Tag Archives: Heard

'We heard gasps of astonishment': Baby born at 9.11am on 9/11, weighing 9lbs 11oz

'We heard gasps of astonishment': Baby born at 9.11am on 9/11, weighing 9lbs 11ozHospital staff in the US say a baby was born on the anniversary of the 9/11 attacks at 9:11pm, weighing 9lb 11oz.The mother described her baby Christina, who arrived on September 11, as a “little miracle”.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Heard for miles: Gas explosion hits office, shopping complex

Heard for miles: Gas explosion hits office, shopping complexA powerful natural gas explosion badly damaged a Maryland office complex and shopping center Sunday morning, ripping away part of the facade and exposing twisted metal, authorities said. No injuries were reported in the thundering blast, which occurred at about 8 a.m. It came after authorities said they had evacuated the area around the complex because of a suspected early morning gas leak near the complex in Columbia, Maryland. “It was so powerful it could be heard in communities many miles away,” said Howard County Executive Calvin Ball in a statement.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Jeffrey Epstein: ‘Shrieking and yelling heard from cell’ on day of alleged sex trafficker’s death

Jeffrey Epstein: ‘Shrieking and yelling heard from cell’ on day of alleged sex trafficker’s deathShrieking and yelling were heard coming from Jeffrey Epstein‘s cell on the morning of his death, it has been reported.People nearby heard a commotion characterised as shouting, shrieking and yelling in a report by CBS News.The broadcaster cited unnamed sources, who added that guards at the Metropolitan Correctional Centre (MCC) in New York had tried to revive the alleged sex trafficker.“Breathe, Epstein, breathe,” they were reported as having said during the effort.It came as pressure mounted on prison authorities in the wake of Epstein’s apparent suicide on Saturday.Jerrold Nadler, the Democratic chairman of the House judiciary committee, sent a scathing letter to the acting director of federal prisons, complaining that the “competency and rigour of our criminal justice system has been marred”.Along with other politicians he demanded answers from Hugh Hurwitz on the prison’s suicide-prevention policies, information on the guards on duty and whether video cameras were in use.On Monday, Donald Trump‘s attorney general said he was angry and appalled to have learned of Epstein’s death and blasted the MCC for “serious irregularities”.William Barr added that the investigation into Epstein’s alleged sex-trafficking activities would continue and that “any co-conspirators should not rest easy”.MCC has also been criticised for low staffing levels and failing to make regular checks on Epstein, according to an official who was not authorised to speak on the matter.Mr Barr has asked the Justice Department’s internal watchdog to investigate Epstein’s death.The former financier was already a registered sex offender, having pleaded guilty in 2008 to Florida state charges of unlawfully paying a teenage girl for sex.Additional reporting by agencies



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Lawyer: Family never heard suspect express racist views

Lawyer: Family never heard suspect express racist viewsAs funerals were held Thursday in Mexico for some of the country’s citizens who died in the El Paso shooting, a lawyer for the suspected gunman’s family said they never heard him express racist views. Authorities believe 21-year-old Patrick Crusius wrote a racist, rambling screed that railed against mass immigration before opening fire last weekend at a Walmart. Crusius lived near Dallas, and El Paso police say he drove more than 10 hours to the largely Latino border city in Texas to carry out the shooting that killed 22 people and wounded about two dozen others.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Joe Biden ‘Never Heard’ Julian Castro’s Border Ideas When They Served Under Obama

Joe Biden ‘Never Heard’ Julian Castro’s Border Ideas When They Served Under ObamaJim Watson/AFP/GettyDuring Wednesday night’s CNN debate showdown, former Vice President Joe Biden jousted with one of Obama’s Cabinet members over the president’s legacy. It came when former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro called for ending the criminalization of unauthorized border crossings. Then moderator Don Lemon noted that the Obama administration deported almost 800,000 people in the first two years of his presidency. Would deportation numbers go up under Biden?“Absolutely not,” Biden retorted. “I found that the secretary, we sat together in many meetings, I never heard him talk about any of this when he was the secretary.”Then protests broke out, and Biden grinned in silence for a few moments until things calmed down.“We’re in a circumstance where if you say you can just cross the border, what do you say to all of those people around the world who want the same thing, to come to the United States, and make the case that they have to wait in line?” Biden continued. “The fact of the matter is, you should be able to—if you cross the border illegally, you should be able—it’s a crime.”“People should have to get in line,” Biden added. “That’s the problem.”Castro didn’t let the topic drop. “First, Mr. Vice President, it looks like one of us has learned the lessons of the past administration, and one of us hasn’t,” he said. And to be sure, Castro did criticize the Obama administration’s immigration stance during Obama’s presidency. Then New York Mayor Bill de Blasio joined the pile-on.“I didn’t hear whether you tried to stop them or not using your power in the White House,” he said. “Did you think it was a good idea or something that needed to be stopped?”Biden then pointed to Obama’s move to offer temporary deportation relief—known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA—to undocumented people who came to the U.S. as children. And he snapped at de Blasio for comparing President Trump and Obama. “I think it is absolutely bizarre,” the former vice president said. The immigration tiff culminated with New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker taking a final shot at the ex-V.P.“First of all, you can’t have it both ways,” he said. “You invoke President Obama more than anybody in this campaign. You can’t do it when it’s convenient and dodge it when it’s not.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Rep Ilhan Omar’s Constituents on Trump’s Go Home Taunt: We’ve Heard it Before

Rep Ilhan Omar’s Constituents on Trump’s Go Home Taunt: We’ve Heard it BeforeTom Williams/GettyMINNEAPOLIS—They’ve been told to go home in grocery stores. On the way to pick up lunch at McDonald’s. On a highway overpass and in school playgrounds. Even while wearing the uniform of the U.S. military. For many residents of Minnesota’s 5th Congressional District, President Donald Trump’s repeated attacks on four minority Democratic members of Congress—which culminated in him telling them to go back to where they came from and goading supporters into echoing that call—amounted to much more than the latest race-centered controversy sparked by the White House. Much more, too, than an attack on their very own representative in Washington, Ilhan Omar, a first-year Democratic lawmaker.In lobbing that racist taunt at Omar, Trump also directed it at many of her constituents—because many of them have heard it themselves countless times.Saciido Shaie, a 36-year-old community advocate who left Somalia as a child, recalls going places with her three children—all born in the U.S.—only to be met by strangers telling them to “go back to where you came from” or scoffing, “I hate your kind.”“His attack on Ilhan, on immigrants, is actually attacking me and my kids,” she told The Daily Beast in an interview. “Ilhan will not go back. I wouldn’t go back. Where do I go? I don’t know anything about Somalia. I don’t know where my home would be.”“When I see or hear people asking me to go back home, like—I am home.”This district, which includes the city of Minneapolis and some surrounding suburbs, is home to one of the biggest and most vibrant Muslim and East African disapora communities in the country. Most came from Somalia and Ethiopia during violent civil wars in those countries in the 1980s and 1990s. Now, many are naturalized U.S. citizens raising Minnesota-born children.How the Ilhan Omar Marriage Smear Went From Fever Swamp to TrumpThe 37-year old Omar, who fled Somalia at age 14 and settled in Minnesota with her family, is not only the district’s duly elected representative in Congress but a powerful symbol of the experience of East Africans, particularly Muslim ones, in America. Her rapid ascent to political prominence, her seat in the U.S. House, and her far-reaching public profile are to many emblematic of their assimilation into the political and social fabric of the United States.Of course, this community is hardly a monolith: sit for the near-constant political gab sessions in the coffee shops and community centers in East African neighborhoods and it’s clear not everyone agrees with Omar on the issues. Some wish she would tone down her fiery style, which seems to constantly generate controversy. Some deeply hate Trump, while others are ambivalent about him, and others still admit they know someone who thought about voting for him. But in questioning Omar’s fundamental Americanness, people here say, Trump questioned theirs—increasing their fear that the president is emboldening expressions of racism that have always threatened immigrants and people of color in America. Some say that two years of the Trump presidency has already fomented an increase in racial strife that they can feel. ‘Tell Them to Leave’: Trump Sics Rally Crowd on ‘The Squad’“It’s an attack on all of us,” said Ahmed Yusuf, an author born in Somalia who has been in Minnesota for two decades. He revealed a dark worry that was raised by several community members in conversations with The Daily Beast in Minneapolis on Friday: that the president’s attacks on Omar—which included a “send her back!” crowd chant at a Trump rally in North Carolina on Wednesday—might lead to violence against Omar and others who look and pray like her. “An idiot who takes it as a call to arms and harms someone,” said Yusuf.While Trump has in the last week targeted four first-year lawmakers of color with racist language, Omar—the only one not born in the U.S. and the only one who wears a hijab—has borne the brunt of it. At several public appearances, the president has gone after her criticism of the state of Israel, which has sometimes featured anti-Semitic tropes that have offended many Jews, as proof she virulently hates not only Israel but the Jewish people. Trump also continues to falsely declare that she is an al Qaeda sympathizer. His repeated attacks on Omar have perhaps also given him the opportunity to return to one of his favorite targets from even before he became president, when he referred to refugees in Minnesota as a “problem” and scheduled a rally in Minneapolis days before the 2016 election to lament that the state had “suffered enough” because of them.Trump’s sustained, weeklong Omar diatribe has consumed the community in the past week, said Shaie, who is known locally for her work running a program for Somali youth called the Ummah Project. She is also active in Democratic politics; In 2018, she canvassed for Omar. “This is all we talk about,” she said. “It’s become exhausting to the point where you don't even care anymore.” Sometimes, people gather around TVs and try to find the comedy in Trump’s repeated jeers. Other times, it’s more somber. “I hear my own kids asking me,” she said, “why Donald Trump doesn't like us?”On Friday afternoon, CNN’s coverage of a fresh Trump attack on Omar blared on a TV in a coffee and tea stall in Karmel Mall, a shopping center where Somalis gather to eat, talk, and drink hot tea. Young men, fresh from Friday prayer services, were fixed on a different TV showing a soccer match between Algeria and Senegal. But Mahad Farhan, a 33-year-old truck driver from Minneapolis, was watching Trump. “I’ve never listened to any president more than him,” he said. “I want to understand how he carries himself.”Farhan left Somalia when he was young and grew up in Owatonna, a small town in the cornfields of southern Minnesota. He’s experienced racism, at times violently. He told of an incident when his big rig was stopped by another car on a highway somewhere in Indiana, when the other driver, who was white, got out with a gun, hurling racist epithets and telling him to go home. But Farhan calls Minnesota home and believes most people here are good, welcoming people. He is flummoxed by Trump, but has come to believe he is issuing racist attacks as part of his re-election strategy. “I don’t know if he’s racist,” he said. “I don’t talk to the guy, but it might be a question when the whole world thinks you’re racist.”To Jaylani Hussein, the executive director of the Minnesota chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, Trump’s broadsides are “the manifestation of Islamophobia.” This week, he told The Daily Beast, he and fellow CAIR activists were shouted at to “go home” while hanging a “Stand with Ilhan” banner on a highway overpass in the city. “I personally also believe the rise of troll-ism, the rise of anonymity in racism, these are real people who are using anonymity to go after other people,” he said. “We've had that historically, yeah, but we are at a high level. So with all of that happening, it's just something that Trump sees every single day, the more he pokes it, the more he turns away from the real issue.”Some here have dealt with the controversy by focusing on the acts of kindness and generosity extended in these tense times. Abdirizak Bihi, a Somali community leader in Minneapolis who arrived in the city in 1996, said in the past week all kinds of people have reached out to express solidarity and ask what they might offer to help. A diverse crew of Omar supporters and constituents showed up to greet the congresswoman at the airport when she returned from D.C. on Thursday. “We find more support from the community than actual problems,” said Bihi, sitting in a Starbucks in the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood that is the heart of the city’s East African population. “We have great neighbors in Minnesota.”Bihi, like many Somali and Muslim leaders here, has known Omar long before her days as an international political figure, which began in earnest when she upset a longtime Democratic state lawmaker in 2016 to become the first female Somali-American member of a legislature in the country. “I’ve known her for a long time. She’s a very strong lady,” he said. “She’s getting more support than ever before.”Bihi believes that Omar, and the community she has come to symbolize, will not only endure Trump’s attacks but become better because of them. “These types of incidents create fear, but for the East African culture, it creates a springboard to rebound,” he said. “We’ve had a lot of challenges: fleeing war, raising families, so many challenges.”Indeed, many immigrants are old enough to remember the civil wars that devastated Somalia. Shaie is one of them, and while it gives her and others perspective on the current drama gripping their community, those memories make them wonder what their own children will carry with them from this moment in America.“They love America, never questioned their existence in this country, now they’re getting more traumatized,” she said. “All they know is Minnesota. Because they were born in Minnesota… Regardless of what happened, we’re not going anywhere. If you don’t like us, that’s up to you.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Frustration builds for Boeing Max plane crash families as they fight to have lawsuits heard in US courts

Frustration builds for Boeing Max plane crash families as they fight to have lawsuits heard in US courtsHuman remains and personal belongings were still scattered across the site of the Ethiopian Airlines crash a month after it happened, a relative of one of the victims has claimed.  The London-based relative, whose sister died in the crash, told The Telegraph she was "horrified" to discover "what appeared to be an arm and a fragment of bone" when she visited the spot where 157 people lost their lives in March. She shared photographs showing children's shoes and other personal effects lying uncollected on the ground, taken 28 days after the tragedy, she said.  The relative, who does not want to be identified, also claimed the site wasn't properly secured with gaps in the perimeter allowing people and animals to "freely pass by" where the tragedy took place.  "We're still barely managing to believe what's happened but on top of the tragedy to have also no respect at all to the families and the victims and have those items left on the land… it's outrageous," she said.   The photos shared with The Telegraph show clothes and other personal belongings at the crash site The claims raise serious questions about how the Ethiopian authorities have managed the aftermath of the tragedy and whether the investigation is as thorough as it could be.  Contacted by this newspaper, the Ethiopian embassies in both the UK and the US declined to comment.  The horror has added to a build up of frustration among victims' families following the two recent airline tragedies involving the Boeing 737 Max plane. Victims of Indonesia's Lion Air crash, the first of the two involving the model, have launched legal action against the American aviation manufacturer for the wrongful death of their loved ones.   Among them is Rini Soegiyono, whose younger sister Niar, 39, was killed along with her state prosecutor husband Andri Wiranofa, 41, on the flight on October 29.  Ms Soegiyono, 52, who has been left to raise her nieces, aged just 11 and seven, believes Boeing owes her family and the others taking legal action an explanation for what went wrong.  "The world is also waiting so it is important to know so that it will not happen again. We don’t want any other family to have to go through what we are going through,” she told The Telegraph.  “We screamed, we screamed to the world. We had no experience before, we never thought that it will happen to us, to our family… because at that time, Boeing said that the plane is safe.”   The growing number of Indonesian litigants are now fighting for the right to have their cases heard in US courts, rather than in Indonesia, where victim compensation is likely to be much lower. A decision on whether that right will be granted is imminent.  Divers recovered the black box from the wreckage of the Lion Air plane Credit: Adek Berry/AFP An apology issued earlier this month by Dennis Muilenburg, Boeing’s CEO, for the double tragedy, and his admission that a preliminary investigation into the Ethiopian crash revealed that both incidents involved similar errors in automated flight systems, gave victims’ families renewed hopes for justice.  But Brian Kabateck, a high-profile California-based lawyer working on behalf of a dozen Indonesian families including Ms Soegiyono’s, said that Boeing owes the crash victims “much more than sympathy,” adding: “They deserve their day in a United States courtroom.” Lion Air flight 610 disappeared from the radar screens 12 minutes after take-off and all 189 passengers and crew were lost. Less than five months later, on March 10, a second Boeing 737 Max jet, Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, nosedived into a field six minutes after take-off from Addis Ababa leaving no survivors.  Even after the second crash, Boeing insisted that the 737 MAX was safe, and “was willing to continue to gamble with the lives of the flying public” while furiously working behind the scenes on a software fix, Mr Kabateck alleged.  Boeing declined to comment on the current litigation, referring The Telegraph to general public statements on its website.   For the families of the Ethiopian Airlines victims, the ordeal continues as they await reassurances that everything possible has been done to recover the personal belongings of their loved ones. More than 150 people were killed in the Ethiopian Airlines crash Credit: Eduardo Soteras/AFP The relative said she travelled to the crash site on April 7, almost a month after the tragedy, to be put at ease that the site had been thoroughly excavated after seeing pictures of chaotic scenes in the media.  But to her dismay, she claimed the area was not properly secured and victims' belongings had been left unattended and exposed to the elements.  She described the personal horror of flicking through the debris looking for a trace of her sister, a young aid worker.  "I spent almost two hours looking for anything belonging to my sister and that's the last thing I would wish for anybody. I literally searched every single spot to find something pertaining to her," she told The Telegraph.  "We found what we believe to be remains of human bones, which were then handed over to the guards in a military tent, just outside the site of the crash," she said. She added that to her shock the guards simply used a plastic bag lying on the ground to remove them, ignoring the "minimum standards and procedures" typically applied to the scene of a fatal accident. "I'm concerned that for them [the authorities] the search is finished. It is distressing to see that all the items that can mean the world to a suffering family are still on the ground, just waiting to be collected rather than being searched for," she said.   "There's a risk for the families of not retrieving anything from their loved ones' belongings."



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

He grew up in West Africa. He never heard of MS-13. Then he fled to the U.S. — and ICE accused him of being a gang member

He grew up in West Africa. He never heard of MS-13. Then he fled to the U.S. — and ICE accused him of being a gang memberYoumbi Roberto Nfor flew from Africa to Ecuador, then embarked on a grueling and dangerous journey to the United States, where he planned to request asylum.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Police called after man heard shouting death threats … at a spider

Police called after man heard shouting death threats ... at a spiderOn Wednesday morning in Perth, Western Australia, a bystander heard a man inside a property repeatedly shouting the words “why don’t you die,” with the sounds of a toddler screaming in the background. It turns out the man was only trying to kill a spider. Western Australian Police posted a screenshot of the interaction on Twitter, however, the tweet was later deleted as officers aren’t meant to screenshot police systems.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

US judge says Obamacare can stand while appeal is heard

US judge says Obamacare can stand while appeal is heardA US judge who ruled earlier this month that Obamacare is unconstitutional has said the health care law can stand while his decision is appealed. Opposition Democrats, who have seen the law survive previous legal and legislative attacks, view it as a signature achievement of former president Barack Obama. Republicans on the other hand dismiss it as governmental overreach and President Donald Trump made repealing the law a key part of his campaign platform.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines