information underlying his decision to plead guilty—as well as a shot at arguing his prosecution was unconstitutional—withdrew his plea, and sought to suppress the ill-gotten evidence. The case made its way to the Second Circuit Court of Appeals, which issued its ruling on Dec. 18. Judges in the case did not deal anything close to a death blow to Section 702. But, in a first for a federal appellate court, the judges found that warrantlessly searching through the NSA’s Section 702 databases, as the FBI and the CIA are permitted to do, “could violate the Fourth Amendment, and thus require the suppression of evidence.” Considering themselves without sufficient information to rule on the merits, they instructed the district court to investigate whether “such querying was reasonable.” That’s a far cry from stopping either the NSA’s warrantless mass collection of internet data or the FBI’s warrantless searches of what the NSA collects. It’s uncertain what the district court will ascertain. But the appellate-court ruling is a step toward judicially mandated constraints on, at least, the downstream effects of such surveillance, and those effects include locking people up, so civil libertarians took what they could get. “Critically, the court holds that the government does not have carte blanche to amass Americans’ emails and phone calls and search through them at will,” noted the ACLU’s Patrick Toomey, who submitted a brief in the case. The ruling comes after the secret spy panel known as the FISA Court ruled that the FBI’s use of the backdoor search provision is overbroad, abusive and illegal. On one single day in December 2017, according to the court, the FBI conducted 6,800 searches through NSA databases of ostensibly foreign information using Americans’ Social Security numbers. More broadly, the FBI’s searches, the court found, were not “reasonably designed” to find evidence of crime, but were instead fishing expeditions. The total number of Americans surveilled remains unknown. The revelation that the FBI abused the backdoor-search provision made no political impact, as it concerned millions of Americans not named Donald Trump and its major effects will be felt by Muslims. Along with the Hasbajrami ruling, it highlights how the erosion of Americans’ privacy, at scale, occurs with vastly fewer safeguards than the process to surveil Carter Page, a Trump campaign foreign-policy adviser who had been proximate to Russian intelligence for years.The FBI had to detail for the FISA Court why it believed Page was a legitimate target for foreign-agent surveillance and do so every 90 days for as long as it wished the surveillance to continue. In practice, Justice Department inspector general Michael Horowitz found, the applications to the FISA Court on Page contained material flaws, such as the omission of evidence that undercut the government’s basis for the surveillance. As egregious as the FBI’s manipulation of that process was in Page’s case, no such process applies for surveillance under Section 702, which affects orders of magnitude more people. The director of national intelligence and the attorney general merely submit annual guidelines to the FISA Court purporting to describe how the mass surveillance will unfold. The government needs neither probable cause nor reasonable suspicion that any of the millions of people caught in the NSA dragnet committed any wrongdoing—only confidence that the supposed “target” of the surveillance is reasonably believed to be a foreigner overseas. Nor does the FBI require any judicial approval for any of its searches for Americans’ data in the NSA digital storehouses. The appellate court in the Hasbajrami case called it “programmatic pre-clearance” for surveillance on a scale unthinkable even a generation ago. This sort of surveillance has proven a fixture of contemporary American life, however undetected it typically goes. Attempts at modifying it or abolishing it, launched by the civil-libertarian minorities of both parties, typically fall short. A recent effort at abolishing a highly abused domestic phone-data surveillance program wrapped into the PATRIOT Act was obviated by a Congressional budget deal that kept that and three other expiring PATRIOT provisions alive until March. One of the few consistent congressional opponents of overbroad surveillance is Sen. Ron Wyden, an Oregon Democrat on the intelligence committee who has fought the backdoor-search provision since its inception. “I’m glad some of my pro-surveillance colleagues are now interested in protecting Americans against unnecessary government surveillance. But anyone who has concerns about warrants overseen by a judge should be far more worried by backdoor searches of vast numbers of Americans’ communications—searches performed without any court order whatsoever,” Wyden told The Daily Beast. “When Sen. [Rand] Paul and I tried to reform this program last year, these same members voted against even modest reforms to protect Americans’ rights. Let’s be sure that protecting civil liberties applies to all Americans, not just Donald Trump and his cronies.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.



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Pakistan Won in Afghanistan (While America Lost)

Pakistan Won in Afghanistan (While America Lost)How did this happen?



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Father who lost wife, sons says life 'turned upside down'

Father who lost wife, sons says life 'turned upside down'A U.S. citizen who lost his wife and two of his sons when they were ambushed by gunmen in Mexico said his life has been upended and he’s leaving the country with the rest of his family, ABC News reported. David Langford told ABC’s “World News Tonight” Sunday that “my whole life has turned upside down. Langford’s wife, Dawna, and two of his sons, Trevor Langford, 11, and Rogan Langford, 2, were among the nine women and children killed in the ambush Monday in the Mexican state of Sonora.



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Camp Fire survivor who lost home in deadly blaze bilked of thousands of dollars, police say

Camp Fire survivor who lost home in deadly blaze bilked of thousands of dollars, police sayBrenda Rose Asbury is accused of embezzling more than $ 60,000 from an elderly woman who survived the deadly Camp Fire in Paradise, California



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Lost Second World War submarine HMS Urge discovered off Malta

Lost Second World War submarine HMS Urge discovered off MaltaA Second World War submarine paid for by charity dances and card games has been found more than 70 years after it vanished. The wreck of HMS Urge, which was built with money raised by the people of Bridgend in south Wales, was discovered by a University of Malta survey team two miles off the coast of the island. The discovery came after Francis Dickinson, the grandson of HMS Urge's captain Lieutenant-Commander E.P. Tomkinson, requested the university team search an area that had been heavily mined during the Nazi's two-and-a-half year siege of the island.  A sonar image revealed a submarine-like shape at a depth of 130 metres.     "The damage to the bow shows a very violent explosion … indicating that the ship would have sunk very fast giving no chance to anybody to survive from this tragedy," said professor Timothy Gambin, who led the team. A graphic illustration compares a picture of a U-Class Submarine to a Sonar image of the wreck of HMS Urge Credit: UNIVERSITY OF MALTA/PROJECT SPUR/VIA REUTERS "Besides the damage on the bow, the wreck is in absolutely fantastic condition. It is sitting upright on the seabed, very proud, in the direction that it was ordered to take on its way to Alexandria," he told Malta's PBS. The U-class submarine disappeared in 1942 after being ordered with other vessels to sail from Malta to Egypt, with the loss of all 32 crew, 11 Royal Navy passengers, and a journalist.  She put to sea on April 27, but never made the rendezvous in Alexandria on May 6. The wreck of a submarine, which the University of Malta says is Britain's HMS Urge that vanished during World War Two, is seen lying at the bottom of the sea off Malta Credit: University of Malta/Project Spur/via Reuters   The Royal Navy and most family members have long said she was most likely sunk by a mine shortly after putting to sea, a theory confirmed by the discovery. Another theory, based on German naval reports, suggested that she was sunk on 29 April by a dive-bomber as she tried to attack an Italian vessel near Libya.  Those lost included Bernard Gray, a British war correspondent who had previously covered the Dunkirk evacuation and is thought to have used his connections to wangle a berth on the vessel so he could cover the war in North Africa.  His presence on the vessel was only confirmed in 2002 following an inquiry by archivists at the Royal Navy Submarine museum. A ceremony to declare the site an official war grave will take place in April.



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Warren Admits Universal Medicare Would Result in Two Million Lost Jobs

Warren Admits Universal Medicare Would Result in Two Million Lost JobsSenator Elizabeth Warren (D., Mass.) agreed on Wednesday with an assessment that a "medicare for all" plan would eliminate roughly two million jobs.Warren was speaking during an interview at New Hampshire Public Radio."An economist at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, told Kaiser Health News earlier this year that that could result in about 2 million jobs lost," mostly within the healthcare industry, said NHPR reporter Casey McDermott."So I agree," Warren replied. "I think this is part of the cost issue and should be part of a cost plan."The economist cited by McDermott, Robert Pollin of the Political Economy Research Institute at the University of Massachusetts, had stated politicians who want to set up a "medicare for all" system would need a plan for how to treat those who would lose their jobs.Warren previously said she hasn't nailed down the specifics of her medicare proposal. The Senator has vacillated between endorsing Bernie Sanders's plan and calling it a "framework," whose details she plans to fill out.In the Wednesday interview, McDermott asked Warren when prospective voters would be able to see her full medicare proposal."Soon," Warren answered. She also declined to specify whether the plan would raise taxes on middle class workers."We will see most likely rich people's costs go up, corporations costs go up, but the costs to middle class families will go down," Warren asserted. "I will not sign any legislation into law for which costs for middle class families do not go down."Sanders on Tuesday also declined to provide specific details as to how he would pay for his universal medicare plan.""You're asking me to come up with an exact detailed plan of how every American — how much you're going to pay more in taxes, how much I'm going to pay," Sanders told CNBC. "I don't think I have to do that right now."



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Lost WWII British submarine finally found

Lost WWII British submarine finally foundThe wreck of a British submarine, which vanished at the height of World War II, has been discovered lying at the bottom of the sea off Malta, marine archaeologists said on Thursday.



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