Tag Archives: internet

No, it’s not just you: Half of the internet is down, including Google, Amazon, and Reddit

No, it’s not just you: Half of the internet is down, including Google, Amazon, and RedditWhat better way to start off the week than by not being able to use virtually any online service or access half of the internet's most popular sites? That seems to be the case, as DownDetector (and many tweets) suggest that Google, Amazon, Reddit, and Spectrum — just to name a few — are experiencing issues this morning. Those issues appear to have begun around 6 or 7 AM ET, just as the East Coast was starting its day.Although some of these connection problems appear to be clearing up as of 8:40 AM (for example, Feedly is finally loading for me after being inaccessible since before 8:00 AM), it's likely going to take some time before everything is running smoothly again. Reports are still going up on DownDetector as of writing.It's unclear what is causing half of the internet to go down, but an ominous message from Discord refers to the issue as a "general internet outage," which doesn't sound like something that should be possible:https://twitter.com/ChrisGSeaton/status/1143136635153977345About an hour ago, internet service company Cloudflare says that it "identified a possible route leak impacting some Cloudflare IP ranges." [UPDATE: To be clear, Verizon was responsible for the outage, and Cloudflare was just keeping its customers informed during the recovery process.]Cloudflare followed up with another update about an hour later explaining that the leak "is impacting many internet services including Cloudflare," and moments later, announced that the network responsible for the leak had fixed the issues as of 8:42 AM ET. In theory, the worst of the outage is over.We'll be keeping an eye out for any residual issues that pop up in the hours to come, but we also hope to get a more detailed explanation for why this happened from the network responsible in the near future.UPDATE | 3:30 PM: After service was restored, Cloudflare issued the following statement (via TechCrunch):> Earlier today, a widespread BGP routing leak affected a number of Internet services and a portion of traffic to Cloudflare. All of Cloudflare's systems continued to run normally, but traffic wasn't getting to us for a portion of our domains. At this point, the network outage has been fixed and traffic levels are returning to normal.> > BGP acts as the backbone of the Internet, routing traffic through Internet transit providers and then to services like Cloudflare. There are more than 700k routes across the Internet. By nature, route leaks are localized and can be caused by error or through malicious intent. We've written extensively about BGP and how we've adopted RPKI to help further secure it.Cloudflare CEO Matthew Prince also offered a biting take of his own on Twitter:https://twitter.com/eastdakota/status/1143182575680143361



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Prosecutors: Teen killed after fake internet offer

Prosecutors: Teen killed after fake internet offerAuthorities say Alaska teens hoping to cash in on a $ 9 million online offer brutally killed a woman on a popular trail outside Anchorage, shooting her in the back of the head and dumping her body in a river. (June 18)



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T-Mobile’s latest pitch for Sprint merger: Taking on cable internet and TV

T-Mobile’s latest pitch for Sprint merger: Taking on cable internet and TVT-Mobile's latest pitch to regulators to approve its merger with Sprint: They need to team up to take on home broadband.



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Medical equipment and internet fails as Venezuela is plunged into darkness during 16-hour blackout

Medical equipment and internet fails as Venezuela is plunged into darkness during 16-hour blackoutVenezuela was almost entirely without power on Friday morning amid a blackout that the Maduro government blamed on sabotage and which wrought chaos across much of the country. Communications went down, water pumps failed and transport ground to a halt as Venezuela was plunged into darkness at around 5pm local time (9pm UK) on Thursday night. The power cut was believed to have hit up to 23 of the country’s 24 states, though with mobile networks and internet largely out of action, the situation in some areas was unclear.  In Caracas and elsewhere, workers were forced to walk miles to get home as the lights went out in the oil-rich South American nation. There were reports of life support machines and other essential medical equipment failing at hospitals without back-up generators. In the capital, municipal officials said they had attended emergency calls from residents reliant on oxygen machines. School and labour activities were suspended, businesses were shuttered and many Venezuelans were virtually stranded in their homes. There was no word as to when the power cut might end, with fears that it could last for days – a daunting prospect for Venezuelans already struggling to survive amid punishing shortages of food, medicine and cash. People go about their business at a shopping mall in Caracas as the blackout continues Credit: Reuters Amid a deepening international crisis over his leadership, Nicolas Maduro blamed the blackout on an “electric war” waged by the enemies of his Socialist government, claiming “sabotage” at the Guri hydroelectric dam.  “The electric war announced and directed by US imperialism against our people will be defeated. Nothing and no one will be able to defeat the people of Bolívar y Chávez,” he said, calling for “maximum unity of patriots!" But for most Venezuelans, the government’s claims did not ring true, with many noting that Guri was state-operated and under tight security. Instead they pinned the blackout on years of infrastructural decay, a lack of investment and poor maintenance under the Maduro government. A view of Caracas during the blackout Credit: Reuters Juan Guaidó, the National Assembly leader who has been recognised as interim president by more than 50 countries, said the blackout demonstrated the “inefficiency of the usurper”, referring to Mr Maduro. The recovery of the electricity sector and the country would come with “the end of the usurpation,” he added.  Mike Pompeo, the US secretary of state, said: “The power outage and the devastation hurting ordinary Venezuelans is not because of the USA. It’s not because of Colombia.  It’s not Ecuador or Brazil, Europe or anywhere else. Power shortages and starvation are the result of the Maduro regime’s incompetence.” “Maduro’s policies bring nothing but darkness,” he wrote on Twitter. “No food. No medicine. Now, no power. Next, no Maduro.” In Caracas, long lines snaked around the few open shops and petrol stations as residents began to panic buy food and fuel. With cash in short supply, no electricity to process card payments and groceries running low, it was a fractious and gruelling task. In one store in the affluent Altamira area of the city, arguments broke out over bread as shoppers queued for up to two hours to purchase whatever food they could find.  Elena, a middle aged resident who did not wish to give her last name, told The Telegraph that previous power outages had never been like this. The severity, and the almost complete failure of phone networks, was frightening everyone, she said, speculating that more was afoot than a technical issue.  Travelers wait during the 16-hour power cut at Barquisimeto airport Credit: Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP “No one knows what is going on,” she said. “Something is happening, whether it’s on one (political) side or the other”. A doctor working at the Hospital Vargas in the West of the city, who did not wish to be identified, said the blackout was making already difficult conditions even worse. She said intensive care and the emergencies department were relying on petrol-fuelled generators, but that would not last forever. The rest of the facility was already in darkness. In the hospital’s neighborhood of Cotiza, frustrated people were coming out of their homes into the streets, she said, while police were standing by, some in riot gear. She feared the situation could quickly descend into unrest, saying the atmosphere was one of “tension” and drawing parallels to the infamous Caracazo fuel riots of 1989 in which hundreds of people died. Javier, a 44-year-old lawyer who preferred not to give his last name, said he and his wife were worried for their 3 children. “We can hang on for a day, or maybe two, but what’s going to happen on the third day?”  He put the blame squarely on the Maduro government, and the “lack of investment throughout the last 20 years” as money was instead siphoned off by a “corrupt regime”. “They took the money for themselves”, he told the Telegraph, adding: “That is why all this is happening.” After almost 24 hours, much of the country still remained under blackout, though electricity began to be restored to some areas of Caracas yesterday afternoon. In the centre of the capital, there was a heavy police and military presence, with the road to Miraflores, the presidential palace, closed and guarded.  Outside the Hospital Vargas, Agustin, 34, who preferred not to give his last name, was leaning against a wall, sick and visibly jaundiced. He had arrived at 5pm on Thursday for treatment to find the hospital already almost entirely without power. Agustin had travelled from the town of Higuerote, more than an hour and a half away, after his local facility said he needed tests and likely an operation that they could not provide. But without electricity, all the hospital could do was give him a sedative, he told The Telegraph. “I can’t even go home because the transport isn’t running as there isn’t enough fuel.” There were reports from around the country of hospitals’ generators failing, and patients being ventilated by hand. Speaking in the neighbourhood of Los Palos Grandes, Mr Guaidó said nine deaths had so far been reported due to the power cut. This “crisis, this tragedy” was the fault of the “corrupt” Maduro regime, he added.



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France unveils new tax for global internet giants

France unveils new tax for global internet giantsFrance on Wednesday introduced a bill to tax internet and technology giants such as Google and Facebook on their digital sales, putting it among a vanguard of countries seeking to force the companies to pay more in the markets where they operate. Speaking to reporters, Economy Minister Bruno Le Maire described the levy as “a first step” in setting up “a 21st century taxation system”. The tax, to be applied retroactively from January 1, sets a three percent levy on digital advertising, websites and the resale of private data by internet giants.



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France Says Internet Platforms Could Be Fined for Racist Content

France Says Internet Platforms Could Be Fined for Racist ContentPresident Emmanuel Macron on Wednesday night told the annual meeting of France’s largest Jewish organization that a law could be presented in May in response to a recent spate of anti-Semitic incidents. “There will be an obligation for results: if the content is not taken down then there will be a fine, and a large fine,” Mahjoubi said on France Info radio.



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Venezuela state internet provider blocks volunteer aid page

Venezuela state internet provider blocks volunteer aid pageVenezuela’s state internet provider CANTV has blocked a webpage where volunteers sign up to answer National Assembly president Juan Guaido’s call to help bring in desperately needed humanitarian aid, the opposition said on Monday. Guaido says he wants one million volunteers by Saturday, the deadline day he has set to bring in the aid piling up at the border with Colombia and aiming to alleviate food and medicine shortages. Last week the opposition hit out at CANTV for redirecting the volunteers webpage to another almost identical looking site to prevent more people from signing up to self-declared acting president Guaido’s cause.



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'Total internet shutdown' in Zimbabwe: provider

'Total internet shutdown' in Zimbabwe: providerZimbabwe imposed a “total shutdown” of the internet on Friday, a major provider told customers, after protests early this week triggered a ruthless security crackdown. The internet had been partially restored after a first shutdown started on Tuesday. “We were served with another directive for total shutdown of the internet until further notice,” Econet, the country’s biggest provider, said in a text message on Friday.



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Internet rips into Jeff Bezos' divorce announcement calling it an 'Alexit'

Internet rips into Jeff Bezos' divorce announcement calling it an 'Alexit'Unless you’ve literally been hiding under an internet-less rock, it’s safe to



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New Zealand warns Google after internet giant breaches court order in Grace Millane murder case

New Zealand warns Google after internet giant breaches court order in Grace Millane murder caseNew Zealand warned Google to "take responsibility" for its news content on Wednesday, after the internet giant broke a court order suppressing the name of a man charged with murdering a British backpacker. Jesse Kempson, 26, has been charged with the murder of Grace Millane, a 22-year-old from Essex who was last seen alive in Auckland on December 1. A week later, her body was found in the Waitakere Ranges 10 metres away from the road. The defendant's name is not allowed to be published in New Zealand. The judge refused  to grant a suppression order, but the media are not allowed to name him because the accused sought to appeal. But Google revealed his identity in an email to subscribers of its "what’s trending in New Zealand?" service. Justice Minister Andrew Little said the breach was unacceptable and he had made his views known to Google executives at a meeting in parliament on Tuesday night. While Google has argued the breach was inadvertent and it was unaware of the court order when the automatically generated email went out, Mr Little said that was not good enough. Judge Evangelos Thomas granted the suspect interim name suppression this month pending appeal Credit: Getty "I put the ball back in their court," he told commercial radio on Wednesday. "If they choose to set up their algorithms and distribute news, they’ve got to take responsibility for that." Mr Little said he met two local Google executives, and a senior legal counsel from the company’s California headquarters joined them by video. He said they appeared genuinely concerned about the breach and assured him they were working to ensure it did not happen again, with another meeting scheduled for early 2019 to assess their progress. Mr Little conceded that controlling information on the internet and social media was challenging but said court orders were made for a reason and must be respected. "We can’t just stand back and say this is all too hard," he said. "The price of that (would be) we have to capitulate and concede what are very important rights that anyone going through the courts has." He said the case highlighted the potential need for an international agreement if Google "won’t do anything (or) can’t do anything" to resolve the issue. "They can expect us to talk to partner countries around the world who have a similar interest… about reaching an agreement to enforce each others’ orders in each others’ countries," he said. "That may well happen inevitably anyway because it’s not just Google, there are others as well and we have to protect the integrity of our court system."



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