Tag Archives: Iowa

Heading Into Iowa, Biden and Sanders Top Latest National Poll

Heading Into Iowa, Biden and Sanders Top Latest National Poll(Bloomberg) — Former Vice President Joe Biden is holding his lead in national polling just days ahead of the Iowa caucuses, but Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders is keeping the gap narrow.Biden takes the top spot in the latest Quinnipiac University national poll with 26% support among Democrats and Democratic-leaning voters, up slightly from 25% in a Jan. 13 survey. Sanders rose to 21% in the latest tally, up from 19% two weeks ago and his highest tally so far in the poll. The new survey was taken between Jan. 22 to Jan. 27.“Biden’s support is holding steady — but he no longer sits comfortably at the top of the Democratic presidential pack,” said Quinnipiac analyst Mary Snow.Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren was in third at 15%, and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who’s spent $ 278 million on advertising since joining the race in November, placed fourth with 8%. The former mayor of New York is the founder and majority owner of Bloomberg LP, the parent company of Bloomberg News.Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar had 7% support, former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg had 6% and entrepreneur Andrew Yang had 3%. No other candidate got more than 1%. The sample of 827 Democratic-leaning registered voters nationwide had a margin of error of 3.4 percentage points.National polls aren’t particularly predictive of the eventual nominee at this point. But winning in the early states is critical to generate momentum to continue on through Super Tuesday on March 3, when populous states including California and Texas hold their primaries.This post is part of Campaign Update, our live coverage from the 2020 campaign trail.To contact the author of this story: Bill Allison in Washington at ballison14@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Wendy Benjaminson at wbenjaminson@bloomberg.net, Jon MorganElizabeth WassermanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.



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Biden's final Iowa drive sweeps through rival territory

Biden's final Iowa drive sweeps through rival territoryWhen U.S. presidential candidate Joe Biden went to an Iowa university to campaign this week, one thing was in short supply: students who support him. Biden, 77, joked that it can be difficult to get college students to show up before 4 p.m. and, indeed, a few more young people appeared at a later campaign event at the University of Iowa. “I’m the only one that gets a significant portion of the young vote, as well as the old vote, in-between vote, black vote, Hispanic vote, all the vote,” Biden said.



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With clock ticking, Democratic White House hopefuls sprint through Iowa during impeachment break

With clock ticking, Democratic White House hopefuls sprint through Iowa during impeachment breakThe leading three Democratic U.S. senators running for president barnstormed across Iowa this weekend, seeking to maximize a frenzied 36 hours before returning to Washington to resume duties as jurors in President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial. With barely a week to go before Iowans gather in caucuses to deliver the first verdict of the Democratic presidential race, Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and Amy Klobuchar flew to the state immediately after Saturday’s trial session ended early, hoping to gain ground in what has been an unsettled contest. The latest state polls have shown either Sanders or former Vice President Joe Biden in the lead, with Warren and former South Bend, Indiana, mayor Pete Buttigieg, close behind.



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Biden Leads USA Today/Suffolk Iowa Poll; Sanders, Buttigieg Next

Biden Leads USA Today/Suffolk Iowa Poll; Sanders, Buttigieg Next(Bloomberg) — Joe Biden leads the Democratic field in Iowa, according to a USA Today/Suffolk poll, with 25% support. Bernie Sanders was second at 19%, followed by Pete Buttigieg in third at 18%.It’s a better result for the former vice president than an NYT/Siena survey out Saturday, which showed Sanders in first and Biden trailing Buttigieg in third place. Elizabeth Warren was fourth and Amy Klobuchar fifth in both polls.Yet taken together, both surveys show a fluid Democratic field a week before Iowa caucuses. RealClearPolitics, aggregating recent surveys in Iowa, showed Biden and Sanders essentially tied ahead of the USA Today survey’s release.Under Iowa’s unique caucus system, voters’ backup plans could be decisive. If a candidate doesn’t reach 15% support in a local area, they aren’t considered viable, their votes won’t tally and supporters are encouraged to pick someone else.Yet there’s no clear indication where the supporters of lesser-polling candidates might wind up. Three quarters of those supporting a candidate outside the top five were undecided about their next choice.The USA Today/Suffolk poll surveyed 500 likely Democratic caucusgoers from Jan. 23-26, with an error margin plus or minus 4.4 percentage points.To contact the reporter on this story: Derek Wallbank in Singapore at dwallbank@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Chua Baizhen at bchua14@bloomberg.net, Steve GeimannFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.



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AOC and Michael Moore urge Iowa voters not to 'play it safe' as they stand in for Sanders

AOC and Michael Moore urge Iowa voters not to 'play it safe' as they stand in for SandersTwo of Bernie Sanders’s highest-profile allies, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., and liberal documentary filmmaker Michael Moore, filled in for him on the campaign trail Friday night, speaking to a rally here at the University of Iowa, as the Vermont senator participated in the impeachment trial in Washington, D.C. 



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Elizabeth Warren clashes with Iowa father who calls her student loan policy unfair

Elizabeth Warren clashes with Iowa father who calls her student loan policy unfairElizabeth Warren was confronted by an angry father at a campaign event in Iowa by an angry father who took issue with her plan to forgive student loan debts.Arguing that those who paid for college tuition themselves would be “screwed” by her proposal, he confronted the Democratic senator on Monday at a presidential campaign town hall in Grimes, Iowa.



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Biden Tops Iowa Poll by Democratic Rural Group: Campaign Update

Biden Tops Iowa Poll by Democratic Rural Group: Campaign Update(Bloomberg) — A new Iowa poll has Joe Biden leading the Democratic presidential race in the first caucus state. The former vice president also placed as likely caucusgoers’ top second choice, putting him in a strong position with just two weeks to go until voters begin to choose their nominee.Biden had the support of 24% of likely caucus-goers polled by Focus on Rural America, an Iowa group with Democratic ties that has been polling in the state since last year. Biden’s backing in the survey has been roughly stable since the group’s September poll, when he was at 25%. He is also the second choice of 24% of those surveyed, an important measure given that caucusgoers have the chance to choose a second candidate if their first choice gets below 15% at their caucus site on Feb. 3.Elizabeth Warren was in second place at 19%, a 4-point drop from her showing in the previous poll. Pete Buttigieg was in third place at 16% and Bernie Sanders was in fourth at 12%. Amy Klobuchar, who’s staking her campaign on success in Iowa, was in fifth place at 11%. Buttigieg was the second most-popular second-choice candidate, with 21% of likely caucus-goers saying they’d support him if their first choice is not viable.The poll’s ordering of the top four candidates is different than the well-regarded Des Moines Register poll released 10 days ago, which had Sanders leading and Biden in fourth. The discrepancies probably reflect what’s expected to be a messy caucus night result that few Iowa Democrats are willing to predict.The poll, conducted by David Binder Research, surveyed 500 likely caucusgoers and has an error margin of 4.4 percentage points.COMING UP:Democratic presidential candidates Pete Buttigieg, former mayor of South Bend, Indiana, and Michael Bloomberg, former mayor of New York, both plan to address the U.S. Conference of Mayors on Wednesday.The candidates will debate again in New Hampshire on Feb. 7.The first-in-the-nation Iowa caucuses will be held Feb. 3. The New Hampshire primary is Feb. 11. Nevada holds its caucuses on Feb. 22 and South Carolina has a primary on Feb. 29.(Michael Bloomberg is the founder and majority owner of Bloomberg LP, the parent company of Bloomberg News.)To contact the reporter on this story: Jennifer Epstein in Washington at jepstein32@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Wendy Benjaminson at wbenjaminson@bloomberg.net, Edward DufnerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.



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Biden pulls ahead in new Iowa poll

Biden pulls ahead in new Iowa pollThere's some indication of fallout for Sanders and Warren over their recent spat.



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Sanders-Warren Clash on Women Elevates Acrimony in Iowa Debate

Sanders-Warren Clash on Women Elevates Acrimony in Iowa Debate(Bloomberg) — Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren tried unsuccessfully to calm the waters Tuesday after a spat involving elitism, sexism and insinuations of lying, in a wide-ranging debate where the top candidates each enjoyed strong moments without yielding a clear winner.The clash between the progressives looms over a tight race 20 days before the Iowa caucuses after a recent Des Moines Register/CNN survey showed Sanders, Warren, Joe Biden and Pete Buttigieg bunched up in a five-point spread at the front of the field.It was hard to see how anyone on stage at Drake University in Des Moines dramatically bettered their position heading into the Feb. 3 Iowa caucuses. That’s good news for Sanders, who led one key Iowa poll, and Biden, who topped a second survey. Warren and Buttigieg, struggling to gain altitude in Iowa, held their own with crisp performances while taking some hits from rivals.When moderators raised the Sanders-Warren dispute, the uncomfortable smiles from the two candidates captured the feelings of many progressives who want the two to work together to block a moderate like Biden from winning the nomination.But both held to their contradictory stories about what happened in a private 2018 meeting between them. Sanders insisted he “didn’t say” a woman couldn’t win the presidency in 2020. Warren said she “disagreed” when Sanders told her that, before trying to pivot away by saying, “Bernie is my friend, and I’m not here to fight with Bernie.”Neither of the two wanted to prolong the topic, and yet it framed the early part of the debate and allowed each of the candidates — four men and two women — to lay out their cases to become the nominee. The spat dredged up old hostilities among mainstream Democratic figures who believe Sanders damaged Hillary Clinton in 2016 and potentially cost her the election.The tension between the two was evident afterward when Warren walked up to Sanders to talk, but declined to shake his hand when he offered it.”Bernie should have let this go,” former Clinton 2016 aide Jennifer Palmieri wrote on Twitter. She later added: “What we will likely remember most from this night is @ewarren and her well litigated exchange with @BernieSanders on electability. This is very tricky terrain for women candidates and she came out the winner.”President Donald Trump sought to fuel the divisions as he held a rally in Milwaukee at the same time as the debate. “She said that Bernie said a woman can’t win,” he said. “I don’t believe that Bernie said that. I really don’t. It’s not the kind of a thing he’d say.”And Warren tried to seize the moment to make her case to lead a majority-female party.“Look at the men on this stage — collectively they have lost 10 elections. The only people on this stage who have won every election they’ve run in are the women,” she said, drawing heavy applause and referring to herself and Senator Amy Klobuchar. Tom Steyer completed the six-person debate stage.The spat caused Sanders supporters to light up Twitter this week with the anti-Warren hashtags RefundWarren and ITrustBernie. It was clear Tuesday those animosities would linger.“Who does Warren think she will win over with this sexism attack on Sanders? I can promise you she has just rendered herself completely unacceptable to most Sanders supporters,” progressive commentator Krystal Ball tweeted during the debate.Other Democrats had a different view.“It’s not just about what may or may not have been said in this conversation. Bernie came into this race with a bit of a legacy — the Bernie Bros were known to have been horrible to women online,” Karen Finney, a former Clinton 2016 aide, said on CNN before the debate Tuesday, using a pejorative to describe Sanders’ most fervent backers.“The Bernie Bros, again — they’re pretty obnoxious. And they’re very sexist and misogynistic,” she said, adding that there are “a lot of women feeling pretty raw from 2016.”Charles Chamberlain, the chair of the liberal group Democracy for America, pleaded with the two to play nice.“Especially given how close the race remains just 20 days ahead of the first contest, it’s critical that progressives focus our fight for the Democratic nomination against candidates supported by the corporate wing, instead of fighting each other,” he said in a statement issued in the middle of the debate.Klobuchar, who desperately needs Iowa to catapult into the top tier, had an unremarkable night as she offered herself as a pragmatic Midwesterner.Michael Bloomberg, who is skipping the early states and polling fifth nationally, didn’t qualify for the debate under Democratic National Committee criteria because the billionaire is self-funding his campaign. He’s the founder and majority owner of Bloomberg LP, the parent company of Bloomberg News.(Adds one paragraph after sixth paragraph about post-debate chat between Sanders and Warren)To contact the reporter on this story: Sahil Kapur in Washington at skapur39@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Wendy Benjaminson at wbenjaminson@bloomberg.net, Larry LiebertFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.



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Klobuchar Is Banking on Iowa Moderates. Her Problem: So Is Buttigieg.

Klobuchar Is Banking on Iowa Moderates. Her Problem: So Is Buttigieg.DIAGONAL, Iowa — Amy Klobuchar was holding two loaves of bread.It was stop five on the second day of her post-debate bus tour, and she was in Diagonal, a tiny town of just more than 300 in the deep southwestern part of the state. A woman known for her fresh bread had brought some loaves as a gift. About two dozen people came to watch Klobuchar accept them. Later, on "Face the Nation," she boasted about getting "record crowds" in small towns.The following day, Pete Buttigieg — in a suit jacket for a change — stepped onto a makeshift stage at a high school gymnasium in Indianola, a city of 16,000 just south of Des Moines. It was his first stop on a two-day swing, and more than 1,000 people had showed up to hear him speak."Some folks on TV are starting to use the word 'front-runner' to describe our standing right here in Iowa," he said, with a touch of swagger.Of all the Democratic presidential candidates still in the race, it has been Klobuchar, the Minnesota senator, and Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, who have worked hardest and deepest to win over Iowa's more moderate Democrats, pitching themselves as Midwestern pragmatists who know how to prevail in red states. Both candidates know they have virtually no path to the nomination without a strong finish in Iowa, and in the six weeks that remain before the Iowa caucuses, it's likely their competition will only intensify.Both Klobuchar and Buttigieg offer messages about restoring unity in America. They speak about their ability to engage independents and Republicans. At campaign events, many attendees say both candidates are in their top tier.Yet if Klobuchar and Buttigieg have become the race's most talked-about moderate alternatives to former Vice President Joe Biden, the last weekend before Christmas was also a pointed study in the meaning of momentum. The race is still fluid in Iowa, but Klobuchar remains in a distant fifth place, behind the top four candidates: Buttigieg, Biden, and Sens. Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren.After an unusually spirited debate in which she took on Buttigieg directly, Klobuchar tried to capitalize on the fresh interest in her campaign with a 27-county bus tour. On Saturday, her events were energy-filled if still intimate, her crowds growing but nowhere near the hundreds that some top-tier candidates can draw to their town halls and rallies: Dozens of Iowans packed into a coffee shop in Creston for Klobuchar. They crowded into a back room in Osceola and sat with her at a local restaurant in Corning.But when a prominent endorser asked the audience in Osceola who had committed to caucus for Klobuchar, almost no one raised their hands."I don't think she closed the deal with me today at all," said Jerry Smith, 67, after the brief event concluded. "It gets right down to electability." He was still deciding between Klobuchar and Biden.His hesitancy underscored what is now Klobuchar's biggest challenge in Iowa: translating curiosity, even traction, into support on caucus night.Her campaign knows time is running out."Everyone always says, 'I like you; you're in my top three,' " Klobuchar said, at stop after stop. "We don't have time for that anymore."Recent polling shows Klobuchar on the rise but not nearly at a fast enough pace to eclipse the top-tier candidates. Polls of Iowa voters have been scarce in recent weeks, but those that exist have consistently shown her in fifth place, and an Iowa State University/Civiqs poll released last week showed her with 4% support.Still, among Iowa Democrats, expectations for Klobuchar have been rising for weeks. Aides see an opportunity for her to pick off moderate voters who are worried about Biden's age and Buttigieg's inexperience. They think she could attract women who want to vote for another woman but are concerned that Warren is too liberal.During her bus tour, she highlighted the endorsements she had received in Iowa, offering them as evidence of her strength but also as a matter of utility: If she must remain in Washington in January for President Donald Trump's impeachment trial in the Senate, these endorsers will double as active surrogates.But as Klobuchar and Buttigieg fight for the state's center-left, Klobuchar faces some challenges that Buttigieg does not.Though her campaign has doubled its field offices in Iowa and recently brought on Norm Sterzenbach, a veteran Democratic strategist in the state, her operation is still relatively small. She also lacks Buttigieg's fundraising prowess, which could hinder her ability to compete with deeper-pocketed candidates in the race.And scarred by Hillary Clinton's loss to Trump in 2016, some Iowans say they are wary of nominating another woman. David Lange, 58, who came to hear Klobuchar in Osceola, said he thought she had "a chance to win," citing her debate performances in particular. But though he said that he did not have any qualms about her, he voiced a broader concern: "I think there are still a fair number of people who won't vote for a woman."At the same time, Klobuchar is plain-spoken in prescribing ways out of what she sees as the country's ills, with a reach-across-the-aisle legislative record that continues to endear her to people in Iowa. She frequently leans on her wit, flecking her appearances with wry jokes — about her hair, about Trump — that often prompt appreciative laughs in return. In Creston, she began her remarks balanced on a step ladder — a gesture, it seemed, for people in the back — before professing a fear that she would fall off.Buttigieg, on the other hand, is a carefully honed case, so consistently earnest he can come across as monochromatic. In recent days, he has begun speckling his remarks with more populist themes, like the value of work."I am running to be a president for the guy who's up early in the morning in the dark scraping the windshield on his way to the first of the jobs that he is going to do over the course of the day," he said in Indianola. "Who's standing up for him?"His message, at once reliably patriotic and steeped with the conviction that America can do better, has lifted him to the top of recent polls in Iowa, where there is a heavy fixation on selecting a candidate who can beat Trump.At this point, he is also managing to do what Klobuchar is still working toward: turning a surge in interest into firm commitment."It's definitely Pete," said Brandon Marsh, 39, of Des Moines, who came to see Buttigieg in Indianola. "I think he has a good grasp on the world."Nancy Corkrean, 74, said she had decided about six weeks ago that she would caucus for Buttigieg."I like that he's middle of the road; he's all-encompassing; he's bringing us back together again," she said. "After I've been to one of his campaign events, I feel like we're healing again; we're getting back to normalcy."Her granddaughter, Sophie Stover, 19, of Winterset, showed a reporter her recently signed commit-to-caucus card, in Buttigieg's campaign colors of blue and gold. And Corkrean's husband, Pat Corkrean, 79, was getting there as well: He still liked Biden, but he was "75%" for Buttigieg now, too.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company



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