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Teenager shoots at cars while shouting ‘I don’t like white people in my hood’, police say

Teenager shoots at cars while shouting ‘I don’t like white people in my hood’, police sayA black teenager shouted “I don’t like white people in my hood” before chasing four people with a gun and firing multiple shots at them, according to court documents.Cincinnati Police said 18 year old Devonta Allen was filmed firing three shots at the alleged victims, hitting the two vehicles they were in but missing everyone inside.Three of the people involved in the incident were white and the other individual was African-American, according to a criminal complaint.After turning himself in, Mr Allen admitted to the shooting but claimed the alleged victims were armed and fired at him first.However, police said: “This and other statements made by Allen are inconsistent with the videotape evidence and statements from the victims and witnesses.”The incident initially started because of a stolen car, according to police.Video of the confrontation has reportedly not been released because it is considered evidence in court.Cincinnati Police said the incident was filmed in the neighbourhood of Kennedy Heights, Ohio, on 25 July.Despite Mr Allen’s alleged outburst, local people said they did not think the teenager lived in the neighbourhood.“I’d never seen him before and I don’t know who he was friends with,” a neighbour, who chose to remain anonymous, told Fox 19 news channel.Although no one was hurt, Mr Allen faces four counts of felony assault over the incident and is being held at the Hamilton County jail.His attorney reportedly said in court that the teenager has no adult record but understands how serious the charges are.A judge has ordered him to be held on a $ 480,000 (£396,000) bond.



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‘I am disgusted’: New Yorkers react to Trump telling congresswomen to ‘go back’ to their countries

‘I am disgusted’: New Yorkers react to Trump telling congresswomen to ‘go back’ to their countriesNew Yorkers, like much of the country, have some strong opinions about the latest controversy engulfing President Trump.

“I am disgusted at the Republicans,” said Randi, of Manhattan. “I can’t believe no one stands up to him. I thought of myself as independent, and I’m forced into being a Democrat.”



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‘I saw hate in his eyes’: White security guard pulls gun on black police officer

‘I saw hate in his eyes’: White security guard pulls gun on black police officerSheriff’s deputy Alan Gaston thought they were on the same side.One man, Mr Gaston, was a high-ranking officer in the Lucas County, Ohio, sheriff’s department with 34 years of experience.The other was a security guard contracted to protect an Internal Revenue Service (IRS) office in Toledo.But then the guard pulled his gun. He raised his voice. He put a hand on Mr Gaston’s arm and rested his finger on the trigger.In a matter of seconds, what began with a routine errand at the IRS escalated into a frightening standoff between a white security guard and a black police officer, who said he heard hate in the guard’s shouts and believed he would be shot.“You don’t expect to be ambushed by someone who you think is on the same team,” Mr Gaston told The Washington Post.“I feel there was definitely some racial overtones involved. And I’m not the type of person to throw the race card, I’m just telling you the facts. I looked in his eyes and I saw hate in his eyes.”He had stopped by the IRS office during his shift on 31 May to ask a question about a letter the agency sent him.He was in full uniform, his badge and his firearm in clear view.The security guard, identified in court documents as Seth Eklund, asked Mr Gaston to leave his gun in his patrol car.When Mr Gaston replied he couldn’t do that, he said Mr Eklund became hostile. Mr Eklund accused Mr Gaston of reaching for his weapon, shouting “get your hands off your gun”, even though Mr Gaston said his hands were visible and nowhere near his holster.Mr Gaston, who has years of experience teaching defensive tactics, decided it was time for him to leave.He recalled a wide-eyed elderly couple in the office waiting room watching the exchange, and he said he feared for the bystanders’ safety. Mr Gaston turned to go.As he walked out of the cramped office, Mr Eklund drew his gun, trained it on Mr Gaston’s back and followed him. At one point, Mr Gaston said, Mr Eklund tried to arrest the uniformed officer.“He came around the corner with his weapon out, telling me, ‘you had your chance, you’re not going anywhere, I’m detaining you’,” Gaston said.“That’s when I was preparing myself to be shot. The hate and anger he had against me, I was getting ready to be shot by this security guard for no reason.”Mr Eklund, who could not be reached for comment, pleaded not guilty to one charge of aggravated menacing in a court appearance on Monday.Mr Gaston and his wife have also filed a lawsuit against Mr Eklund and the two security firms that apparently employed him.Representatives of those companies, Paragon Systems and Praetorian Shield, did not respond to requests for comment. The IRS declined to comment.The local news station WTVG published what it claims to be security camera footage of the interaction and The Washington Post obtained screenshots of the video.The images show Mr Gaston backing away and attempting to leave the building in an elevator. But Mr Eklund, gun still drawn, blocks the door with his foot.Mr Gaston says he felt cornered, scared. He took out his phone to take a picture of Mr Eklund, he said, and the security guard finally holstered his weapon.Heather Taylor, president of the Ethical Society of Police in St Louis, said that Mr Eklund behaved recklessly and likely would not have treated a white officer the same way.“We know what it’s like being an African American police officer in a city,” Ms Taylor said. “A lot of us realise that, hey, even though you’re in uniform, that doesn’t mean you’re safe.”The tense scene recalled other, infamous incidents with grisly endings. Ms Taylor pointed to the case of Jemel Roberson, a black security guard who was killed by a Midlothian, Illinois, police officer while they both responded to a shooting at the bar where Roberson worked.She also mentioned Detective Jacai Colson in Maryland, who was killed by a fellow officer while working undercover. Mr Colson, according to a lawsuit, had his badge in his hand and was shouting “Police! Police!” before he was killed.“You’re not given the benefit of the doubt as a minority,” Ms Taylor said. “It’s something we’ve been highlighting forever and now here’s another example of it.”She applauded Mr Gaston’s cool demeanour in the face of what she said was potentially lethal bigotry.Mr Gaston said he didn’t feel that Mr Eklund respected him as a law enforcement officer, and in more than three decades of police work has never dealt with anything like that.He was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder and severe depression, he said. He’s been on medical leave and is seeing a counsellor twice a week. The civil suit Mr Gaston and his wife filed seeks compensation.The standoff between Mr Gaston and Mr Eklund ended, he said, when Toledo police officers responded to a 911 call from inside the building that mentioned a man who has “got a gun” and “won’t leave”. The caller didn’t mention that the man was a police officer.When Toledo police arrived, Mr Gaston recounted, they told Mr Eklund: “You know he’s a uniformed deputy sheriff, right? We can go anywhere in this building we want.”Washington Post



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‘I didn’t want them to go’: Mother remembers father and daughter who drowned in Rio Grande

‘I didn’t want them to go’: Mother remembers father and daughter who drowned in Rio GrandeRosa Ramírez pleaded with her son, urging him not to leave El Salvador and head north with his wife and young daughter. The risks were simply too high.He saw no other choice. Their neighbourhood was controlled by a gang that enriched itself through drug-dealing, extortion and violence.But most pressing of all, Ms Ramírez said, they could barely make ends meet on their jobs at fast-food restaurants, and had pinned their hopes on making it to the United States.They never did.Last Sunday, after weeks on the road, Ms Ramírez’s son, Óscar Alberto Martínez Ramírez, 25, and his 23-month-old daughter, Angie Valeria, drowned while trying to cross from Mexico into Texas.Their fate, captured in a searing photograph of father and daughter lying face down in the muddy waters of the Rio Grande, her arm limply wrapped around him, has quickly become a focal point in the debate over the stream of migrants pushing towards the US border – and President Donald Trump’s determination to stop it.Critics of the president have taken up the case of the Martínez family, with Senator Chuck Schumer of New York calling the president’s policies “a whirlwind of incompetence, leading to pictures like this”.Mr Trump and his supporters, in turn, have accused Democrats of an inaction that has worsened the crisis, with Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky criticising them as being “uncooperative and uninterested in anything except political posturing”.But for many residents here in Mr Martínez’s hometown, San Martín, the heated political battle in Washington has barely registered, and President Trump’s repeated efforts to block migrants have had little impact on the decision to make the perilous journey.“He can say what he wants — that he’s going to put up a wall of I-don’t-know-how-many metres,” said José Alemán, 48, a partner in a local car washing business. “But they keep going.”The death of Mr Martínez and his daughter has given an urgent and poignant face to a major driver of migration from Central America and elsewhere: economic duress.Much attention in recent years has been given to the rampant violence that has compelled so many Salvadorans and residents of neighbouring Guatemala and Honduras to head north.But perhaps a bigger impetus, officials and residents here say, has been economics, especially poverty and the lack of good jobs.The Martínez family made it as far as the northern Mexican border city of Matamoros last weekend, where, according to relatives, they hoped to cross into the United States and apply for asylum.Told the bridge was closed, however, they decided to ford the Rio Grande on Sunday afternoon instead.Mr Martínez went ahead with the couple’s daughter, carrying her on his back, tucked under his T-shirt. His wife, Tania Vanessa Ávalos, followed behind, riding on the back of a family friend, she told Mexican officials.As Mr Martínez, carrying their daughter, approached the opposite bank, he was visibly tiring in the rough water, Ms Ávalos told the authorities. Unnerved, she decided to swim back to the Mexican side, but she saw her husband and daughter, close to the American riverbank, sink into the water and get swept away.“I didn’t want them to go,” Ms Ramírez, Martínez’s mother, said this week in an interview at the small, two-bedroom row house she had shared with her son and his family. “But they didn’t take my advice.”It remains unclear how the Martínez family intended to argue their case for asylum, or whether they even understood the legal basis for gaining such protection. Ms Ávalos did not respond to requests for an interview.But Mr Ramírez repeatedly said her son and his family were not fleeing persecution or the threat of it — requirements for gaining asylum in the United States.They migrated “only because of the economic situation”, she said. “Lamentably, the salaries here are very little and they aren’t enough,” she added, speaking softly.Mr Trump has railed against what he calls rampant asylum fraud, and he has imposed restrictions on the system in an effort to curb abuse — measures that human rights and migrants’ advocates say have imperilled the lives of asylum-seekers who have legitimate claims.Residents and officials here say a gang dominates the neighbourhood, Altavista.But Ms Ramírez and another relative said the immediate family had not been directly imperilled by the gang.Instead, like so many others here and throughout the working class of El Salvador, the family was struggling to get by, living on the edge of poverty.“There isn’t opportunity, there’s no work,” said Víctor Manuel Rivera, the mayor of San Martín. He estimated that about 50 per cent of the municipality’s residents with a high school degree are unemployed.“Every day I hear it: ‘I’m leaving for the United States’,” he said.People here talk about “la situación” — the situation — shorthand for the economic struggle many face. The counterpoint is often simple: “the American dream”.“It hasn’t occurred to me to leave for there,” said Salvador Humberto Andrade Torres, 59, a neighbour of the Martínez family, referring to the United States. “But it occurs to a lot of people.”Officials described the neighbourhood — indeed, the entire municipality of San Martín — as a de facto “bedroom community”, with many residents commuting on average about two hours each way to work in the capital, San Salvador.Mr Martínez and Ms Ávalos, however, worked relatively close to their home, family members said — she in a Chinese fast-food restaurant at a middle-class mall, and he at various branches of the Papa John’s pizza chain.But the couple, even though they were sharing household expenses with Ms Ramírez and her partner, were having a hard time on their salaries of about $ 300 (£236) a month.Last autumn, they started talking about migrating to the United States.Most of those who migrate are young, as has been the case for generations.But in recent years, the municipality has seen a sharp increase in the number of families migrating, too, part of a wave of family migration from Central America towards the United States.Ms Ramírez said she spoke with her son from time to time as the family made its northward trek, but he did not reveal many details.“I would ask him and he said, ‘We’re fine, we’re fine,’” she recalled.The farewell had been subdued. The family gathered for a simple, Sunday meal one afternoon last spring. Ms Ramírez prepared beef stew — “they love that”, she said.Several days later, as she headed to her night shift at the garment factory where she works, Ms Ramírez said one last goodbye to her son and his family.When she returned in the morning, they were gone.Ms Ramírez remembered her son as a loyal, doting father and “a responsible, friendly, respectful son”.Her granddaughter, Angie Valeria, Ms Ramírez recalled, was “happy, intelligent”.As she spoke, she sat on a worn sofa covered in a sheet decorated with the images of princesses from animated Disney films. A single bare light bulb illuminated the room, a few ceramic butterflies adorned the walls.After the bodies were discovered on Monday, Ms Ramírez found herself scrolling through the photos of her son and granddaughter on her phone. Her daughter eventually erased them to spare her the pain.“I would feel bad when I looked at them,” Ms Ramírez said.It is an agony that she hopes others will never have to suffer.“Don’t risk the lives of your children,” she said, hoping to warn others against setting off on the potentially dangerous journey to the American border. “Those who are thinking about this, don’t do it.”“I’d prefer to live here, in poverty, than risk my life,” she added. “But we don’t all think the same way.”The New York Times



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Thomas Roberts on Stonewall 50: ‘I Want LGBTQ Kids to Know It’s OK. It’s OK to Be Different, and OK to Be Gay’

Thomas Roberts on Stonewall 50: ‘I Want LGBTQ Kids to Know It’s OK. It’s OK to Be Different, and OK to Be Gay’Photo Illustration by Sarah Rogers/The Daily Beast / Photos GettyIn this special series, LGBT celebrities and public figures talk to Tim Teeman about the Stonewall Riots and their legacy—see more here.Thomas RobertsJournalistWhen/how did you first hear about the Stonewall Riots, and what did you make of them?I learned of the Stonewall Riots in 2006-2007. It was shortly after coming out publicly. I was utterly impressed at the bravery protesters showed. They put it all on the line for us.  The Stonewall Riots: What Really Happened, What Didn’t, and What Became MythWhat is their significance for you?Without Stonewall where would we be today? It was the spark.How far have we LGBT people come since 1969?Since 1969 we’ve come out of the shadows of shame and intolerance. In 50 years the LGBTQ community is a force to be reckon with, but we still have battles ahead. And it’s not solely on LGBTQ rights. We need to show up wherever people are marginalized and oppressed. We need to show up when we aren’t personally the sole beneficiaries.What would you like to see, LGBT-wise, in the next 50 years?I’d love to see an LGBTQ President. And I believe in my lifetime we just might. But in the meantime I want LGBTQ kids to know it’s OK. It’s OK to be different. It’s OK to be gay. The world is a big and wonderful place… eventually we all find our peace. However, it doesn’t come without ups and downs. There will be high highs and low lows. Keep going. It will all be OK. Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.



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‘I Still Have Nightmares’: Tortured Turpin Children Speak at Parents’ Sentencing in ‘House of Horrors’ Case

‘I Still Have Nightmares’: Tortured Turpin Children Speak at Parents’ Sentencing in ‘House of Horrors’ CaseDamian Dovarganes/ReutersThe children of David and Louise Turpin shared emotional statements in court Friday as their parents were sentenced to life in prison for torturing, starving, and holding them hostage for years.In February, the California couple pleaded guilty in Riverside County Superior Court to torture and dependent abuse as well as several counts of false imprisonment, child endangerment, and adult abuse in the “house of horrors” case that shocked the country. The abuse came to light in January 2018, when their 17-year-old daughter escaped from their Perris home and used her brother’s cellphone to call 911.“My parents took my whole life from me but now I’m taking my life back,” one of the couple’s 13 children, identified as Jane Doe 4, tearfully said in court. “I’m a fighter, I’m strong and I’m shooting through life like a rocket.”Before the hearing, the judge allowed the victims to speak under the guise of anonymity.“I’m in college now and living independently,” the daughter added. “I love hanging out with my friends and life is great. I believe everything happens for a reason. Life may have been bad, but it made me strong. I fought to become the person I am.”Prosecutors allege the Turpins abused 12 of their 13 children, routinely shackling, beating, and starving them in an act of torture and neglect so severe it stunted the growth of some of the kids. Two of the Turpin daughters are now unable to bear children as a result of the abuse. The siblings, who ranged in age from 2 to 29, were isolated from the outside world in their home about 60 miles outside of Los Angeles and were denied showers, medical care, and sometimes even food, prosecutors said. As punishment, the children were tied up for “weeks or even months at a time,” Riverside County District Attorney Mike Hestrin said.When authorities arrived to the house after the daughter’s call, she didn’t know what month it was or what the word medication meant. She claimed she hadn’t been bathed in months. “I cannot describe in words what we went through growing up. Sometimes I still have nightmares of things that had happened, such as my siblings being chained up or getting beaten. But that is the past and this is now,” one of the couple’s sons said Friday, adding that he loves his parents and now forgives them for “a lot of the things that they did to us.”On Friday, Superior Court Judge Bernard J. Schwartz sentenced the pair to life in prison with the possibility of parole after 25 years for their “selfish, cruel and inhumane” treatment, a ruling previously agreed upon with the Riverside County District Attorney’s Office. “The only reason your punishment is less than the maximum is that you took responsibility and spared your children the harm of reliving it,” Schwartz said in court. The parents had an opportunity to speak before the sentencing, each showing remorse for their actions and tearfully asking their children for forgiveness.“I’m sorry for everything I’ve done to hurt my children,” Louise Turpin said. “I love them more than they could ever imagine.”David Turpin broke down in tears before he addressed the court, prompting his attorney to read his hand-written statement, which expressed hope his children will “remain” close since their parents will “not be with them.” “I thank God for all of my children,” the father’s statement read, adding that he is sorry “if I’ve done anything to cause them harm.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast here



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Beto: ‘I Think There’s a Lot of Wisdom in’ Abolishing Electoral College

Beto: ‘I Think There’s a Lot of Wisdom in’ Abolishing Electoral CollegeBeto O'Rourke endorsed fellow Democratic presidential contender Elizabeth Warren's call for the abolition of the Electoral College during a Tuesday campaign stop in Pennsylvania.“I think there's a lot to that. Because you had an election in 2016 where the loser got 3 million more votes than the victor. It puts some states out of play altogether, they don't feel like their vote really counts,” O'Rourke told MSNBC's Garrett Haake when asked about Warren's opposition to the Electoral College. “So if we really want every person to vote and give them every reason to vote, we need to make sure their votes count and go to the candidate of their choosing. So I think there's a lot of wisdom to that and it's something we talked about during that last senate race in Texas.”> Asked about the idea of getting rid of the electoral college, Beto O’Rourke tells @GarrettHaake today: “I think there’s a lot of wisdom in that.” pic.twitter.com/k5yUiL2gmb> > — Kailani Koenig (@kailanikm) March 19, 2019O'Rourke's comments come one day after Warren, citing the outsize influence of voters in battleground states, advocated the abolition of the Electoral College during a Monday night CNN town hall.“My view is that every vote matters and the way we can make that happen is that we can have national voting, and that means get rid of the Electoral College,” Warren told the audience at Mississippi’s Jackson State University.The Massachusetts Democrat went on to accuse Republicans of seeking to disenfranchise minority communities through voter-ID laws and called for a constitutional amendment that “protects the right to vote for every American citizen and makes sure that vote gets counted.”The notion of the Electoral College as a means by which the votes of rural, white Americans enjoy greater influence than those cast by the diverse, urban majority has gained popularity among liberal lawmakers and activists since the 2016 election.The vast majority of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents (81 percent) prefer to maintain the status quo, while the same percentage of Democrats would like to see a constitutional amendment passed to transition to a national popular vote, according to a Gallup poll taken weeks after Election Day 2016.



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California dismantles its execution chamber as governor orders moratorium on death penalty: ‘I couldn’t sleep at night’

California dismantles its execution chamber as governor orders moratorium on death penalty: ‘I couldn’t sleep at night’California’s governor has signed a moratorium halting the use of the death penalty, saying he would be unable to sleep at night if he sent just one innocent person to their death. Gavin Newsom, who was sworn in as the state’s 40th governor in January, said statistics suggested at least one of the 737 inmates on California’s death row – more than any other state – ought not to be there. Citing a National Academy of Sciences report that estimated 1 out of every 25 people on death row was innocent, the governor said he was not prepared to go along with such a system.



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Severe turbulence leaves 30 passengers injured on Turkish Airlines flight to New York: ‘I saw blood all over’

Severe turbulence leaves 30 passengers injured on Turkish Airlines flight to New York: ‘I saw blood all over’Severe turbulence left 30 people injured and many passengers fearing for their lives on a flight from Istanbul to New York. Dozens of ambulances were called to New York’s John F Kennedy international airport after those on board the Turkish Airlines flight were tossed around the plane cabin during the unanticipated episode around 45 minutes before landing. Passengers said the turbulence was not announced and some people were not wearing their seatbelts at the time.



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Woman rages after being seated next to ‘big’ passengers on United Airlines plane: ‘I eat salad, okay?’

Woman rages after being seated next to ‘big’ passengers on United Airlines plane: ‘I eat salad, okay?’A woman was reportedly thrown off a flight after raging against “big” passengers she claimed she was wedged between in a middle seat. The outburst was filmed and later shared online by Norma Rodgers, one of the passengers on the receiving end of the woman’s insults, and has since been viewed more than one million times. Footage of the incident shows the passenger complaining about being seated between Ms Rodgers and a man she had been travelling with, named only as Mac.



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