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Trump Revamps July 4 With Speech, Fighter Jets, Military Tanks

Trump Revamps July 4 With Speech, Fighter Jets, Military Tanks(Bloomberg) — Fighter jets and military tanks will set the scene for an Independence Day speech by Donald Trump on the National Mall as the president puts himself at the center of a reimagined July 4 celebration.Trump will speak from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on Thursday evening in what’s billed as an apolitical event that comes as the 2020 presidential campaign is heating up. The “Salute to America,” as Trump calls it, will feature flyovers and an expanded fireworks show that will briefly ground commercial flights.“Our July 4th Salute to America at the Lincoln Memorial is looking to be really big. It will be the show of a lifetime!” Trump tweeted Wednesday.But the show won’t go entirely Trump’s way. Forecasts suggest scattered thunderstorms and some aides fear crowds won’t meet the president’s expectations. Meanwhile, protesters have a permit to display an inflatable version of the president that depicts him as a baby in a diaper with small hands. A similar blimp has greeted Trump on trips to London, but the Washington version won’t be allowed to leave the ground.Rebranded CelebrationGates open at 3 p.m. for his event — six hours before fireworks begin — with temperatures expected to reach the low 90s Fahrenheit.Trump is effectively rebranding a celebration that attracts thousands of families to watch the fireworks but almost never includes presidential speeches on the Mall. Critics say his revisions risk turning Washington’s July 4th into a de facto Trump rally that’s likely to draw counter-protests.Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton, a Democrat who represents the District of Columbia in Congress, said Trump’s plans “look like a political event” and predicted a light turnout for his speech.“I think the president is in for another flop, and he’s going to have to explain a flop that he set up,” Norton said. “He’s still smarting from the thin crowds at his inauguration. All I can say is: You ain’t seen nothing yet.”The White House rejected the idea that the celebration would be political. Trump told reporters on Monday that the event will be “about this county and it’s a salute to America.” He said he hoped for a large turnout. Asked if he could give a speech to all Americans, Trump replied: “I think so, I think I’ve reached most Americans.” He went on to criticize Democrats on health care and taxation.Military ParadeTrump conceived the event after his plans for a military parade on Veteran’s Day were stymied by complaints from local officials about the cost. The president has been enamored of the idea of a Washington celebration with a military component since attending the 2017 Bastille Day parade in Paris, which included an aerial display, thousands of marching soldiers and hundreds of military vehicles.Trump’s remarks are expected to last roughly half an hour, an administration official said, speaking on condition of anonymity. His speech will celebrate America’s independence, the flag and the military, the official added.Trump will reserve space for special guests — the Trump campaign and Republican National Committee have received tickets, while the Department of Defense, with 5,000 tickets of its own, will send several top officials, including Acting Defense Secretary Mark Esper.Federal law bars political fundraising in government buildings or rooms where officials perform their duties, but doesn’t restrict presidents from inviting deep-pocketed donors to the White House or official events.The day also includes a parade in the late morning and early afternoon, and a concert at the Capitol.The fireworks generally last about 15 minutes but this year will span 35 minutes after a donation by two pyrotechnic companies valued at $ 750,000. Because of the flyovers, the Federal Aviation Administration will suspend commercial air traffic at Reagan National Airport near Washington for the first time during a July 4th celebration. The FAA said flights would be affected again during the fireworks display.Abrams TanksThe Defense Department said Tuesday that it would provide a pair of M1A2 Abrams tanks and two M2 Bradley Fighting Vehicles for the event. They’ll be delivered on flatbed trucks to avoid damaging streets. Organizers had yet to determine where they’d be placed.There will be several flyovers, including by the Navy’s Blue Angels flight team. The air show will also include Air Force One, a Marine One presidential helicopter, two F-35 fighter jets, two F-22 Raptor, two F/A-18 Hornets, a B2 bomber and four Apache helicopters.The event also is renewing a long-simmering feud with local officials in Washington. The city has said it’s still owed about $ 7 million from costs associated with Trump’s inauguration but the administration official said the District hasn’t asked for funds from upcoming federal budgets.Trump said Wednesday on Twitter that the cost of the event “will be very little compared to what it is worth,” while the administration official earlier declined to say how bill would be covered. Norton said Trump is “doubling up, tripling up on what he owes the District of Columbia.”Presidential RemarksWhile some of Trump’s predecessors have spoken on or around July 4th, they haven’t done it in quite the same way.Barack Obama delivered annual Independence Day remarks from the White House. Ronald Reagan gave a “Star Spangled Salute to America” speech at the Jefferson Memorial, near the Lincoln Memorial, in 1987, but did so on the morning of July 3.Richard Nixon recorded an address that played at the July 4th, 1970, celebrations, which were marked by protests over the Vietnam War. Harry S. Truman spoke at the Washington Monument on July 4, 1951, 175 years after the Continental Congress approved the Declaration of Independence.Not all presidents’ attempts to celebrate July 4 have gone smoothly. In 1845, President James K. Polk hosted fireworks at the White House. With thousands of people gathered to watch, some of the rockets were accidentally fired into the crowd. At least one person was killed.(Updates with Trump tweet, weather and crowds starting in third paragraph.)\–With assistance from Margaret Talev, Bill Allison and Tony Capaccio.To contact the reporters on this story: Josh Wingrove in Washington at jwingrove4@bloomberg.net;Jennifer Jacobs in Washington at jjacobs68@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Michael Shepard at mshepard7@bloomberg.net, Joshua Gallu, Justin BlumFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.



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Birds at border prompt S. Korea to launch jets, issue alert

Birds at border prompt S. Korea to launch jets, issue alertEnding a brief media frenzy, South Korea's military said it turned out to be a flock of birds that prompted it to launch fighter jets and alert journalists that it had detected an unidentified object flying near the border with North Korea on Monday. The South's earlier announcement on the flying object left many media outlets scrambling, with the incident coming a day after U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un met at a different portion of the heavily fortified Korean border. South Korea's military has been under fire for a possible security gap after a boat carrying four North Koreans arrived undetected recently at a South Korean port.



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Top 20: Best Submarines, Aircraft Carriers, Bombers and Fighter Jets Ever

Top 20: Best Submarines, Aircraft Carriers, Bombers and Fighter Jets EverOver the last century, nations have invested tremendous resources in bomber aircraft. In today's world, where everyday it seems a new piece of military technology is poised to take over the battlefield and make everything else obsolete, there are several weapons of war that seem to have some staying power. Aircraft carriers, while some may consider them obsolete, remain one of the ultimate ways to display national power and prestige, with the unique capability to attack targets from the world's seas with deadly accuracy.Submarines have many uses. Whether it is to exercise sea control, deter an enemy with underwater nuclear weapons or ensure you have the ability to strike with various types of conventional weapons like cruise missiles on land, subs seem to be only gaining in prominence. This first appeared in November 2017.Then there is the bomber. Some are old, like the B-52. Some are just getting started, like the B-21 Raider. Some we don't know much about, like Russia's PAK-FA. Yet, one thing is clear: Bombers can still make or break any conflict that could occur now or in the future. And fighter jets are not going anywhere. The F-35 is the ultimate example–considering the massive cost–of this important military asset having clear staying power (the only debate at this point is whether it will be manned or unmanned).



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Air Canada says its 737 MAX jets grounded until at least August

Air Canada says its 737 MAX jets grounded until at least AugustAir Canada said Thursday that its fleet of Boeing 737 MAX jets will remain grounded until at least August 1, pushing back a previous estimate for their return to service. Two Boeing 737 MAX aircraft — one operated by Ethiopian Airlines and another by Lion Air — have crashed in recent months, killing nearly 350 people. Air Canada’s 24 MAX jetliners were grounded in March following the second crash.



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Removing Turkey from F-35 jet's supply chain could slow work on 75 jets: Navy officer

Removing Turkey from F-35 jet's supply chain could slow work on 75 jets: Navy officerIf Turkey were removed from the F-35 jet supply chain amid a dispute with the United States over its planned purchase of a Russian missile system, it would impact the production rate for up to 75 of the fighters, a Pentagon official said on Thursday. The United States has halted delivery of equipment related to the stealthy fighter aircraft to Turkey. It was the first concrete American step to block delivery of the jet to the NATO ally in light of the planned purchase of Russia’s S-400 missile defense system.



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Crashed Boeing jets lacked two safety features that would have cost extra

Crashed Boeing jets lacked two safety features that would have cost extraTwo Boeing jets that crashed in Ethiopia and Indonesia each lacked a pair of cockpit safety features that the plane manufacturer charged extra for. The systems  might have helped the pilots as they struggled to control their planes, aviation experts said. Lion Air Flight 610 crashed in October killing 189 people, and Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 went down on March 10, shortly after takeoff from Addis Ababa, with the loss of 157 lives. Both Boeing 737 Max aircraft were new but did not have an angle of attack indicator, which shows how much the nose is tilted. They also did not have an angle of attack disagree light, which is triggered if other sensors are giving conflicting information, the New York Times reported. Such safety features were not required on new planes by the US Federal Aviation Administration, and Boeing charged a fee to have them put in if an airline requested them. Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines had opted not to. Boeing has now announced the angle of attack disagree light will be free on new 737 Max planes. Ethiopia Airlines crash Bjorn Fehrm, an aviation analyst, told the New York Times: "They're critical and cost almost nothing for the airlines to install. Boeing charges for them because it can. But they're vital for safety." The various extra customised features offered by plane manufacturers can be expensive, with airlines paying hundreds of thousands of dollars for them. Many low-cost airlines opt not to do so if regulators have not made them mandatory. Airlines with Boeing 737 Max 8s in their fleet The US Justice Department has reportedly issued a number of subpoenas as part of an investigation, which is in its early stages, looking at Boeing's safety procedures. In a statement Ethiopian Airlines said its pilots went through all the extra training required by Boeing and the FAA to fly the 737 Max. As investigators look into the crashes attention has turned to a new software in the planes that can push the nose down in some circumstances, for example when the sensors suggest the plane may be stalling. The FAA has said satellite-based tracking data showed the movements of both flights were similar before they crashed. It has emerged that the Lion Air pilots frantically scrambled through a handbook to understand why the jet was lurching downwards.



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Regulators challenge Boeing to prove its Max jets are safe

Regulators challenge Boeing to prove its Max jets are safeAviation regulators worldwide laid down a stark challenge for Boeing to prove that its grounded 737 Max jets are safe to fly amid suspicions that faulty software might have contributed to two crashes that killed 346 people in less than six months.



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Will the US ground Boeing 737 Max 8 jets? Questions following Ethiopian Airlines crash left unanswered

Will the US ground Boeing 737 Max 8 jets? Questions following Ethiopian Airlines crash left unansweredTwo days after an Ethiopian Airlines flight plowed into the ground, killing all 157 people aboard, investigators are still searching for answers.



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Criticism of FAA mounts as other nations ground Boeing jets

Criticism of FAA mounts as other nations ground Boeing jetsWASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration is facing mounting criticism for backing the airworthiness of Boeing's 737 Max jets as the number of countries that have grounded the aircraft grows in the wake of the Ethiopian Airlines crash over the weekend.



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All Boeing Max 8 And 9 Jets Were Just Suspended From Flying in the United States

All Boeing Max 8 And 9 Jets Were Just Suspended From Flying in the United StatesIn the wake of two deadly plane crashes, the U.S. finally follows the lead of other countries' aviation administrations in grounding the plane.



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