Tag Archives: Impeachment

Nadler on impeachment: 'We may get to that, we may not'

Nadler on impeachment: 'We may get to that, we may not'House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler called President Trump’s repeated efforts to thwart the investigation as outlined in special counsel Robert Mueller’s report potential grounds for impeachment.



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‘Nothing wrong with taking information from Russians’, Giuliani says as Democrats keep Trump impeachment options open

‘Nothing wrong with taking information from Russians’, Giuliani says as Democrats keep Trump impeachment options openDonald Trump’s personal lawyer has claimed there was “nothing wrong” with his campaign taking information from Russia, as the fallout and toxicity triggered by the publication of Robert Mueller’s report grew.As Democrats said they were keeping open their options of seeking to impeach Mr Trump for his alleged efforts to obstruct Mr Mueller’s probe, Rudy Giuliani went on the offensive, saying “any politician” in the US would have sought damaging information about an electoral rival.“There’s nothing wrong with taking information from Russians,” Mr Giuliani told CNN. Asked by CNN host Jake Tapper if he would have taken information from a foreign source, the former New York city mayor replied: “I probably wouldn’t. I wasn’t asked. I would have advised, just out of excess of caution, don’t do it.”Mr Giuliani’s defence of the president came after senator Mitt Romney, the 2012 Republican presidential candidate who lost to Barack Obama, launched a scathing attack on Mr Trump’s campaign, following the release of Mr Mueller’s report. While the report said it did not find evidence the Trump campaign colluded with Russia, it said the “investigation established multiple links between Trump campaign officials and individuals tied to the Russian government”. It also said, Russia’s alleged interference in the election was intended to help Mr Trump.Among those interactions was a now infamous meeting at Trump Tower in New York in the summer of 2016, when Mr Trump’s eldest son and other campaign members, met with a Kremlin-linked lawyer who had allegedly offered incriminating information about Hillary Clinton. The president later said no such information had been provided, and that the Russian lawyer, Natalia Veselnitskaya, was seeking to lobby the campaign on overturning a specific US sanction targeting several Russians.Mr Romney, one of a just a handful of senior Republicans to voice concern about the report’s finding, said in a statement released on Friday: “I am sickened at the extent and pervasiveness of dishonesty and misdirection by individuals in the highest office of the land, including the president.“I am also appalled that, among other things, fellow citizens working in a campaign for president welcomed help from Russia.”Speaking on Sunday, Mr Giuliani claimed Mr Romney’s 2012 campaign had also tried to “dig up dirt on people”. “Stop the bull. What a hypocrite. What a hypocrite,” Mr Giuliani said. “Any candidate in the whole world in America would take information – who says it’s even illegal?”Democrats are now confronted with a difficult choice of whether to push for Mr Trump’s impeachment, something favoured by progressives such as Elizabeth Warren and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, or focus their efforts on defeating him in the 2020 election.Democrat Jerry Nadler, chair of the House of Representative’s judiciary committee, whose panel would lead any impeachment proceedings, said his party would press ahead with investigations of Mr Trump in congress and “see where the facts lead us”.“Obstruction of justice, if proven, would be impeachable,” he told NBC News.Congressman Adam Schiff, chair of the same chamber’s intelligence committee, told Fox News the issue of whether to seek Mr Trump’s impeachment would be “very consequential”. He added: “I’m going to reserve judgment on until we have a chance to fully deliberate on it.”



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Democrats 'may' pursue impeachment against Donald Trump as Giuliani defends president

Democrats 'may' pursue impeachment against Donald Trump as Giuliani defends presidentDonald Trump's lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, said it would have been OK for the president to accept Russia's help in the campaign.



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Schiff Says Democrats Will Debate Impeachment

Schiff Says Democrats Will Debate Impeachment(Bloomberg) — House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff said Sunday that the Democrats will discuss whether to begin impeachment hearings of President Donald Trump after progressives ratcheted up the pressure on a reluctant party leadership.



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Giuliani rails against Mueller report as Democrats mull Trump impeachment

Giuliani rails against Mueller report as Democrats mull Trump impeachmentTrump lawyer: ‘Nothing wrong with information from Russians’Teflon Don: how Trump the mafia boss fought the law … and wonOpinion: Moral squalor, not impeachment, will remove Trump Donald and Melania Trump arrive at the Bethesda-by-the-Sea church for Easter services in Palm Beach, Florida. Photograph: Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images As the White House mounted a furious assault on the Mueller report and critics of a president not found to have conspired with Russia but not cleared of obstruction of justice, the chair of the House judiciary committee said obstruction, if proven, “would be [an] impeachable” offence. Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani appeared on multiple Sunday talk shows, arguing with interviewers in a series of chaotic encounters. On Fox News Sunday, he claimed Robert Mueller’s 448-page report, which was released with redactions on Thursday, was full of “calumny, lies and distortion”. On CNN’s State of the Union, the former New York mayor went as far as to call one of Mueller’s lawyers a “hitman” and claim the special counsel’s team “came close to torturing people” in the questioning and confinement of Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort, who was convicted and sentenced on financial charges. Asked on NBC’s Meet the Press why Trump was so angry at Mueller and former White House counsel Don McGahn, a key witness, Giuliani replied: “Because they tried to frame him.” There’s nothing wrong with taking information from Russians. It depends on where it came from Rudy Giuliani The first volume of Mueller’s report concerns Russian election interference and the Trump campaign’s warm reception to “Russian offers of assistance”, including an infamous June 2016 meeting with a Kremlin-linked lawyer offering “dirt” on Hillary Clinton. Giuliani told CNN: “There’s nothing wrong with taking information from Russians. It depends on where it came from.” On ABC’s This Week, White House adviser Kellyanne Conway, who previously called the inquiry a “a political proctology exam”, took a different tone, saying: “The campaign I managed in those last few months did not welcome help from Russia. In fact, I don’t recall getting, being offered help from Russia. It would have been a ridiculous prospect.” In his second volume, Mueller considers potential obstruction of justice by Trump or his campaign, of which 11 possible instances are listed. He passed judgment on the issue to Congress. House judiciary committee chair Jerrold Nadler told NBC that if the evidence shows Trump obstructed justice, “some of this would be impeachable, yes”. He added that Democrats plan to “go where the evidence leads”. Democrats remain split on impeachment, which would begin in the House they control but almost certainly fail in the Republican Senate. Some fear it would galvanise Trump’s supporters and win him sympathy among independents. On Fox, House intelligence chair Adam Schiff said to impeach or not to impeach was “going to be a very consequential decision and one I’m going to reserve judgment on until we have a chance to fully deliberate on it”. House oversight chair Elijah Cummings told CBS’s Face the Nation he could “foresee [impeachment] possibly coming”. But he said: “We have to be very careful here. The American people, a lot of them clearly still don’t believe that President Trump is doing things to destroy our democracy and has done a lot of things very poorly.” He also said he thought “history would smile upon us for standing up for the constitution”. The American people, a lot of them clearly still don’t believe President Trump is doing things to destroy our democracy Elijah Cummings Giuliani expended significant energy attacking McGahn, who is cited by Mueller in descriptions of orders from Trump to fire the special counsel, which McGahn did not do. McGahn’s recollection was “wrong”, Giuliani said on CNN, claiming the experienced lawyer was “confused [and] cannot be relied upon”. Mueller depicts McGahn taking notes of meetings with Trump, a practice Trump is said to have questioned. The Trump campaign has severed links with the law firm to which McGahn returned. On CNN, an incensed Giuliani made the “hitman” claim about Andrew Weissmann, a prosecutor Trump allies claim is too close to the Clintons. “I have no problem with investigating Russian interference in the election,” Giuliani said, adding: “The reality is, you think this is the first time the Russians have interfered with a presidential election?” Special counsel Robert Mueller and his wife Ann Cabell Standish leave St John’s Episcopal Church in Washington. Photograph: Andrew Harnik/AP Giuliani was pressed on criticism of Trump by the 2012 Republican nominee, Mitt Romney, who said he was “sickened at the extent and pervasiveness of dishonesty and misdirection by individuals in the highest office of the land, including the president”. “Stop the bull, stop this pious act,” Giuliani said, adding: “Who says [taking information from Russians is] even illegal? Who says it’s even illegal? And then does the information turn out to be false, by the way?” Referring to Democratic party emails hacked by Russia and obtained by WikiLeaks, he said: “The information that was gleaned and disseminated, every newspaper printed it. Why did the Washington Post
print the information that came from a foreign source, when they knew it was hacked? Aren’t they just as wrong for doing that as the campaign wanting to use it?” Of Giuliani’s claim there was “nothing wrong with taking information from Russians”, former US attorney Preet Bharara, who was fired by Trump in 2017, told CNN: “That’s an extraordinary statement and I would hope he would retract it.” Giuliani ran against Romney for the 2008 Republican nomination, both losing to John McCain. Asked if he would have accepted such information, Giuliani said: “I probably wouldn’t. I wasn’t asked. I would have advised, just out of excess of caution, don’t do it.” He also accused Romney of doing “things very similar”, although he did not elaborate. Asked if Trump thought Russian interference helped him win, Giuliani told NBC: “Whether he did or he didn’t, I think it’s quite clear that there are a lot of factors that go into any election and the reality is he was elected president.” Conway told ABC Trump “didn’t need WikiLeaks. We had Wisconsin. He won because he was the better candidate”. Trump has repeatedly claimed Mueller’s investigation exonerated him, which it did not, and called the inquiry a “hoax”. He continued to tweet on Sunday, from his Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida. Attending church, the president was asked if he felt betrayed by staffers who spoke to Mueller. According to the White House pool report, he “clearly heard the question” but “just smiled and turned away”.



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Mueller report: Elizabeth Warren becomes first 2020 candidate to call for Trump’s impeachment

Mueller report: Elizabeth Warren becomes first 2020 candidate to call for Trump’s impeachmentElizabeth Warren has become the first 2020 election candidate to make a clear call for impeachment proceedings against Donald Trump following the release of special counsel Robert Mueller’s redacted report.The Massachusetts senator tweeted that it would be damaging to “ignore a president’s repeated efforts to obstruct an investigation into his own disloyal behaviour” and would allow future presidents to act in the same way. She added: “The severity of this misconduct demands that elected officials in both parties set aside political considerations and do their constitutional duty. That means the House should initiate impeachment proceedings against the president of the United States.”Mr Mueller, who examined whether Mr Trump’s campaign coordinated with Russia during the 2016 election and whether the president tried to interfere with the inquiry, made no clear verdict on obstruction of justice.His report did, however, lay out 11 possible attempts to influence the investigation – although he indicated the president was “mostly unsuccessful” because his aides refused to carry out orders.Other Democrats running in 2020 have been more cautious on impeachment than Ms Warren in their response to the publication. Julian Castro said it would be “perfectly reasonable for congress to open up those proceedings”.Both Jay Inslee of Washington and Eric Swalwell – both of whom have recently launched presidential campaigns – said only that the idea should not be taken off the table.Other Democratic candidates, including senators Cory Booker and Kamala Harris, suggested it was too soon to start impeachment proceedings.> The severity of this misconduct demands that elected officials in both parties set aside political considerations and do their constitutional duty. That means the House should initiate impeachment proceedings against the President of the United States.> > — Elizabeth Warren (@ewarren) > > April 19, 2019“We don’t have an unredacted version of the report. We don’t have the underlying materials that that report was written upon. We haven’t had yet an opportunity to have hearings where we interview Mueller,” said Mr Booker said during a campaign stop in Reno, Nevada.“I think that’s there definitely a conversation to be had on that subject, but first I want to hear from Bob Mueller and really understand what exactly is the evidence that supports the summary that we’ve been given,” said Ms Harris on impeachment hearings.Pete Buttigieg, the Indiana mayor also running for the White House, suggested it was not the best way to get rid of Mr Trump.He told NBC’s Late Night with Seth Meyers: “If we really want to send Trumpism into the history books, the best thing we can do is defeat it decisively at the ballot box in 2020.”Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, while not running in 2020, has signed on to an impeachment resolution from fellow Democrat, Rashida Tlaib.The chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, Jerrold Nadler, has issued a subpoena for the full Mueller report and expects the Justice Department to comply by 1 May. Attorney general William Barr is to appear before the committee on 2 May, while Mr Nadler has also summoned Mr Mueller to testify by 23 May.The only Republican who had declared he will run against Donald Trump in 2020 said on Friday he was “horrified” by special counsel Robert Mueller’s report, but said he could not back impeachment for “political reasons”.The former Massachusetts governor Bill Weld told ABC News: “It’s very unlikely that he would ever be convicted in the Senate where you need a two thirds vote”.



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Mueller report revives Trump impeachment talk, even as Democratic leaders try to tamp it down

Mueller report revives Trump impeachment talk, even as Democratic leaders try to tamp it down“Damning” details found in Robert Mueller’s probe into Russian interference in the 2016 election have sparked impeachment talk again.



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Trump and impeachment: where Democrats stand after Mueller

Trump and impeachment: where Democrats stand after MuellerElizabeth Warren and Rashida Tlaib have called for action, but many lawmakers say more information is needed firstElizabeth Warren was the first 2020 presidential candidate to call for impeachment. Photograph: Kristopher Radder/APLong before a redacted version of the Mueller report was released this week, the winds of impeachment were swirling around Donald Trump’s presidency.Nonetheless, the findings in the 448-page report, which include 11 instances in which Trump or his campaign engaged in potential obstruction of justice, have increased pressure on prominent Democrats to take a stand on the issue.Articles of impeachment would have to pass the Democratic-controlled House. But to remove the president from office, two-thirds of the Republican-controlled Senate would need to vote in favor.The House speaker, Nancy Pelosi, has repeatedly resisted calls for impeachment. She and other Democrats fear the process, which would be overwhelmingly likely to fail in the Senate, would become a political distraction and that the party should instead bet on the ballot box in 2020 as the way to get Trump out of the White House.Nonetheless, in the wake of the Mueller report, prominent Democrats including presidential contenders, committee chairs and rank-and-file lawmakers found themselves having to position themselves as for impeachment, against it … or somewhere in between. For impeachment> I read the Mueller report. When I got to the end, I realized this is a point of principle. Because it matters not just for this president, but for all future presidents. No one is above the law. pic.twitter.com/RdAHQYoH0V> > — Elizabeth Warren (@ewarren) April 20, 2019Elizabeth Warren: The Massachusetts senator was the first 2020 presidential candidate to call for impeachment, writing that not holding such proceedings “would suggest that both the current and future presidents would be free to abuse their power in similar ways”.“The severity of this misconduct demands that elected officials in both parties set aside political considerations and do their constitutional duty,” she tweeted. “That means the House should initiate impeachment proceedings against the president of the United States.”Julián Castro: The former housing secretary and hopeful for the Democratic nomination said he would support Congress opening impeachment proceedings, telling CNN “it would be perfectly reasonable for Congress” to do so.Tom Steyer: The billionaire explored running for president until January, with impeachment as a key part of his platform. Despite deciding not to run, he has continued to pursue impeachment. In response to Warren’s support, he said she was “one of the people in Washington who has the moral courage to do what’s right”.> We’re going to impeach the motherfucker> > Rashida TlaibRashida Tlaib: A month before the redacted Mueller report was released, the Michigan representative introduced an impeachment resolution. “We all swore to protect our nation, and that begins with making sure that no one, including the president of the United States, is acting above the law,” Tlaib wrote in a letter to colleagues. She also called for Trump’s impeachment on her first day in office in January, in a Detroit Free Press opinion piece and at a swearing-in event, where she commented: “We’re going to impeach the motherfucker.”Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez: On Thursday, Ocasio-Cortez said she would sign-on to Tlaib’s resolution, in the wake of the Mueller report. “Many know I take no pleasure in discussions of impeachment. I didn’t campaign on it, and rarely discuss it unprompted,” the New York representative and progressive star tweeted. “We all prefer working on our priorities: pushing Medicare for All, tackling student loans, and a Green New Deal. But the report squarely puts this on our doorstep.”Maxine Waters: The Californian who chairs the House finance committee – and who has been attacked by Trump – backed impeachment on Thursday. “Congress’s failure to impeach is complacency in the face of the erosion of our democracy and constitutional norms,” she said. “Congress’s failure to impeach would set a dangerous precedent and imperil the nation as it would vest too much power in the executive branch and embolden future officeholders to further debase the US presidency, if that’s even possible.”Al Green: The Texas representative has pushed for impeachment since Trump fired the FBI director James Comey in May 2017, forcing two unsuccessful votes on the articles of impeachment. He continues to push on. “I call for the impeachment of the president of the United States of America,” Green said in a press conference streamed on Facebook. “This rests solely now on the shoulders of the Congress of the United States of America.” Against impeachmentNancy Pelosi speaks on Capitol Hill. Photograph: Yuri Gripas/ReutersNancy Pelosi: The speaker of the House has a delicate path to tread and has not encouraged voters to believe she will initiate impeachment proceedings, instead pointing to fierce oversight of the White House by Democratic-led committees.“Let me assure you that whatever the issue and challenge we face, the Congress of the United States will honor its oath of office to protect and defend the Constitution of the United States to protect our democracy,” she told reporters this week. “We believe that the first article – Article I, the legislative branch – has the responsibility of oversight of our democracy, and we will exercise that.”> The avenue is not impeachment. The avenue is further disclosure to the American people> > Hakeem JeffriesHakeem Jeffries: The New York representative who chairs the House Democratic caucus said voters were much more interested in issues beyond impeachment. “The avenue is not impeachment,” he said this week. “The avenue is further disclosure to the American people.”Angus King: The independent senator from Maine, who caucuses with Democrats, said the decision to keep Trump as president – or not – should be taken by voters. “In my view, there’s an even better political process coming right down the road on almost the same time frame and that’s the elections of 2020,” King told CNN on Friday. “For Congress to go through an impeachment process would be, it would take probably 18 months, which would lead right up to the election. And it would be divisive.” Somewhere in betweenPete Buttigieg: The mayor of South Bend, Indiana, another 2020 hopeful who has surged in the polls, said there was “evidence that this president deserves to be impeached”. But he also said it was up to Congress to decide whether to proceed, prompting debate over his true meaning.> The idea is to find out exactly what went on, who did what> > Jerrold NadlerJerrold Nadler: The chairman of the House judiciary committee said his panel would hold “major hearings” with prominent people featured in the Mueller report. The New York representative, who has subpoenaed the unredacted report, has discussed impeachment repeatedly as it would originate with his committee. This week he remained noncommittal.“The idea is not whether to debate articles of impeachment,” Nadler said. “The idea is to find out exactly what went on, who did what, what institutional safeguards were gotten around and how they were gotten around, and then decide what to do about it.”Amy Klobuchar: The Minnesota senator, running for the Democratic nomination, falls very much on the “let’s investigate more” side of things. She told reporters on Friday she wants to see Mueller testify before the Senate judiciary committee, of which she is a member. “I think you’ve seen all the senators are very cautious about talking about this because we would be the jury if there was any kind of an action brought over from the House,” she said.Kamala Harris says ‘there is definitely a conversation to be had’ about impeachment. Photograph: Gerald Herbert/APKamala Harris: “I think that there is definitely a conversation to be had on that subject,” the California senator and presidential hopeful told MSNBC on Thursday, “but first I want to hear from Bob Mueller and really understand what exactly is the evidence that supports the summary that we have been given today.”Cory Booker: Speaking in Nevada on Friday, the New Jersey senator, who is also a member of the judiciary committee and a 2020 hopeful, said it was too soon to discuss impeachment because Congress has not seen the unredacted report and has not had a chance to interview Mueller. “There’s a lot more investigation that should go on before Congress comes to any conclusions like that,” he said.Bernie Sanders: At a South Carolina campaign stop on Friday, the Vermont senator ignored questions from reporters about impeachment. Instead he tweeted: “While we have more detail from today’s report than before, Congress must continue its investigation into Trump’s conduct and any foreign attempts to influence our election.”> We must also work to do everything we can to protect our future elections from the significant threat of foreign interference, and I call on President Trump and Republican leadership to stop obstructing the necessary work to protect our democracy.> > — Bernie Sanders (@BernieSanders) April 18, 2019Beto O’Rourke: The 2020 contender and former Texas representative said he believed voters cared more about policy discussions than impeachment, telling reporters on Thursday: “I don’t know that impeachment and those proceedings in the House and potential trial in the Senate is going to answer those questions for people.”Elijah Cummings: The House oversight committee chairman told MSNBC on Friday the Mueller report revealed actions that were “at least 100 times worse” than those that led to Bill Clinton’s impeachment in 1998. “We’ve got to go against this, we’ve got to expose it. A lot of people keep asking about the question of impeachment,” Cummings said. “But right now, let’s make sure we understand what Mueller was doing, understand what Barr was doing, and see the report in an unredacted form, and all of the underlying documents.”Eric Swalwell: The California representative, also running for president, told MSNBC on Friday impeachment was “a conversation we have to have as far as holding this president accountable” but stopped short of saying whether he supported impeachment proceedings. “I’m for bringing Bob Mueller in and see what the evidence is,” he said.Steny Hoyer: The House majority leader, from Maryland, said the Mueller report was “a damning recitation of lies, misinformation, and malfeasance” that clearly sets a basis for “probable cause that crimes were, in fact, committed”. But he did not mention impeachment.



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I've warned that impeachment talk is dangerous, but the time has come: Laurence Tribe

I've warned that impeachment talk is dangerous, but the time has come: Laurence TribeThe consequential decision to impeach should not be made lightly. But Mueller's damning report is an invitation that Congress shouldn't refuse.



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Democrats subpoena Mueller report amid calls for impeachment

Democrats subpoena Mueller report amid calls for impeachmentWASHINGTON (AP) — The chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, Rep. Jerrold Nadler, has issued a subpoena for special counsel Robert Mueller's full report as Democrats intensified their investigation of President Donald Trump, but leaders stopped short of liberal demands for impeachment proceedings.



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