Tag Archives: Fourth

Harvey Weinstein: fourth accuser opts out of settlement to pursue own claim

Harvey Weinstein: fourth accuser opts out of settlement to pursue own claimExclusive: Dominique Huett says settlement amount ‘not very fair’ and joins growing list of women to reject proposed dealA controversial proposed settlement between Harvey Weinstein and alleged victims of his sexual misconduct faces further delays, as a fourth accuser opts out and several others plan to object.Dominique Huett will remove herself from the settlement in order to pursue her own claim against the movie mogul, the Guardian can reveal. At least two other accusers have retained lawyers to file formal objections to the deal.Last month, it was reported that Weinstein and more than 30 women had reached a tentative deal following two years of negotiations.However, the Guardian has learned that a settlement hearing that was due before Weinstein’s criminal trial in New York has been postponed until at least February. It is not known if this was due to the growing number of women opting out.Huett joins three others who have decided to not be a part of the agreement: Wedil David, Kaja Sokola and Alexandra Canosa.Huett told the Guardian: “Originally I thought it was the best option for everyone, but after finding out more details, I think that opting out is the best way to get a better deal for me and for everyone.”Under the proposed deal, Weinstein would not have to pay a penny or admit any wrongdoing. The settlement would be paid by insurance companies representing the producer’s former studio, the Weinstein Company. More than $ 12m – a quarter of the overall package – would go towards legal costs for Weinstein and his board.“I feel the settlement amount is not very fair for all victims and the way it is structured really benefits the defendants a lot more than us,” Huett said. “I want to opt out to set a precedent for others and say that this settlement is not just.”> The settlement is not very fair and benefits the defendants more than us> > Dominique HuettHuett has retained a new attorney, Douglas Wigdor, who represents two others who have opted out. Wigdor believes the $ 500,000 Huett was offered was “not fair”. “I think Dominique’s case is worth significantly more than this,” he said.Wigdor will take on Huett’s claim, which was filed in a California court in October 2017, under sex trafficking laws. She was the first alleged Weinstein victim to file a civil claim and unlike many other accusers has a case within the statute of limitations.Huett alleges that in 2010, Weinstein invited her to the Peninsula Beverly Hills hotel in Los Angeles for a business meeting. She says he forced oral sex on her then masturbated, telling her it was a right of passage to a career in Hollywood.“He wouldn’t take no for an answer,” she said. “I refused and said no but was so shocked and paralysed by fear that I froze.“It’s devastating to think that what he did to me had happened to so many other actresses in the years before and that if his company had acted when they first learnt of his behaviour, it would never have happened to me.”Weinstein has denied any claim, criminal or civil, of non-consensual sex.The proposed settlement with some of his alleged victims is part of a $ 47m deal aimed at paying Weinstein Company debts. Of this sum, around $ 6.2m would go to 18 accusers who filed cases in the US, Canada and the UK. Approximately $ 18.5m is thought to be set aside for class-action participants, more of whom are expected. Board members of the Weinstein Company would be protected from liability.Zelda Perkins and Rowena Chiu have also retained Wigdor to file objections to the deal, the Guardian has learned. Kevin Mintzer is also counsel for Huett, Perkins, and Chiu.Perkins and Chiu, Weinstein’s British assistants in the late 90s, reached a settlement and signed an NDA in 1998 after they alleged he attempted to rape Chiu at the Venice film festival. Perkins and Chiu are not part of the proposed settlement, but say they are speaking out for other victims.“This is the whole reason I broke my NDA, so women can’t be pushed into a corner,” Perkins told the Guardian.“It is not indicative or correct compensation for the crimes and the majority of that money is being fed back to Harvey’s own defence,” she said of the deal. “They’re making it look like he’s compensating victims but he and his board of directors will be gaining more than the individuals will be.”Perkins added: “Ultimately the most important thing is that these women get compensation.”Wigdor said: “We are not seeking to prevent survivors who want to participate in a settlement from doing so. We just want to ensure that those who don’t are not precluded from going after insurance proceeds and the directors, and that the terms of the agreement are fair.”Caitlin Dulany, a lead plaintiff in the settlement, believes it is the best option for many women.If the settlement did not go ahead, she said, “it would mean that the majority of us – whose claims were dismissed or outside the statute of limitations – would be unlikely to recover anything. The settlement is important to me because it recognises the trauma that all survivors have endured, and not just that of a select few.”If the proposed settlement or an amended version were to proceed, it would allow other accusers to join.Katherine Kendall who like Dulany was part of the original class action, said: “It’s been a huge effort for all of us over the past two years, but the main thing is we want to be in a position where other women can come forward and join us..”Lisa Rose, who worked as a British administrator for Weinstein in 1988 and claims he harassed her, said she would file an objection to the settlement but added: “I understand completely that for some women taking the settlement is the right course of action and don’t want to get in their way.”



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Violent protests rage in India for fourth day over citizenship law

Violent protests rage in India for fourth day over citizenship lawKOLKATA/LUCKNOW (Reuters) – Demonstrators in eastern India set fire to more than a dozen buses and vandalized at least six railway stations on Saturday, as violent protests against a new citizenship law continued for a fourth straight day. Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government says the new law will save religious minorities such as Hindus and Christians from persecution in neighboring Bangladesh, Pakistan and Afghanistan by offering them a path to Indian citizenship. The law’s enactment has stirred up protests across India, but the eastern part of the country, where movements against Bangladeshi immigrants have raged for decades, has been among the worst hit.



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Pete Buttigieg: race is between me and Warren – as new poll puts him fourth

Pete Buttigieg: race is between me and Warren – as new poll puts him fourth* Buttigieg: Senator’s Medicare for All plan is ‘polarising’ * Opinion: Goodbye, Beto. A sad end to a pointless campaignPete Buttigieg, the Democratic presidential candidate and mayor of South Bend, Indiana, speaks in Des Moines, Iowa, on last week. Photograph: Scott Olson/Getty ImagesPete Buttigieg is fourth in a four-strong pack clear of the Democratic presidential field, according to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll. But he thinks the final choice of who will challenge Donald Trump will be between him and Elizabeth Warren.In an interview to be broadcast on Showtime on Sunday, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, said the race is “getting to be a two-way” between him and the Massachusetts senator.“A world where we’re getting somewhere is that world,” he said, “where it’s coming down to the two of us”.According to the Post-ABC poll, former vice-president Joe Biden leads nationally among likely primary voters, with 28% support, from Warren in second on 23%, Vermont senator Bernie Sanders on 17% and Buttigieg on 9%.Asked on ABC’s This Week if this is really a two-way race, Buttigieg said: “Not yet, no. There is a tremendous amount of energy for a range of candidates who are extremely capable. I’m proud to be part of I think the most diverse field ever in Democratic politics and some formidable competition.“But what I will say is there is amazing energy behind our campaign right now. We’re seeing it on the ground here in Iowa, we’re seeing it pick up in a lot of places. And I think voters are really narrowing down their choices instead of just getting to know us.”Buttigieg has surged to second in Iowa, the first state to vote. According to the realclearpolitics.com average, Warren leads there with 22.3% from Buttigieg on 17%, Biden on 15.7% and Sanders on 15.3%.In New Hampshire, the second state to go to the polls, Warren leads the RCP average with 25%, from Biden on 21%, Sanders on 20% and Buttigieg at 8.7%.On Friday night in Des Moines, Iowa, the main candidates addressed the Liberty and Justice Celebration, a major party event. Speaking to ABC from the Hawkeye state on Sunday, Buttigieg was asked how he was different from Warren.He took a swipe, saying: “I think we can deliver major, meaningful, bold changes that move this country forward in a way that galvanises an American majority instead of polarising our country further.”“We’re going to need a president who can pick up the pieces and can bring the country together.”On Friday, Warren unveiled a $ 20.5tn Medicare for All plan which duly attracted criticism from Democrats as well as attacks from Republicans and President Trump. Buttigieg has proposed “Medicare for all who want it”, meaning a plan that would not end private insurance cover. He also says he will not raise taxes on the middle class to pay for healthcare reform.Asked about Warren’s contention that opponents of Medicare for All “are not going to win by repeating Republican talking points and by dusting off the points of view of the giant insurance companies and the giant drug companies”, Buttigieg said: “Well, the insurance companies are fighting my proposal, because they don’t want the competition.“What is just not true is that her’s is the only solution. This ‘my way or the highway’ idea, that either you’re for kicking everybody off their private plans in four years or you’re for business as usual, it’s just not true. I’m proposing Medicare for all who want it.”Medicare for All, he said “ could very well be the long-run destination”.Buttigieg was also asked about his struggle to attract support from black voters, a key constituency. The New York Times reported recently that his own focus groups had indicated such problems were in part due to the fact he is gay.Buttigieg said: “I think the biggest question on any voter’s mind when they’re sizing us candidates up and thinking about how they’re going to vote is this: how will my life be different if you’re president versus one of your competitors?”He did not entirely dodge the question, adding pointedly: “And when we have the best answer to that question, I think a lot of prejudices and a lot of those other considerations fall away, and it comes down to vision and results.”Elsewhere in the Democratic race, this week saw former congressman Beto O’Rourke drop out. Other notable recent moves include the California senator Kamala Harris slashing staff in New Hampshire to focus on Iowa and Biden acceding to the formation of a Super pac, making him open to corporate funding.In the Post-ABC poll, Harris, fellow senators Amy Klobuchar and Cory Booker, representative Tulsi Gabbard and the tech entrepreneur Andrew Yang all polled 2%. Other candidates with national name recognition, including former Obama housing secretary Julián Castro, polled even lower.The Post-ABC poll also asked some sharp questions, given claims by opponents that Biden, 76, and Sanders, 78, may be too old to fight the Trump machine.On the question of which leading Democrat had “the sharpest mental ability”, Warren led with 24%, from Biden at 21%, Sanders at 17% and Buttigieg at 15%. Harris, a former California attorney general, placed fifth on 7%.Sanders recently suffered a heart attack. Poll respondents were split on whether he was healthy enough to be president, 48% saying he was and 45% saying he was not.



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Biden in Fourth Place in Latest Iowa Poll

Biden in Fourth Place in Latest Iowa PollFormer vice president Joe Biden fell to fourth place in the latest poll of Democratic presidential primary candidates in Iowa.The poll, conducted by the New York Times and Siena College, shows Massachusetts senator Elizabeth Warren in the lead with 22 percent of the prospective vote. Vermont senator Bernie Sanders placed second with 19 percent, while South Bend, Indiana, mayor Pete Buttigieg took 18 percent.Biden received 17 percent of the vote.As part of the poll, respondents were asked which candidate they were most confident could beat President Trump in the elections. The survey found voters were most confident in Biden's and Warren's chances of winning against the incumbent president.Warren's surge to the front of the latest Iowa poll comes as details of her universal medicare plan were revealed Friday morning. The Senator's proposal, while similar to that of Sanders, would cost $ 52 trillion over ten years. The plan would be funded by taxes on employers as well as taxes on rich Americans and corporations, in addition to Warren's trademark wealth tax.A previous survey of Iowa caucus voters found Biden in the lead, barely edging out Warren.Biden also retains the national lead in the Democratic primaries, according to RealClearPolitics. The former vice president gained the lead in a CNN poll released October 23.Buttigieg, while not polling well nationally, surged in Iowa recently. The Indiana mayor has sought to portray himself as a moderate alternative to Warren and Sanders, and questioned their ability to fund universal medicare coverage during the October Democratic primary debate.



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Impeachment's hectic fourth week ends. Here's what to look for next week.

Impeachment's hectic fourth week ends. Here's what to look for next week.The fourth week of the Democrats’ impeachment inquiry in Congress was the busiest so far, with five different depositions, a fractious meeting of Republicans and Democrats at the White House, and a shocking press conference by President Trump’s chief of staff.



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Fourth of July 2019: What is the history behind America’s biggest national holiday?

Fourth of July 2019: What is the history behind America’s biggest national holiday?Americans celebrate the Fourth of July every year, with 2019 marking the 243rd anniversary of the founding of the United States.An occasion for parties, barbecues, fireworks and, under Donald Trump, tank displays and Air Force flyovers, this is the most significant national holiday in the American calendar, an unabashed expression of patriotic pride.For the unitiated, here’s everything you need to know. What is it?The occasion honours the signing of the Declaration of Independence by the Founding Fathers on 4 July 1776.In putting quill to parchment, these 56 statesmen – Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin among them – renounced the British Empire and pronounced the North American colonies free states.A modern superpower was born. What’s the story behind it?The British Empire had built a commanding presence in the New World since Sir Walter Raleigh led the first attempts to establish settlements on the east coast in the late Elizabethan era.By the 18th century, North America was governed from London and comprised of the Thirteen Colonies, consisting of Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Georgia, Connecticut, Massachusetts Bay, Maryland, South Carolina, New Hampshire, Virginia, New York, North Carolina and Rhode Island and the Providence Plantations.Primarily agricultural lands, the Thirteen Colonies were exploited by their imperial rulers for their resources, particularly the territories’ lucrative tobacco crops. While relations between settlers and the Crown were initially amicable, tensions began to escalate under King George III over opposition to the imposition of British laws and taxes, notably the Stamp Act. A growing spirit of nationalism swelled among the native-born. By 1765, Americans began to demand an end to “taxation without representation”, calling for their voices to be heard in the Houses of Parliament.Acts of dissent followed, notably the Boston Tea Party in 1773. A protest against the Tea Act, which gave the East India Company a monopoly, the incident saw a group known as the Sons of Liberty dressed as Native Americans dump an entire shipment of imported British tea leaves into the city’s harbour.The demonstration was both a gleeful satire of the ruling power’s obsession with its national beverage and a call to arms against the decadence and entitlement of empire.Further ill-feeling was fostered by the Coercive Acts, known as the “Intolerable Acts” among American Patriots, which retracted Massachusetts’ semi-independence as punishment for the Tea Party humiliation.Two Continental Congresses were staged bringing together delegates from the Thirteen Colonies to coordinate the resistance. At the second meeting in Philadelphia in 1775, the Declaration of Independence was signed and the American War of Independence declared, with open combat erupting in Concord, Massachusetts, that April. The conflict would rage for eight years, until the signing of the Treaty of Paris in 1783.The declaration was drafted by the Committee of Five – Jefferson, Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman and Robert Livingston – and established citizens’ “unalienable” rights, observing that “all men are created equal” and enshrining the individual’s entitlement to “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness”.The draft was submitted to Congress on 28 June 1776, voted into law on 2 July and formally ratified on 4 July, a date that has been celebrated by patriotic Americans ever since. It was first published in The Pennsylvania Evening Post two days later. How has it been celebrated through history? The first readings of the Declaration were made in Philadelphia squares and met with bonfires and the ringing of bells.In Bristol, Rhode Island, a salute of 13 gunshots in the morning and evening marked the day in 1777, the country’s first formal 4 July celebration and a point of pride in the town to this day, which has held an annual parade since 1785. In 1778, George Washington, then a general in the revolutionary army, issued his troops with a double rum ration to cheer the day. The first recorded music commemorating independence was the “Psalm of Joy”, written by Johann Friedrich Peter in Salem, North Carolina, in 1783. Congress made the day an unpaid national holiday for federal workers in 1870 but it has been a paid vacation since 1938. How do people celebrate it today?All major cities hail 4 July with spectacular fireworks displays, the White House giving its own.The occasion is otherwise marked in towns across America with picnics, baseball games, marches, brass brands playing John Philip Sousa and performances of “The Star-Spangled Banner”.As a national holiday, it also serves as an occasion for family reunions and vacations.



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Tanks, flag burning and the Trump baby balloon: What we know about the July Fourth parade

Tanks, flag burning and the Trump baby balloon: What we know about the July Fourth paradePresident Donald Trump will take center stage at Fourth of July festivities in Washington D.C. on Thursday that will also feature Army tanks and military flyovers.



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Trump officials 'fear embarrassingly tiny crowd' for his Fourth of July speech

Trump officials 'fear embarrassingly tiny crowd' for his Fourth of July speechDonald Trump‘s aides fear an embarrassingly small crowd may turn out for his tradition-shattering Fourth of July address in Washington DC, according to a report.The White House has been trying to ensure a high number of attendees in the face of potentially poor weather and a free concert at the far end of the National Mall from the Lincoln Memorial, the Washington Post reported.Crowd size has been a sore point for Mr Trump, who has repeatedly claimed in the face of the evidence that attendance at his inauguration was the highest ever.The president is set to speak in front of a ticket-only crowd of Republican donors, administration and campaign officials, family members and those who gather to either hear him or protest his policies.It has been nearly seven decades since a president spoke on the Mall on independence day. The Korean War was taking place when Harry Truman addressed a large gathering on the Washington Monument grounds to mark the 175th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence.Mr Trump is expected to be flanked by military vehicles amid a huge mobilisation and plans for fly-pasts by fighter jets and a stealth bomber.He dismissed complaints at the probable high cost of the extravaganza in a tweet on Wednesday.“The cost of our great Salute to America tomorrow will be very little compared to what it is worth. We own the planes, we have the pilots, the airport is right next door (Andrews), all we need is the fuel. We own the tanks and all. Fireworks are donated by two of the greats. Nice!” he said.The cost of flying a B-2 Spirit stealth bomber for one hour is $ 122,311 (£96,500), according to the US Air Force.



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Trump news – live: President pleads with people to attend his July the Fourth celebration amid fears of small crowds and tank damage

Trump news – live: President pleads with people to attend his July the Fourth celebration amid fears of small crowds and tank damageDonald Trump’s “Salute to America” is set to take place in Washington, DC, on Thursday as the country celebrates Independence Day, with the grand military spectacle threatened by fears of a low turnout and concerns that the heavy tanks on display could damage the Lincoln Memorial.A new Morning Consult poll has meanwhile revealed the president to be losing support in key states he won in 2016, including Michigan, Wisconsin, Iowa, Pennsylvania, Arizona, Ohio and Florida, as his Republican opponent Justin Amash announces his resignation from the GOP in opposition to Mr Trump's "dehumanising rhetoric".Undeterred, the president has been on angry form on Twitter, hitting out at migrants over reports of squalid conditions in US border detention centres and warning Iran against making threats by issuing one of his own: “They can come back to bite you.”Please allow a moment for our liveblog to load



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Trump facing criticism for July Fourth celebration as tanks arrive on National Mall

Trump facing criticism for July Fourth celebration as tanks arrive on National MallArmored vehicles, bombers and military jets will be featured at the 'Salute to America' event in Washington, D.C.; Ellison Barber reports on the preparations and reaction.



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