Tag Archives: loses

Man loses foot, another seriously injured in shark attack while snorkeling in Australia

Man loses foot, another seriously injured in shark attack while snorkeling in AustraliaThe shark attack occurred in Hook Passage in the Whitsunday Islands off Australia's Queensland coast, rescuers say.



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Macron Says U.K. Shouldn’t Get New Delay If Johnson Loses Vote

Macron Says U.K. Shouldn’t Get New Delay If Johnson Loses Vote(Bloomberg) — French President Emmanuel Macron heaped pressure on the British Parliament to back Boris Johnson’s Brexit deal, saying the U.K.’s departure from the European Union shouldn’t be delayed a moment longer.With Parliament due to vote on the revised agreement on Saturday, Macron’s remarks echoed the message Johnson himself has been sending to reticent MPs: it’s now or never. "I don’t think a new extension should be granted," Macron told reporters after a summit of EU leaders in Brussels, where the deal had been rubber stamped. "The Oct. 31 deadline must be met."Macron’s stance increases the risk that the U.K. will crash out of the EU without a deal on Oct. 31. But the reality is more nuanced, according to EU diplomats who doubt the bloc will ever throw the U.K. off a cliff without a safety net. The pound dipped on the comments, and then recovered.Selling the DealAfter sealing a revised deal with the EU on Thursday, Johnson is spending Friday frantically talking to politicians from his own and other parties as he tries to rustle up a majority. The prime minister needs to add 61 votes to the tally his predecessor Theresa May managed when her version of the Brexit deal was defeated for a third and final time in March.The new agreement differs from May’s agreement because only Northern Ireland rather than the whole U.K. will continue to apply the EU’s customs rules. That’s upset the province’s Democratic Unionist Party whose MPs say they won’t back Johnson’s deal on Saturday.If Johnson loses the vote, he’s obliged by law to request from the EU another extension by the end of the day. But any postponement must be approved unanimously by the EU’s 27 leaders so Macron would have a veto.EU officials were expecting such an intervention by Macron, who made similar noises before approving a Brexit delay in April, but they said that it’s very unlikely that he or any other leader would prevent another one, particularly if the U.K. was headed for a general election. While the bloc is just as keen to get Britain’s departure over the line as Johnson, it considers a no-deal exit in two weeks a far worse prospect than another postponement.Envoys from the 27 remaining countries and the European Commission are due to meet on Sunday to discuss next steps should Johnson’s deal fall.The French have consistently taken a hard line in Brexit negotiations and Macron argues that the tight deadline he insisted on the last time the process was extended helped force Johnson into concessions. Several EU governments privately now regret delaying Brexit from April until October, acknowledging that it took the pressure of the U.K. to pass a deal."I was alone and I don’t think I was wrong," Macron said, referring to the decision six months ago.Other leaders were more circumspect on the issue, with Leo Varadkar, the prime minister of Ireland, which stands to be affected most by a no-deal Brexit, saying a delay isn’t guaranteed and Luxembourg premier Xavier Bettel insisting the ball was now in the U.K. Parliament’s court.“We have done our job,” he said. “There’s a plan A, but there’s no plan B."(Updates with context throughout.)\–With assistance from Stephanie Bodoni.To contact the reporters on this story: Helene Fouquet in Paris at hfouquet1@bloomberg.net;Ian Wishart in Brussels at iwishart@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Ben Sills at bsills@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.



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Germany's far-right AfD loses support after synagogue shooting: report

Germany's far-right AfD loses support after synagogue shooting: reportGermany’s far-right Alternative for Germany (AfD) party has dropped in public opinion polls after an anti-Semitic gun attack near a synagogue in Halle on Wednesday, broadcaster RTL/n-tv reported on Saturday. A survey of 2,500 Germans by research institute forsa showed 11% support for AfD on Thursday, down from 13% at the beginning of the week, RTL/n-tv reported. Prosecutors said a man accused of killing two people in the gun attack in Halle, eastern Germany, had confessed to the crime and to a far-right, anti-Semitic motivation.



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GOP Sen. Ron Johnson Loses It on ‘Meet the Press’: I Do Not Trust the FBI or CIA

GOP Sen. Ron Johnson Loses It on ‘Meet the Press’: I Do Not Trust the FBI or CIAIn an extremely contentious and heated interview with Meet the Press anchor Chuck Todd on Sunday, Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI) declared that he does not trust the CIA or FBI while launching into a series of conspiratorial attacks on Democrats and intelligence officials regarding the Ukraine scandal.Johnson—who last week said he was told about a quid pro quo involving Ukrainian investigation into the 2016 election and that President Trump blocked him from telling Ukraine military aid was coming—immediately began his interview on the defensive, complaining that Todd was biased and the president was being sabotaged.The Republican senator then proceeded to accuse former members of the FBI and CIA of conspiring to set up the president after his election, claiming this has “everything to do with Ukraine.”“Why a Fox News conspiracy propaganda stuff is popping up on here, I have no idea,” an exasperated Todd noted at one point.“It is not, that is exactly, because this is going over the line, exactly why President Trump is upset and why his supporters are upset with the news media,” Johnson shouted, to which Todd replied: “Can we please answer the question that I asked you instead of trying to make Donald Trump feel better here that you are not criticizing him?”Eventually, Johnson would tell Todd that the reason he “winced” when he heard about military aid being attached to Ukrainian investigations into the 2016 election is he didn’t want to see those two things connected, adding that Trump “adamantly denied” to him that was occurring. He would then go on to support a probe by Ukraine into the Democrats surrounding the last presidential election.“Ukrainian officials reportedly helped Clinton allies research Trump’s advisers,” he huffed. “There is potential interference in the 2016 campaign. That’s what Trump wants to get to the bottom of. But the press doesn’t want to.”Johnson added: “I’m being called a conspiracy theorist, John Solomon is, because the press is horribly biased and Trump and his supporters completely understand that.”Todd confronted Johnson on whether or not he believes former Trump campaign chief Paul Manafort was framed and if the Russians interfered in the 2016 election to benefit Trump. After saying he doesn’t think Manafort was framed and the Russian “absolutely” meddled in the election, Johnson pivoted back to supposed Ukrainian involvement during the 2016 campaign.“There are a lot of unanswered questions,” the senator exclaimed. “Chuck, I just want the truth. The American people want the truth.”“So do you not trust the FBI? Do you not trust the CIA?” Todd wondered, causing Johnson to yell back: “No, no, I don’t. Absolutely not. After Peter Strzok and Lisa Page, after James Comey?!”After Johnson said he didn’t trust anyone from the Obama administration, Todd asked him if he trusted the organizations now.“No I didn’t trust them back then,” Johnson replied before listing off a series of former officials who have become favorite targets of the president's supporters.Todd, clearly out of patience with Johnson at the end, suggested Johnson was only interested in the truth that was “politically comfortable” for him before getting in one final parting shot.“I’m sorry that you chose to come on this way, senator.”Chuck Todd on NBC’s 2020 Debate Plans, Why He ‘Can’t Quit’ Rudy Giuliani and Won’t ‘Ban’ Kellyanne ConwayRead more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.



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Taiwan Loses Second Ally This Week to China

Taiwan Loses Second Ally This Week to China(Bloomberg) — For Taiwan, the Pacific Islands had been relatively stable as China siphoned off diplomatic partners elsewhere after independence-leaning President Tsai Ing-wen took power in 2016. That all changed this week.On Monday, the Solomon Islands — one of the biggest economies in the region — recognized China and ended formal relations with Taiwan that began in 1983. Kiribati followed suit in news that broke on Friday. Before the defections, Taiwan hadn’t lost a friend in the region since 2004.Taiwan now has just 15 diplomatic partners worldwide, including four in the Pacific. At least two of those relationships are also looking shaky, as China’s spending spree of $ 1.6 billion in aid and loans to the region since 2011 — more than four times the amount Taiwan has been able to contribute — has outmatched the democratically-run island.“The defections show that Taiwan has hit the ceiling on how much it’s willing to pay to keep its allies in the Pacific,” said Jonathan Pryke, who researches the Pacific Islands at Sydney-based think tank the Lowy Institute. “Ultimately for these countries, it’s an economic decision, not a foreign policy one. But for China the main game here is the marginalization of Taiwan, and it also solidifies its presence in the region.”China Claims Diplomatic Coup Over Taiwan With Solomon SwitchThat footprint is a growing concern for the U.S. and its close ally Australia. Diplomats in Washington and Canberra fear that China’s end-game in the Pacific Islands may be to establish a naval base that would greatly enhance its military reach toward the Americas.China said it “highly” appreciated and supported Kiribati’s decision, and that the move would bring “unprecedented opportunities” to the country. “In the past few days the Solomon Islands and Kiribati, both Pacific island countries, have decided to recognize the ‘one-China’ principle, sever ties with Taiwan and resume or establish relations with China. It is further testament that the ‘one-China’ principle is the overriding trend recognized by all,” foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang told reporters in Beijing. “Relations between China and Pacific island countries are enjoying rapid development,” he said. Luring AlliesWhile Beijing and U.S.-backed Taipei have competed for diplomatic recognition since 1949, the battle has intensified in recent years. Since Tsai was elected in January 2016, China has lured away a third of her 22 allies.“China’s main goal is to squeeze Taiwan’s space in the international arena,” Taiwan Minister of Foreign Affairs Joseph Wu told a briefing on Friday. “The ultimate goal is to wipe out Taiwan’s sovereignty all together.”El Salvador cut ties with Taipei last August, months after Burkina Faso and the Dominican Republic switched recognition to Beijing. This week’s defection of the Solomon Islands is perhaps the most important flip, as it means China has reduced Taiwan’s formal diplomatic footprint by almost half in terms of population and economic output since Tsai came to power.China has gained an advantage in the region by funding and building much-desired transport and utility infrastructure, compared with the focus by U.S. and Australia on bolstering governance, health and education services. Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison is expected to discuss Beijing’s growing sway in the South Pacific during face-to-face talks with President Donald Trump in Washington on Friday.China’s Pacific Ambitions Loom Over Trump Talks With Aussie PMThe U.S. recently established a Directorate of Pacific Affairs within the White House National Security Council, which provides a hub for coordinating U.S. policy in the region with other like-minded countries, including Australia. Australia unveiled a A$ 2 billion ($ 1.4 billion) infrastructure fund for the region last last year, while the U.S. joined a group that includes Japan, the European Union and the Asian Development Bank to fund projects.“These changes are designed to focus inter-agency and international policy on the challenges posed by China’s growing strategic footprint and influence in the South Pacific,” said Ashley Townshend, director of the foreign policy and defense program at the University of Sydney’s United States Studies Centre. “Australia and the U.S. have, until recently, been asleep at the wheel when it comes to what’s been happening in the region.”Too Late?Whether such tactics come too little, too late to halt China’s rising power in the region remains to be seen. Of the four remaining Pacific Islands nations that recognize Taipei, two remain particularly vulnerable to Beijing’s overtures, according to Pryke from the Lowy Institute.“Nauru and Tuvalu are very small and have had recent leadership changes, so China could sense they are vulnerable to pressure and could be the next to flip from Taiwan,” he said. “Palau and Marshall Islands have deep, significant relationships with the U.S., and it’s hard to see them swapping even if they wanted to.”Australia Boosts Pacific Spending as China Widens FootholdThe leaders of Palau and Marshall Islands held security talks with Secretary of State Michael Pompeo last month when he visited Micronesia, a display designed to show that the U.S. hasn’t taken its eye off the region that it forged ties with in the heat of World War II.Taiwan said Friday it had no problem with the four other Pacific allies. But it routinely has said the same thing about other nations just before they end up recognizing China, like Solomon Islands and Kiribati this week.“Losing two diplomatic relationships in one week is a major blow for Taiwan,” said Bates Gill, professor of Asia-Pacific security studies at Australia’s Macquarie University. “And it’s a bit of coup for Beijing, which has been working pretty hard in the last five years to cultivate the remaining countries that continue to have relationships with Taiwan. It’s a big win for Beijing and a tough loss for Taipei.”(Adds China foreign ministry comment from sixth paragraph.)\–With assistance from Iain Marlow, Samson Ellis and April Ma.To contact the reporter on this story: Jason Scott in Canberra at jscott14@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Ruth Pollard at rpollard2@bloomberg.net, Daniel Ten Kate, Karen LeighFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.



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Russia's ruling party loses a third of seats in Moscow election after protests

Russia's ruling party loses a third of seats in Moscow election after protestsRussia’s ruling United Russia party, which supports President Vladimir Putin, has lost one third of its seats in the Moscow city assembly, final polling data cited by Russian news agencies showed on Monday, in an awkward setback for the Kremlin. The outcome of the local elections was closely watched in Moscow after the exclusion of many opposition candidates triggered the biggest protests there in nearly a decade.



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Jeffrey Epstein Pal Maxwell Loses Last-Ditch Attempt to Seal Papers

Jeffrey Epstein Pal Maxwell Loses Last-Ditch Attempt to Seal Papers(Bloomberg) — A federal appeals court unsealed hundreds of pages of long-awaited documents from a defamation lawsuit against one of Jeffrey Epstein’s closest friends, revealing details about claims that the money manager and his associates sexually abused underage girls.The appeals court in Manhattan on Friday denied a last-ditch request by British socialite Ghislaine Maxwell, who was close to Epstein for years, to reconsider an order to make documents public from the suit filed against her in 2015 by an alleged victim, Virginia Giuffre.Not all the documents were unsealed. The appeals panel made public more than a dozen filings related to Maxwell’s failed motion for summary judgment in the case, but the panel ordered a lower court judge to analyze subsets of other documents before making them public.Giuffre has claimed Epstein sexually abused her for two years starting in 2000, when she was 16. Giuffre alleges that Maxwell recruited her while she was working at Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida, and that the socialite participated in the abuse.In her suit, Giuffre claimed that Maxwell, daughter of the late British publisher Robert Maxwell, defamed her by publicly calling her a liar.Numerous documents stemming from the case are already public, including documents with allegations against well-known people.Maxwell had argued the documents should be kept under seal because of the shocking nature of the allegations, including Giuffre’s previously reported claim that Epstein and Maxwell forced her to have sex with the U.K.’s Prince Andrew while she was a minor. The allegations were first reported in a British tabloid several years before the lawsuit was filed.The case attracted public attention last month when a federal appeals court ordered U.S. District Judge Loretta Preska to unseal 2,000 pages of documents that may identify other people described in court filings as “prominent individuals” connected to the case.Epstein, a convicted sex offender who served 13 months in jail a decade ago after pleading guilty to soliciting a minor, was arrested in early July and charged with sexually assaulting teenage girls from 2002 to 2005. He has pleaded not guilty.Maxwell has long denied she was involved with Epstein’s alleged sexual abuse of underage girls. Last month, her lawyers told the appeals court that the media’s “furious feeding frenzy” justified keeping the documents sealed and she asked for a rehearing by a full panel of the appeals court.Read More: Epstein’s Socialite Pal Maxwell Seeks to Keep Files SealedGiuffre also sued Epstein’s lawyer, Harvard law professor Alan Dershowitz, accusing him of defaming her by calling her a liar and denying her claims that he also sexually abused her. Dershowitz denies that he defamed her and says he was defending himself against her allegations.The documents were filed in connection with a summary judgment motion in Giuffre’s case, which was eventually settled. They could provide new information about Epstein’s alleged trafficking ring. Prosecutors say it involved dozens of girls, some as young as 14.Giuffre first accused Epstein in December 2014 when she attempted to join a civil suit filed by two of the money manager’s alleged victims who sought to nullify a federal non-prosecution agreement he struck as part of a guilty plea to lesser state charges.In her request to join the suit, Giuffre included descriptions of abuse by Epstein and other individuals, “including numerous prominent American politicians, powerful business executives, foreign presidents, a well-known Prime Minister, and other world leaders,” the appeals court said in its July 3 ruling.(Updates with details about nature of unsealed documents.)To contact the reporter on this story: Erik Larson in New York at elarson4@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: David Glovin at dglovin@bloomberg.net, Jeffrey D Grocott, Peter BlumbergFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.



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With Collusion Collapse, Public Loses Interest in Mueller Theatrics

With Collusion Collapse, Public Loses Interest in Mueller TheatricsDear Sir, The public does not care.If the Trump Justice Department were to write a letter in response to House Intelligence Committee chairman Adam Schiff’s Tuesday night tirade, that’s what it would say.Well, okay, not exactly. I’m sure there’d be the obligatory “with due respect” throat clearing and whatever else decorum demands when camouflaging a flip of the middle finger. Make no mistake, though: The bird has been flipped.The night before former special counsel Robert Mueller’s much anticipated (and certain to be disappointing) appearance before two congressional committees, Chairman Schiff fired off a letter to protest limitations the Justice Department, at Mueller’s request, has imposed on his testimony.In essence, DOJ has ordered Mueller not to provide testimony outside the four corners of his report. This suits Mueller just fine since he does not want to testify at all. He made that clear in his May 29 press statement, attempting to foreclose a possible subpoena by insisting that he would have nothing to add to the two-volume, 448-page tome.Further, he gave Democrats what, from their perspective, is the best spin that could be put on the obstruction aspect of his probe: He had not “exonerated” the president, even though he neither found crimes, nor even considered whether crimes had occurred — the prosecutor’s peculiar interpretation of Justice Department guidance that forbids indictment of a sitting president.He was trying to tell them: This is as good as it gets. I am not going to say I would have indicted him if not for the guidance.But Democrats cannot leave well enough alone. They hope against hope that Mueller will break down — that Schiff, a former prosecutor, will have a Perry Mason moment, in which Mueller throws up his hands and confesses that, yes, if he could, he would throw the book at Trump.But it’s not going to happen. Mueller cannot give Democrats what they want because doing so would contradict his report. He’s not going to do that. He wanted a Justice Department directive that he not address matters outside the report so he could try to persuade Democrats not to bother asking him to explain his reasoning. Of course, they are going to ask him anyway, but he’s not going to tell them what they want to hear.In ordering Mueller to stick to the report, Justice relied on its usual rationales for denying information to Congress. This is a stew of privileges claimed to shield investigations, the deliberative process over investigative judgments, communications within the executive branch, communications with lawyers, and so on.Of course, Congress does not need to accept the executive’s privilege claims. The Justice Department is a creature of statute. It depends on Congress for its existence, funding, and lawful authority. Congress has the power to conduct oversight. If the administration does not cooperate, the Constitution gives lawmakers an array of weapons to attempt to induce compliance — control over the executive’s budget, public hearings to embarrass executive officials, contempt, censure, even impeachment.That is what Schiff’s letter to Mueller is meant to threaten. The chairman is making it clear that Congress is not bound by the executive’s claims of privilege.He has a problem, though. Disputes between the political branches are, well, political. Congress’s arsenal of powers to check executive departments is political. And to be a meaningful weapon, political power needs public support.The public was very interested in Mueller’s investigation because, for over two years, Democrats and their media collaborators assured the country that the president was complicit in a corrupt conspiracy with the Kremlin to undermine the 2016 campaign, hack Democratic email accounts, and steal the election.Once Mueller concluded that there was no “collusion” scheme, however, public interest ebbed. After finally being told that the narrative of a traitorous president in a corrupt pact with a hostile foreign power was just a political narrative, Americans were not inclined to hop aboard the Democrats’ new and improved obstruction narrative.This is not to say the conduct outlined in the obstruction volume of Mueller’s report is admirable. Some of it is disturbing. It is understandable that Democrats would want the public to focus on it. But it does not rise to the level of a prosecutable obstruction case and it did not, in any event, present to the slightest impediment to Mueller’s completion of the investigation — with which the president cooperated extensively, for all his ranting and raving about a “witch hunt.”Equivocal proof of obstruction in an investigation that was not actually impeded, into a crime that did not actually happen, is not going to grab the public’s interest – not after the collusion let down, not after Democrats and the media have convinced the country that their rabid opposition to Trump is transparently political, and not when the country is dealing with other more pressing matters and the 2020 election is looming.America has moved on. Democrats are at the point where continuing to press the Mueller probe hurts them more than it hurts the president.So Chairman Schiff and Democrats on his Intelligence Committee, and on chairman Jerry Nadler’s Judiciary Committee, which will get the first shot at Mueller today, can rattle their sabers and threaten all sorts of sanctions. But they are not going to hold Mueller in contempt, much less impeach the president. They don’t have the public support to follow through, and they know it.Robert Mueller will stick to his report today. Democrats — and Republicans, who have lots of questions about alleged investigative abuses — will not like being stonewalled. But stonewalled they will be.We’re going through the motions. Loudly, sure, but still just going through the motions.



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Compton boy loses arm after neighbor hands him firework on 10th birthday

Compton boy loses arm after neighbor hands him firework on 10th birthdayA man is in custody after handing his young neighbor a firework that blew up, causing the boy to lose his arm on his 10th birthday.



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Climate change forum loses sponsor after dispute over story

Climate change forum loses sponsor after dispute over storyA planned forum on climate change for Democratic presidential candidates lost several major sponsors on Saturday in the wake of the left-leaning magazine The New Republic publishing — and later retracting — a vulgar and homophobic story related to gay presidential contender Pete Buttigieg. The New Republic was slated as a chief sponsor of a September event designed to spark climate change discussion among candidates during a U.N. climate summit. The magazine pulled down what it called “an opinion piece” about Buttigieg soon after its publication on Friday, citing “criticism of the piece’s inappropriate and invasive content.” But The New Republic as well as three top sponsors bowed out of the climate change event.



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