Tag Archives: Hawaii&aposs

Is Hawaii's Kilauea volcano shooting green gems into the air?

Is Hawaii's Kilauea volcano shooting green gems into the air?Embedded in the lava still spewing some 130 feet into the air from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano are green crystals.  Called olivine, these minerals can turn Hawaiian beaches green, and it appears some of the green gems are raining down upon homes near the eruption or popping up near lava flows. "Yes, the lava that is erupting now is very crystal-rich and it is quite possible that residents might be finding olivine," Cheryl Gansecki, a geologist at the University of Hawaii-Hilo that studies the composition of Kilauea's lava, said over email.  SEE ALSO: Lava transforms a Hawaiian bay into a blackened peninsula "It can be carried in the pumice [rapidly cooled lava] pieces that have been rained all over the area," she noted, or left behind when weaker lava rocks are crushed by cars or foot traffic.  U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientist Wendy Stovall, who was out studying Kilauea last week, also confirmed that recent lava samples do contain olivine, though she didn't happen upon any separated green crystals herself.  Other folks in the area, however, appear to be collecting the tiny green gems as they see them: Friends of mine live in Hawaii, right next to the area impacted by the most recent lava flows. In the midst of the destruction nearby & stress of the unknown, they woke up to this – tiny pieces of olivine all over the ground. It is literally raining gems. Nature is truly amazing. pic.twitter.com/inJWxOp66t — Erin Jordan (@ErinJordan_WX) June 11, 2018 Some olivines that popped out of an a'a flow. Kilauea's little gems. #hawaii #kilauea #olivine #lovevolcanoes t.co/1X2ACcWu7n pic.twitter.com/8UaA1IrKEd — GEOetc (@GEOetc2) June 10, 2018 It's certainly not unusual to find olivine crystals in most any Hawaiian lava rock, both new and ancient.  "It's pretty common," Stovall said in an interview. "There’s often olivine in rocks all over Hawaii." And this olivine can become completely separated from lava rocks in a variety of ways. Sometimes the crystals can be simply weathered out from old lava rocks. Or, in the case of green-tinged Hawaiian beaches, lava can erupt through ocean water in steamy, explosive events, breaking the lava into smaller pieces and fast-tracking the separation process, said Stovall.  Small green olivine crystals on a Big Island beach.Image: Stanley MertzmanBut in the case of this olivine presumably falling down on property near the eruption, the crystals "just kind of fall out" as lava is spewed into the air, said Stovall. "The olivine crystals folks are finding on the ground scattered about are from violently ejected basalt [a type of lava] blobs wherein the embedded, earlier-formed olivine crystals are freed from their surrounding pahoehoe [syrupy lava] basalt liquid," Stanley Mertzman, a volcanologist at Franklin and Marshall College, said over email. Both violent ejections on land and from lava flowing into the ocean can "produce freed individual olivine crystals that people can pick up any time," said Mertzman. Olivine crystals embedded in a Hawaiian lava rock.Image: Stanley MertzmanThe crystals may be flying through the air from exploded bits of lava, but it's unlikely they're also coming from the volcano's summit, where there's been a large plume of steam and ash erupting from the crater — and at times rare, explosive eruptions.  "One thing I can say is that olivine is not raining out of the plume," Michael Poland, a USGS volcanologist, said over email. Poland added that olivine is common on the ground regardless, because roads in Hawaii are made up of ground up olivine-rich lava rock. A June 6 plume from Kilauea's crater, Halema‘uma‘u.Image: usgsThe little crystals, however, are not being created during the eruption. They've been formed deep underground long ago, brewing in the molten rock.  "It really is one of the first things to form," said Stovall.  And olivine might not be the only crystal falling down inside the nearby neighborhood. "It's possible that other crystals are being found," said Stovall, adding that a USGS rock specialist said olivine is difficult to tell apart from another common crystal, called clinopyroxene. It's also quite possible nearby islanders will continue to find semi-translucent crystals on the ground. The eruption, over a month old now, shows no signs of relenting, and could very well last months — or longer.
Update 6/12/18 at 8 p.m. EST: This story was updated to include comments from geologist Cheryl Gansecki. WATCH: These trees have lived for 2,500 years. Now they're suddenly dying  



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Hawaii's Erupting Volcano Looks Even Crazier From Space at Night

Hawaii's Erupting Volcano Looks Even Crazier From Space at NightSee the incredible image



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Satellites in space see lava pouring from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano

Satellites in space see lava pouring from Hawaii's Kilauea volcanoFrom the ground, lava pouring from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano can look terrifying.  Over the past few weeks, newly cracked fissures in the ground have allowed fountains and pools of molten rocket to well up to the surface, destroying homes and other structures in the area surrounding the active volcano.  SEE ALSO: An astronaut saw Hawaii's Kilauea volcano erupting from space. And he took a picture. But from space, those fissures and lava flows take on a new look.  #Kilauea lava channels are clearly visible in this #Sentinel2 B image of the #Hawaii volcano from 23 May (crop and full image). Follow @USGSVolcanoes for updates. pic.twitter.com/ZSCeL81xEB — ESA (@esa) May 25, 2018 The European Space Agency's Sentinel 2 B satellite snapped a photo of Kilauea from above on May 23, showing off the bright lava channels bringing the molten rock up to the Big Island's surface.  One of the most amazing parts of this image is the scale it provides. From space, the viewer can really get a sense of how small of an area is being affected by the lava flowing from Kilauea. Other images taken from space also provide a new perspective.  Lava by night.Image: NASA Earth Observatory Lava looks like lines of neon light cutting through darkness near the Leilani Estates neighborhood near Kilauea in a photo taken by NASA's Landsat 8 satellite on May 23.  NASA has also been tracking the lava flowing from the volcano from space.  The images help people on the ground track volcanic activity and warn the public when people might be in danger.  A red alert has been issued after explosions from #Hawaii's Kilauea volcano intensified. Сlouds of volcanic ash rise in the air at 3.7 thousand meters, that's why it is easy to see even from the @Space_Station . pic.twitter.com/wFwMK6oQN7 — Anton Shkaplerov (@Anton_Astrey) May 17, 2018 Crewmembers on the International Space Station have also been able to monitor Kilauea from above, snapping photos from the orbiting laboratory's huge windows.  "Сlouds of volcanic ash rise in the air at 3.7 thousand meters, that's why it is easy to see even from the @Space_Station," space station cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov wrote on Twitter. WATCH: Mayon volcano erupts, leading to evacuation of over 56,000



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Hawaii's Erupting Kilauea Volcano Is Now Spouting Blue Flames of Burning Methane

Hawaii's Erupting Kilauea Volcano Is Now Spouting Blue Flames of Burning MethaneThe volcano produces methane when hot lava buries and burns plants and trees



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How Hawaii's Kīlauea Volcano eruption compares to others around the world

How Hawaii's Kīlauea Volcano eruption compares to others around the worldHawaii Island’s Kīlauea Volcano has been in a fit of rage since erupting in early May, spewing toxic gas, hurling boulders from its summit and cracking open more than 20 fissures.



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Lava From Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano Is Sending Shards of Glass Into the Sky

Lava From Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano Is Sending Shards of Glass Into the SkyThe Earth's natural chemistry is relentless.



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6 oddly mesmerizing live videos of lava gushing from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano

6 oddly mesmerizing live videos of lava gushing from Hawaii's Kilauea volcanoLike moths to a flame, humans are frequently most attracted to what we know is dangerous. And there is no better example of this than the strange, alluring beauty of the lava spewing from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano this May. On May 4, fissures along the east of Hawaii's Kilauea volcano ripped opened, releasing bubbling lava onto the landscape. It was just the first of many fissures that would rupture over the month and could continue for months to come. On May 17, an explosive blast erupted from Kilauea. SEE ALSO: An astronaut saw Hawaii's Kilauea volcano erupting from space. And he took a picture. On Saturday, officials reported the first known injury after Kilauea's eruption, when lava splatter hit a man standing on his balcony.
The Washington Post followed up on Monday with report that dozens of homes have been destroyed as lava pours out of fissures along Kilauea's rift zone. And in addition to contact with lava or lava splatter, residents must also beware of laze, toxic gas filled with glass and acid that results when lava meets the ocean. But somehow, even with the danger that lava brings, watching the fiery substance surge, bubble, and burst (from a safe distance of course) can be calming, peaceful, and, dare we say it, beautiful. Here are six oddly mesmerizing live streams of lava from Kilauea that you won't be able to look away from. 1. Lava spews from Hawaii volcano in Pahoa, Hawaii CNN's Tuesday live stream of the blast lava in Hawaii is a study in color.  For five hours, the network hosted a Facebook Live of Kilauea's lava spouting into the air. But as the bright orange flames dye the Hawaiian night sky with an orange hue, it's hard not to get lost into the fearsome display of the scene in Pahoa. 2. Kilauea lava flow activity in Lower Puna, Hawaii You've never seen a sunrise like this. On Monday, the Honolulu Civil Beat uploaded a live stream showing Kilauea's lava activity in Lower Puna, Hawaii as the sun rises and day breaks. The stream is a little over five hours, which means users can watch the sky go from night to day, all while the lava flow remains constant in the background. One of the most serene parts of the video is actually at the start of the live stream, when a rooster crows, birds chirp, and thunder claps while the lava continues its fearsome display in the background.  TBH, it's like listening to soothing ambient nature sounds but with a terrifying twist. 3. Lava spews from kilauea fissure in Hawaii On Monday, NBC News Affiliate KHNL offered yet another serene look at the volcanic activity in Hawaii with a roughly two hour live stream (with some breaks) of lava from Kilauea.  Over the course of the stream, the camera cuts to different angles of the lava, providing both a sense of scale of the eruption and its effects on the Hawaiian landscape. 4. Kilauea Lava Erupting In Lower Puna On Thursday night and into Friday morning, the Honolulu Civil Beat live-streamed lava from Kilauea shooting into the air in Lower Puna.  But what's notable about the stream is its framing. The video opens with the black backdrop of night, but in the center of the video, shining like a beacon, is Kilauea's lava gushing into the air. The result is a live stream that feels oddly cozy, like that feeling you get when sitting around a campfire at night. 5. Kilauea Lava Flow Fissure 16 On May 14, days before Kilauea's first explosive blast, the Honolulu Civil Beat uploaded a video showing lava activity at a fissure along the volcano.  Over the course of 14 minutes, users are treated to a close up, high-definition peek at Kilauea's lava spurting and oozing into the air. But the visible details of the lava, like the molten rock's ridged-looking edges as it gushes into the air, somehow makes the display calming rather than frightening, like ASMR but with flames. 6. Inside Halema‘uma‘u  Lava Lake Lava doesn't need to be cascading into the air for it to be beautiful.  On May 9, the Honolulu Civil Beat shared a video, curtesy of the United States Geological Survey, of a lava lake in the Halema‘uma‘u crater on Kilauea. Though only 39 seconds, the video gives brief yet unforgettable glimpse at the bubbling lava pooled inside the volcano, a notable contrast to the volcanic blasts we typically think of when we imagine lava. So yes, lava is dangerous. But, if you can find the right view, it can also be meditative too. WATCH: Get lost watching this mesmerizing lava gush and cool



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6 oddly mesmerizing live videos of lava gushing from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano

6 oddly mesmerizing live videos of lava gushing from Hawaii's Kilauea volcanoLike moths to a flame, humans are frequently most attracted to what we know is dangerous. And there is no better example of this than the strange, alluring beauty of the lava spewing from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano this May. On May 4, fissures along the east of Hawaii's Kilauea volcano ripped opened, releasing bubbling lava onto the landscape. It was just the first of many fissures that would rupture over the month and could continue for months to come. On May 17, an explosive blast erupted from Kilauea. SEE ALSO: An astronaut saw Hawaii's Kilauea volcano erupting from space. And he took a picture. On Saturday, officials reported the first known injury after Kilauea's eruption, when lava splatter hit a man standing on his balcony.
The Washington Post followed up on Monday with report that dozens of homes have been destroyed as lava pours out of fissures along Kilauea's rift zone. And in addition to contact with lava or lava splatter, residents must also beware of laze, toxic gas filled with glass and acid that results when lava meets the ocean. But somehow, even with the danger that lava brings, watching the fiery substance surge, bubble, and burst (from a safe distance of course) can be calming, peaceful, and, dare we say it, beautiful. Here are six oddly mesmerizing live streams of lava from Kilauea that you won't be able to look away from. 1. Lava spews from Hawaii volcano in Pahoa, Hawaii CNN's Tuesday live stream of the blast lava in Hawaii is a study in color.  For five hours, the network hosted a Facebook Live of Kilauea's lava spouting into the air. But as the bright orange flames dye the Hawaiian night sky with an orange hue, it's hard not to get lost into the fearsome display of the scene in Pahoa. 2. Kilauea lava flow activity in Lower Puna, Hawaii You've never seen a sunrise like this. On Monday, the Honolulu Civil Beat uploaded a live stream showing Kilauea's lava activity in Lower Puna, Hawaii as the sun rises and day breaks. The stream is a little over five hours, which means users can watch the sky go from night to day, all while the lava flow remains constant in the background. One of the most serene parts of the video is actually at the start of the live stream, when a rooster crows, birds chirp, and thunder claps while the lava continues its fearsome display in the background.  TBH, it's like listening to soothing ambient nature sounds but with a terrifying twist. 3. Lava spews from kilauea fissure in Hawaii On Monday, NBC News Affiliate KHNL offered yet another serene look at the volcanic activity in Hawaii with a roughly two hour live stream (with some breaks) of lava from Kilauea.  Over the course of the stream, the camera cuts to different angles of the lava, providing both a sense of scale of the eruption and its effects on the Hawaiian landscape. 4. Kilauea Lava Erupting In Lower Puna On Thursday night and into Friday morning, the Honolulu Civil Beat live-streamed lava from Kilauea shooting into the air in Lower Puna.  But what's notable about the stream is its framing. The video opens with the black backdrop of night, but in the center of the video, shining like a beacon, is Kilauea's lava gushing into the air. The result is a live stream that feels oddly cozy, like that feeling you get when sitting around a campfire at night. 5. Kilauea Lava Flow Fissure 16 On May 14, days before Kilauea's first explosive blast, the Honolulu Civil Beat uploaded a video showing lava activity at a fissure along the volcano.  Over the course of 14 minutes, users are treated to a close up, high-definition peek at Kilauea's lava spurting and oozing into the air. But the visible details of the lava, like the molten rock's ridged-looking edges as it gushes into the air, somehow makes the display calming rather than frightening, like ASMR but with flames. 6. Inside Halema‘uma‘u  Lava Lake Lava doesn't need to be cascading into the air for it to be beautiful.  On May 9, the Honolulu Civil Beat shared a video, curtesy of the United States Geological Survey, of a lava lake in the Halema‘uma‘u crater on Kilauea. Though only 39 seconds, the video gives brief yet unforgettable glimpse at the bubbling lava pooled inside the volcano, a notable contrast to the volcanic blasts we typically think of when we imagine lava. So yes, lava is dangerous. But, if you can find the right view, it can also be meditative too. WATCH: Get lost watching this mesmerizing lava gush and cool



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Lava From Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano Has Reached the Pacific Ocean and It's Creating a New Danger

Lava From Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano Has Reached the Pacific Ocean and It's Creating a New DangerThe mix of lava and seawater has created steam laced with hydrochloric acid and fine glass particles that can cause breathing problems



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Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano Shares a Deep Link with Neighboring Mauna Loa

Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano Shares a Deep Link with Neighboring Mauna LoaAccording to some scientists, that's probably a good thing.



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