Tag Archives: Korean

US, N. Korean negotiators to meet again before 2nd summit

US, N. Korean negotiators to meet again before 2nd summitSEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The top U.S. envoy for North Korea returned from three days of talks in Pyongyang and will meet again with his North Korean counterpart before the second summit between President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Hanoi later this month, the U.S. State Department said.



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South hopeful, wary, but nuke talks crucial for Korean ties

South hopeful, wary, but nuke talks crucial for Korean tiesSEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Koreans, always deeply divided over how best to deal with their often-belligerent northern neighbor, are reacting with both hope and wariness to President Donald Trump's announcement that he will hold a second nuclear disarmament summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.



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U.S. envoy calls for full list of North Korean weapons programs

U.S. envoy calls for full list of North Korean weapons programsIn a speech at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, envoy Stephen Biegun said North Korea would need to declare all its nuclear and missile programs and warned that Washington had “contingencies” if the diplomatic process failed. Biegun, in his most detailed public remarks on his approach to North Korea after five months in his role, said Washington would have to have expert access and monitoring mechanisms of nuclear and missile sites and “ultimately ensure removal or destruction of stockpiles of fissile material, weapons, missiles, launchers and other weapons of mass destruction.” Pyongyang has rejected declaring its weapons programs for decades. Biegun also said that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un committed during an October visit by U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to the dismantlement and destruction of plutonium and uranium enrichment facilities.



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Trump to say when, where he'll hold 2nd North Korean summit

Trump to say when, where he'll hold 2nd North Korean summitWASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Thursday he will likely announce the site and date of a second summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during the State of the Union address on Tuesday.



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Sandra Oh makes history at the 2019 Golden Globes, and she thanks her parents in Korean

Sandra Oh makes history at the 2019 Golden Globes, and she thanks her parents in KoreanShe's the first actor of Asian descent in 39 years to win the category.



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Trump 'looks forward' to meeting Kim Jong-un for a second time after North Korean leader's keynote speech

Trump 'looks forward' to meeting Kim Jong-un for a second time after North Korean leader's keynote speechDonald Trump, the US president, has said he looks forward to a second summit with Kim Jong-un after the North Korean leader said he was ready to meet any time.  "Kim Jong Un says North Korea will not make or test nuclear weapons, or give them to others – & he is ready to meet President Trump anytime," Trump tweeted, citing a PBS News Hour report on Kim's New Year's address early on Tuesday. "I also look forward to meeting with Chairman Kim who realizes so well that North Korea possesses great economic potential!" he said.  Kim had used his annual speech to North Korea to issue a message to Washington that he was willing to meet President Trump to achieve their common goal of denuclearisation but warned he may be forced to take a new path if the US did not lift crippling sanctions against his regime.  “Kim Jong Un says North Korea will not make or test nuclear weapons, or give them to others – & he is ready to meet President Trump anytime.” PBS News Hour. I also look forward to meeting with Chairman Kim who realizes so well that North Korea possesses great economic potential!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 1, 2019 Analysts pointed to the selective nature of Mr Trump’s response as he did not comment on the rest of Kim’s address, which urged the US to take unspecified corresponding measures on nuclear disarmament and not to “misjudge” his patience.  Since the two leaders’ first historic meeting in Singapore in June, talks between the US and North Korea have stalled over differing interpretations of what “denuclearisation of the Korean Peninsula” – a goal set out in their summit agreement – actually means.  “We declared at home and abroad that we would neither make and test nuclear weapons any longer nor use and proliferate them, and we have taken various practical measures,” said Kim in his speech.  Spoiler alert: they are not the same thing. And then there is the other section where Kim refers to “new ways” to defend NK’s sovereignty if the US doesn’t take (pretty broad) corresponding measures. I don’t want to find out what those new ways are. t.co/n5RxIQDAE1— Vipin Narang (@NarangVipin) January 2, 2019 In 2018, North Korea dismantled a nuclear testing ground and suspended nuclear and long-range missile tests, but analysts pointed out that he did not offer any new concessions related to his nuclear weapons arsenal on Tuesday.  They also stressed the conditions that Pyongyang attached to future progress.  Kim’s speech contained the expectation of a response by the US to its “proactive prior efforts” with “trustworthy measures” of its own and “corresponding practical actions.” If Washington did so, “bilateral relations will develop wonderfully at a fast pace through the process of taking more definite and epochal measures,” said the North Korean leader.  Happy New Year! Here's a brief rundown of Kim Jong Un's New Year Address, which you can read in the official English translation here: t.co/05zzOfHhwN— Joshua H. Pollack (@Joshua_Pollack) January 1, 2019 Highlighting the difference between what Kim said and what President Trump thought he said, Vipin Narang, an associate professor of political science at MIT, tweeted: “this is unsustainable for much longer and we are on a collision course.” Joshua Pollack, a senior research associate at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey, California, tweeted that nothing had changed in North Korea’s position.  “The bottom line: Kim remains dug into the same positions on nuclear diplomacy he has occupied over the last six months. He's pressing the South to break ranks with the US. And he's going to have a lot of coal dug to keep the economy humming,” he said.  



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N. Korean leader calls for more talks with South in new year

N. Korean leader calls for more talks with South in new yearSEOUL, South Korea (AP) — North Korean leader Kim Jong Un sent a letter to South Korean President Moon Jae-in on Sunday calling for more peace talks between the leaders in the new year following their active engagement in 2018, South Korea's presidential office said.



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South Korea's Kim Jong-un fan clubs prepare welcome as North Korean leader vows visit to Seoul

South Korea's Kim Jong-un fan clubs prepare welcome as North Korean leader vows visit to SeoulNorth Korean leader Kim Jong-un has written a rare letter to Seoul vowing to “frequently” meet Moon Jae-in, South Korea’s president, to discuss nuclear disarmament.  In the missive, described by South Korean officials as warm in tone, Kim pledged to pursue peace between the two countries and expressed regret that he had been so far unable to visit South Korea after Mr Moon invited him to do so in September.  But he expressed a strong will to visit the South Korean capital in the future and Mr Moon welcomed his overtures via his social media account. “If we meet together with sincerity, there is nothing we cannot achieve,” Mr Moon said. The North Korean leader, long denounced as a dictator in the South, can expect a warm welcome from at least a section of the South Korean population if he arrives. In recent months fan clubs have sprung up to prepare a welcoming party for his visit.  Earlier this month, dozens of South Korean university students in black winter coats sat down on a frozen pathway in Seoul’s Maronie Park to discuss their unlikely new hero. Clutching bunches of pastel pink rosebays, symbolising the sea of flowers that greeted Moon Jae-in, the South Korean president, on his trip to Pyongyang in September, they broke into song. “Let’s make reunification happen a minute sooner,” the students chanted, in a refrain referring to their political goal to see the Korean peninsula unified. The meeting, attended by The Telegraph, was a stark reflection of the perceptional shift taking place in the South. “Until now, we did not know Kim’s true self. We only saw the media portrayal of him as an evil man!” one speaker said.  Such scenes would have been unthinkable in the South Korean capital one year ago. Not only because Pyongyang was still threatening Seoul and Washington with the prospect of war but because the South’s National Security Act was prepped to jail anyone “praising, inciting or propagating the activities of an anti-government organisation.”  South Korean President Moon Jae-in was given a warm welcome in Pyongyang in September Credit: Pool/AP The enforcement of the 1948 law has been relaxed during President Moon’s 18-month-old administration as he pursues a diplomatic détente with Pyongyang to halt its nuclear weapons and missiles programme and bring peace to the peninsula.  The more tolerant political atmosphere has allowed at least a dozen civic groups – collectively known as the ‘Paektu Praise Committee’- to spring up as an unofficial welcoming squad for Kim’s planned visit to Seoul.  Although the confirmation and timing of his unprecedented trip has not yet been nailed down, the groups are already preparing. Some are learning the dance moves of a North Korean art troupe, while others are visiting schools to collect welcome messages.  At the Maronie Park event in mid-December, enthralled students watched a short drama about a local family excited about Kim coming to Seoul. “I like our Chairman Kim more than BTS!” yelled the family’s father, referring to a K-pop band that has stormed the global charts this year.  To one side, a pop-up photo gallery displayed highlights of 2018’s Korean diplomatic calendar – Kim and President Moon’s first meeting on the border in April, holding their hands in the air, smiling with their wives on a group trip to the North’s Mount Paektu.  A student welcome committee organised a pop-up gallery in Seoul of President Moon's meetings with Kim Credit: Junho Lee “I believe the events we hold influence people’s reactions to Kim’s visit. Many people who didn’t really know about Kim’s visit see our event and learn more,” said participant Ha In-cheol, 23. “We do receive many positive reviews. People write postcards saying ‘Welcome to the South’, ‘We hope you visit us soon’. We also sell stickers and badges welcoming Kim and many people buy them,” he said.  In a Telegraph interview, Kim Han-sung, 28, who heads up the ‘Korea Progressive University Student’s Union’, a branch of the praise committee, said the welcoming parties had been inspired in part by President Moon’s warm reception in Pyongyang.  “The people there welcomed him with the Unified Korea flag and flowers. We plan on doing the same thing when Kim comes here. We are also planning for a candlelight cultural festival, campaigns, and street performances to welcome him,” he said.  The groups are practicing songs popular with the North’s Samjiyon orchestra, a traditional music ensemble that performed at the South Korea Winter Olympics earlier this year. The orchestra’s greatest hits include “Let us run towards the future” and “We welcome you”.  Left wing groups in Seoul are taking a positive view of Kim Jong-un Credit: Junho Lee “All these songs are very meaningful in the relationship of the two Koreas,” said Mr Kim.  But he admitted that, despite a generally positive public reaction to their street activities, pro-Pyongyang activists were coming under fire online. “We receive lot of attacks on the internet,” he said.  The rise of left-wing groups promoting positive engagement with Kim Jong-un has also sparked a backlash from conservatives which analysts say could erode public support for Mr Moon. The president’s ratings are already on a downward spiral due to the country’s economic woes.  Meanwhile, defectors who have taken shelter in the South after fleeing hardships and persecution in the pariah regime have also been left aghast at Kim’s sudden surge in popularity after long being portrayed as a ruthless dictator.  At the Teach North Korean Refugees (TNKR) office in Seoul, some said they were baffled by the positive reactions to his planned visit, reported the Korea Times.  “I had a miserable life in North Korea, I was sentenced to one of the harsh prison camps. Later, after I was released, I escaped, but I got captured and sent back. Then my life in that living hell became even worse,” said Eunhwa, a woman who arrived in the South in 2015.  “I'm so surprised to hear South Koreans saying nice things about Kim Jung-un. It means they really don't understand the evil to the north.” Mikyung, a woman who escaped North Korea in 2016 said she was amazed at the South’s high expectations about Kim’s desire for peace. “It should be clear to anyone who understands the regime that it is seeking survival on its own terms, not to compromise,” she said.  “He will continue trying to exert complete control over everyone within North Korean territory and maybe even the entire Korean Peninsula.”        



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North Korean soldier defects to South: South's military

North Korean soldier defects to South: South's militaryA North Korean soldier defected to South Korea on Saturday, the South Korean military said, but there were no unusual movements by North Korea’s military in response. The North Korean soldier was spotted moving toward South Korea, and then crossed over a military demarcation line separating the two sides, the South’s Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) said in a statement. North Korean soldiers have even shot at defecting colleagues, raising fears of a clash.



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North Korea's Deadly Artillery Has the “Potential to Affect Millions of South Korean Citizens”

North Korea's Deadly Artillery Has the “Potential to Affect Millions of South Korean Citizens”About that "ultramodern" weapon from last week: it could have been some fancy new artillery. 



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