Tag Archives: landing

Cockpit coffee spill forces commercial jet to make emergency landing

Cockpit coffee spill forces commercial jet to make emergency landingA commercial flight with 326 people on board was forced to make an emergency landing when hot coffee was accidentally spilled over the cockpit control panel over the Atlantic ocean, according to a report on Thursday. With the hot liquid causing a strong electrical burning smell and smoke rising from the panel, the captain decided to divert, the report from the Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) said. The AAIB did not identify the airline but said it had since changed procedures to ensure that cup lids are provided for flights on all routes, and that crews are reminded of the need to use them.



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Australian man makes 'amazing' solo landing during first flying lesson

Australian man makes 'amazing' solo landing during first flying lessonAn Australian man venturing into the skies for a first flying lesson has been forced to make an "amazing" solo landing after his instructor blacked out mid-flight. Max Sylvester's wife and three kids watched from the ground as air traffic control talked him through safely landing the Cessna two-seater at Perth's Jandakot airport on Saturday. The 30-something had issued a panicked mayday call from an altitude of 1,900 metres (6,200 feet), after his instructor slumped onto his shoulder and could not be woken. "Do you know how to operate the aeroplane," the air traffic controller in Perth asked urgently, according to a recording of their exchange. "This is my first lesson," Mr Sylvester responded, adding that he had never landed an aircraft before. Realising the enormity of the task at hand, the tower responded: "The first thing that we are going to do is make sure that the wings stay level." He was instructed to maintain altitude and to make a pass above the runway to get a sense of the terrain and become more at ease. First-time pilot Max Sylvester managed to land the plane on his first lesson  Credit: Instagram "You're doing a really great job," the operator reassures the trainee as someone more familiar with the aircraft was rushed to the tower. "I know this is really stressful. But you're going to do an amazing job and we're going to help you get down to the ground, OK?" Some 20 minutes later, the plane made a heart-stoppingly bumpy landing. "You did it mate!" exclaimed the air traffic controller. "Well done. That's amazing!" The instructor was taken to hospital in a stable condition and Sylvester received his first solo flight certificate from the instructor's employer, Air Australia International. "This could have gone way, way bad," Air Australia International owner Chuck McElwee said, according to public broadcaster ABC. "But everything worked out right, and it worked right, mostly because of the cooperation of the tower."



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A flight from the UK to Portugal was forced to make an emergency landing after the pilot reportedly fainted

A flight from the UK to Portugal was forced to make an emergency landing after the pilot reportedly faintedA Jet2 plane from Manchester, England, to Madeira, Portugal, diverted to Porto. The First Officer landed the plane, and an off-duty pilot helped.



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Migrants in limbo again after landing in Italy

Migrants in limbo again after landing in ItalyDozens of migrants who disembarked on Italy’s Lampedusa island were again in limbo Wednesday as a European deal to redistribute them failed to materialise and Madrid said it could hit the Spanish charity with a huge fine for rescuing them. The prospect of a penalty comes after a protracted standoff between the Spanish NGO Proactiva Open Arms and Italy’s far-right Interior Minister Matteo Salvini finally came to an end. The boat spent six days anchored off Lampedusa before a local prosecutor ordered that the migrants be allowed to land and the vessel temporarily seized amid a probe of Salvini for banning their entry to port.



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Original moon landing tapes fetch $1.82 million at New York auction

Original moon landing tapes fetch $  1.82 million at New York auctionOriginal videotapes of the Apollo 11 moon landing which a NASA intern bought for $ 217.77 (£174.14) were sold for $ 1.82 million at a Sotheby's auction in New York on Saturday. They were bought by Gary George at a government surplus auction in 1976. Lasting two hours and 24 minutes, the tapes are far sharper than those seen around the world at the time of the moon landing on July 20 1969. The footage broadcast across the globe lost quality by the time they were seen on television sets, because of being transmitted via microwave towers, Ticker tape welcome for Apollo 11 astronauts in New York Credit: NASA/Reuters These tapes remained in-house. They represent the "earliest, sharpest, and most accurate surviving video images of man's first steps on the moon," Sotheby's said. They show the entire moonwalk as it was seen by Mission Control staff in Houston, as well as Neil Armstrong's phone call with US president Richard Nixon. The tapes were recorded on a Westinghouse camera NASA had commissioned to send the footage back to earth. Placed in a shock-proof insulated mount, the camera captured Armstrong's descent onto the lunar surface, before being placed on a tripod. Mr George was an engineering student at Lamar University in Texas as well as an intern at the NASA Johnson Space Centre in Houston. He bought around 1,500 reels of magnetic tape and gave most away, apart from three which his father noticed were labelled "APOLLO 11 EVA | July 20, 1969 REEL 1. Mr George gave the reels little attention until 2008 when he heard that NASA was trying to locate the original tapes. The purchaser of the tapes was not disclosed by Sotheby's.



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The Orion capsule for NASA's next moon landing is ready to rock

The Orion capsule for NASA's next moon landing is ready to rockThe next trip to the moon isn't supposed to happen until 2024, but NASA is now ready to put living humans on the surface.On July 20, the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, NASA confirmed that work on the Orion crew vehicle is complete. The reusable capsule, designed to carry four to six astronauts, is meant to offer a "sustainable" option for carrying humans to other worlds, including the moon and, later, Mars.NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine called the new development "an opportunity to take a giant leap forward for all of humanity." The Orion capsule is supposed to carry humans to the moon in 2024 as part of the larger Artemis program.Orion's first trip to space is planned for 2020/2021, and it's to be an uncrewed test flight in which the module will spend 10 days in orbit around the moon before returning to Earth. The Artemis 2 mission is expected to follow in 2022, this time bringing live astronauts out into space for a moon flyby.The 2024 mission will include an actual, crewed landing, with the module first visiting to to-be-built Lunar Orbital Platform – Gateway, a space station that's meant to remain in lunar orbit and serve as a staging ground for communications, scientific research, habitation, and exploration. NASA hopes that by 2028, humans will have a sustainable presence on the surface of the moon.SEE ALSO: Where are the lost Apollo 11 Moon landing tapes?Also completed is Orion's European Service Module, which will power the capsule and propel it through space. The ESM is a contribution of the European Space Agency.With the announcement of Orion's completion, all eyes are on the upcoming moon missions. But the capsule has a bigger future than that. Not only is it meant to eventually carry astronauts to Mars, it's also, according to NASA, the "backbone for [our] deep space exploration" in general. WATCH: Before Apollo 11, we almost went to the moon with the Russians



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NASA imagines a 1969 webpage for the Apollo 11 landing

NASA imagines a 1969 webpage for the Apollo 11 landingOn July 20, 1969, Apollo 11 touched down on the surface of Earth's moon. Now, 50 years later, NASA has imagined what the space mission's website would have looked like.It's a cute tie-in for the U.S. space agency's ongoing 50th anniversary celebration of the moon landing. The "website" is really more of a screenshot mock-up. It doesn't really have 1969 internet vibes because there was no internet in 1969. But it does look like an old-ass landing page from the World Wide Web.Here, see for yourself:Image: NASA / Gary DainesThere was, of course, an online world before websites like the one imagined above existed. I'm calling back to the era of services like Prodigy, America Online, and CompuServe, and to the Bulletin Board Systems that inspired those services.SEE ALSO: Where are the lost Apollo 11 Moon landing tapes?But this is, as NASA describes it, nothing more than "a little thought experiment." An imagining of what the agency's information-providing homepage might have looked like, "with a style that reflected the changing artistic (and other) standards of the day." WATCH: Before Apollo 11, we almost went to the moon with the Russians



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Plane clips car during emergency landing on Reagan Memorial Tollway

Plane clips car during emergency landing on Reagan Memorial TollwayA small plane crashed onto the Reagan Memorial Tollway on Monday afternoon.



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Emergency landing by United flight briefly closes Newark Airport

Emergency landing by United flight briefly closes Newark AirportFlight 2098 took off from New York City’s LaGuardia Airport bound for Houston and a short time later experienced hydraulic problems, prompting the emergency landing, Scott Ladd, a spokesman for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, said in an email.



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Elon Musk says he knows why Falcon Heavy’s core booster missed its landing

Elon Musk says he knows why Falcon Heavy’s core booster missed its landingSpaceX launched its Falcon Heavy rocket in the early hours of Tuesday morning, delivering 24 satellites into orbit and making many of its clients very happy in the process. The company nailed the landing of both side boosters, but the center core booster narrowly missed its landing and splashed down in the ocean instead.In the hours following the launch, SpaceX boss Elon Musk weighed in on the unfortunate fate of the core booster, offering a bit of an explanation as to why it missed its mark.In a response to a question on Twitter, Musk explained that the booster was likely damaged early in its descent back to Earth, and that this damage ultimately caused a failure and prevented the booster from being able to control itself enough to make a safe landing.https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1143690145255841797If the booster was indeed damaged as it began to head back towards Earth, it's actually rather impressive that it managed to make it as close to the drone ship as it did. At one point it appeared that it might come down perfectly, only to drift off to the side at the very last moment.SpaceX has now failed to successfully recover the core booster in all three of its Falcon Heavy launches. It's not the end of the world, but securing that component could save the company a lot of cash in the long run and they'd like to be able to pull off the landing consistently.It's hardly a worst-case scenario for SpaceX if it has to spend a few boosters while it perfects its technique, especially since the rockets are consistently delivering their payloads as planned. If nothing else, it's something SpaceX can continue to work on over the next year as it prepares for its next scheduled Falcon Heavy launch in late 2020.



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