Tag Archives: Firing

Canadian group blames corporate interests for firing anti-Trump artist whose work went viral

Canadian group blames corporate interests for firing anti-Trump artist whose work went viralA Facebook statement from the president of the Association of Canadian Cartoonists took aim at one of Canada's richest men in the controversy over an artist's Trump-critical cartoons.Canadian political cartoonist Michael de Adder, whose previous syndication reached over a million readers a week, was released from his contract to draw for newspapers in his native New Brunswick after he posted sensitive anti-Trump art on social media. The cartoon, which appeared on his accounts June 26th, depicts the American president standing over the bodies of Oscar Alberto Martinez and Angie Valeria, two El Salvadoran migrants who recently drowned while attempting to cross the Rio Grande River into Texas (as a caution, the art behind that link can be considered disturbing). In de Adder's piece, Trump holds golf clubs and asks the prone figures if they "mind if he plays through," highlighting Trump's assumed indifference to the human cost of his administration's immigration policies. The art quickly went viral, even more so after de Adder announced that he was let go from New Brunswick newspapers the Times & Transcript, the Daily Gleaner, and the Telegraph-Journal– all of which are owned by Brunswick News.De Adder announced the news on June 28 via Twitter and followed up with the clarification that he was let go from his contract, not fired, as he was not technically an employee; he also expressed sadness over no longer being able to draw for New Brunswick papers but insisted he was "not a victim." > My cartoons will no longer appear in @TimesTranscript @DailyGleaner @TJProvincial @TJGreaterSJ> > — Michael de Adder (@deAdder) June 28, 2019> I've got to admit, it hurts pretty bad. I'm a New Brunswicker.> > — Michael de Adder (@deAdder) June 28, 2019Two days after de Adder lost his contract, the president of the Association of Canadian Cartoonists released a statement on Facebook that speculated de Adder was let go to mollify J.K. Irving. The Canadian billionaire (listed at the fourth richest person in Canada) owns both the Brunswick News and J.D. Irving, Limited, a conglomerate with numerous international trade interests. In the statement, association president Wes Tyrell wrote that despite de Adder being known for drawing anti-Trump art, he had been discouraged from doing so for Brunswick News outlets. Tyrell also claimed that while Irving's papers had never published de Adder' Trump cartoons (including the piece in question) the amount of attention de Adder received for this particular cartoon put a target on his back. "Trade has been an issue since Trump took office, trade that affects the Irvings directly," Tyrell wrote, adding, "not to mention a host of other issues. And the President himself is an unknown quantity who punishes those who appear to oppose him."Tyrell connected Irving's dual ownership of Brunswick News and J.D. Irving, Limited and placed the blame for de Adder' situation on the billionaire's shoulders, noting that "whether the powers that be in America would make the connection between de Adder's cartoon and Brunswick News Inc doesn't matter. It seems that the Irving's [sic] don't want to take that chance. So they cut all ties. A solid reason why an oil company has no business owning newspapers."  WATCH: 2018 was the year of the youth activist



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To save its 'Catholic identity,' Indianapolis' Cathedral High School is firing a gay teacher

To save its 'Catholic identity,' Indianapolis' Cathedral High School is firing a gay teacherCathedral High School is one of 68 schools Catholic recognized by the Archdiocese of Indianapolis and serves about 1,100 students in grades 9-12.



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Trump campaign is firing pollsters after humiliating polling numbers are leaked

Trump campaign is firing pollsters after humiliating polling numbers are leakedDonald Trump’s campaign has decided to fire some of its pollsters after a leak of poor internal polls for the US president that he denied existed.Just two days before Mr Trump is set to kick off his bid for re-election, a top adviser said on Sunday that the campaign was cutting ties with three of its five pollsters to prevent further disclosure of survey data. The polling showed Mr Trump behind former vice president Joe Biden in several key battleground states, including by double digits in Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania.The results were confirmed by advisers to Mr Trump, but when they became public he called them “fake polls.”For days, aides to Mr Trump have tried to figure out whom to point the finger at over the leak of the data, which jolted and infuriated the president. But in continuing to discuss it, aides violated a long-held unofficial rule of campaigns not to comment publicly on internal polling, even if the numbers leak.[gallery-0] The resulting furore led to an effort by the campaign manager, Brad Parscale, to tighten control. By removing several pollsters, the campaign hopes to shrink the circle of outside operatives who have access to information that could leak, according to the presidential adviser who was not authorised to speak publicly.The rupture of the team came even as the US president and his advisers were preparing for a large and elaborate rally in Orlando, Florida, on Tuesday night to formally open his campaign for a second term. Mr Trump was hoping for a show of strength as Democrats had drawn increasing attention before their first debates on 26 and 27 June. The internal poll numbers, while not predictive, painted a bleak picture of the current state of the race for Mr Trump, at least against Mr Biden, when they were taken in March. They showed a number of critical states at risk – not just Florida and the Midwestern states, but even some longtime Republican bastions like Georgia. A Democratic state that Mr Trump’s aides have insisted they want to put in play, Minnesota, appeared out of reach for the president.The polling was reported on by The New York Times nearly two months ago without citing specific numbers. Last week, The Times reported that Mr Trump had told aides to deny that such polls existed and to say that other data in the survey showed him doing well.Some aides to the US president appeared to be using the episode to undermine one of the president’s closest advisers, Kellyanne Conway, who was Trump’s final campaign manager in 2016 and is now his White House counsellor.Ms Conway’s relationship with Mr Trump, and the praise he has given her for his 2016 victory, have long stirred envy among other advisers to the president. Her former firm, the Polling Co, was one of the ones to be ousted.Ms Conway no longer has any formal ties to the company, which was sold in 2017 to CRC Public Relations, a well-known conservative advocacy firm.In addition to Ms Conway’s former firm, the Trump adviser said the campaign would cut ties with Adam Geller, a pollster for former Governor Chris Christie of New Jersey, and Michael Baselice, a pollster for former Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger of California. Both men were late additions to Mr Trump’s campaign in 2016.NBC News first reported the decision to oust the pollsters, although it did not identify which ones. Two other pollsters, Tony Fabrizio and John McLaughlin, will remain with the campaign.Mr Fabrizio conducted the March survey for Mr Trump. As a pollster, he worked for Mr Trump’s company many years ago.But he was brought into the 2016 campaign by Paul Manafort, Mr Trump’s former campaign chairman who was one of the people charged by the special counsel, Robert Mueller.Mr McLaughlin has known Mr Trump for years and did informal work for him in 2011 when the real estate developer was considering running for president.Mr Fabrizio and Ms Conway declined to comment. Mr McLaughlin and the other pollsters did not immediately respond to requests for comment.In recent weeks, Mr Trump has angrily denied receiving polls showing him losing or instructing aides to deny them. “Those polls don’t exist,” Mr Trump told ABC News in an interview broadcast on Thursday.“I just had a meeting with somebody that’s a pollster and I’m winning everywhere, so I don’t know what you’re talking about.”But on Friday, ABC reported specific information from that supposedly fake polling. The data obtained by ABC showed Mr Biden leading Trump 55 per cent – 39 per cent in Pennsylvania, 51 per cent – 41 per cent in Wisconsin and by 7 points in Florida. The US president was leading in Texas, a bulwark for Republican presidential candidates for four decades, by just 2 points.When approached by the network with the numbers, Mr Parscale confirmed that they were accurate, but dismissed them as outdated, insisting that the president’s public standing had subsequently been helped by Attorney General William Barr’s initial characterisation of the special counsel’s report. A redacted version of Mueller’s report has since been released, showing that it was not as favourable as Mr Barr suggested.“These leaked numbers are ancient, in campaign terms, from months-old polling that began in March before two major events had occurred: the release of the summary of the Mueller report exonerating the president, and the beginning of the Democrat candidates defining themselves with their far-left policy message,” Mr Parscale said in a statement on Friday.“Since then, we have seen huge swings in the president’s favour across the 17 states we have polled, based on the policies now espoused by the Democrats,” he said. “The president is correct that we have no current polls against defined Democrats – at all – that show him losing in any of the states we have tested.”Internal polls, like any other surveys, are a snapshot in time and not predictive more than 18 months from Election Day, especially with Mr Trump’s Democratic challenger yet to be determined. Historically, they are used by campaigns to guide their understanding of where to expend resources, and of the mood of the electorate.But Mr Trump is famously focused on numbers as affirmation – the larger the better – and he has recoiled at suggestions that he is struggling in a general election contest. Throughout 2016, Mr Trump began almost every conversation with reporters by highlighting his polling lead in public surveys of the Republican primary field.“Well, the polls I see, we’re doing great in Pennsylvania,” he said in a telephone interview with “Fox & Friends” on Friday. “We’re doing really good in North Carolina. Florida, I’m winning by a lot. Ohio, I’m winning by a lot. I just left Iowa. We’re winning that by a lot. And every poll that I see and every poll that we have, I’m winning by – we’re doing well.”New York Times



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Obama warns Democrats that ideological 'rigidity' can lead to a 'circular firing squad'

Obama warns Democrats that ideological 'rigidity' can lead to a 'circular firing squad'Former President Barack Obama warned Democrats about ideological "rigidity" and urged compromise in order to avoid a "circular firing squad."



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Barack Obama warns progressives to avoid 'circular firing squad'

Barack Obama warns progressives to avoid 'circular firing squad'* Remarks come as Democrats battle for 2020 nomination * Former president was addressing young Europeans in GermanyBarack Obama addresses a town hall of young leaders from across Europe at an Obama Foundation event in Berlin, Germany, on Saturday. Photograph: Fabrizio Bensch/ReutersBarack Obama warned on Saturday that US progressives risk creating a “circular firing squad” at a time when prospective presidential candidates are competing fiercely against each other to run against Donald Trump.The former president was speaking in Berlin, at an Obama Foundation event.“One of the things I do worry about sometimes among progressives in the United States,” he said, “maybe it’s true here as well, is a certain kind of rigidity where we say, ‘Uh, I’m sorry, this is how it’s going to be’ and then we start sometimes creating what’s called a ‘circular firing squad’, where you start shooting at your allies because one of them has strayed from purity on the issues.“And when that happens, typically the overall effort and movement weakens.”Sign up for the US morning briefingAmong Democrats, the field of prospective presidential nominees has swelled to nearly 20. All are eager to appeal to a party base pushed left in opposition to a hard-right president and motivated by success in the midterm elections.Championed by progressive luminaries including the Vermont senator Bernie Sanders and New York congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, policy ideas such as Medicare for All and the Green New Deal have achieved rising prominence.On either side of the aisle, party primaries are traditionally brutal affairs in which candidates are tested against rivals from other wings or factions. The first debates of the 2020 Democratic contest are months away but fierce fire is already being directed towards some more centrist candidates.Obama’s former vice-president, Joe Biden, for example, has not yet entered the race but has nonetheless attracted attacks on his record over close to 50 years in national life, including previous stances on racial issues and women’s rights. He has also struggled to respond effectively to claims from a number of women that he made them physically uncomfortable.Among other candidates, the former Texas congressman Beto O’Rourke has been attacked over a voting record on issues such as the environment and immigration which indicates a willingness to engage with Republicans.Kamala Harris, the California senator, has attracted broadsides over her prosecutorial record before she entered national politics.Republicans are of course seeking to stoke the flames of controversy themselves. Sarah Dolan, executive director of the America Rising political action committee, told the Guardian this weekend the group’s “mantra this cycle is really just to cause chaos, especially with how big the field is”.Barack Obama’s remarks in Berlin.In Germany, Obama also discussed the virtues and drawbacks of political compromise. He advised his audience of young Europeans to “take some time to think in your own mind and continually refine and reflect, ‘What are my core principles?’“Because the danger is if you don’t know what your principles are, that’s when you compromise your principles away.”He added: “You can’t set up a system in which you don’t compromise on anything, but you also can’t operate in a system where you compromise on everything.”Answering questions, Obama said progressives needed to think about remaining “true to our values and principles while recognising that in democracies … the only way we are going to be able to get things done is that we agree to a certain set of rules and part of those rules are that you never get 100% of what you want”.He cited the Paris climate agreement as an example of an imperfect deal achieved under his presidency with the aim of building on it later. Trump has withdrawn the US from the deal.



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Obama warns progressives to avoid 'circular firing squad' as Democrats prepare for 2020 showdown

Obama warns progressives to avoid 'circular firing squad' as Democrats prepare for 2020 showdownBarack Obama has urged progressives in the US to avoid becoming part of a “circular firing squad” that takes aim at people who do not share all their views.In what will be interpreted as a comment about the nature of the rivalry between different factions within the Democratic Party, the former president stressed the need for compromise.“The way we structure democracy requires you to take into account people who don’t agree with you,” he said at an event in Berlin hosted by the Obama Foundation. “And that, by definition, means you’re not going to get 100 per cent of what you want.”According to The Hill, he added: “One of the things I do worry about sometimes among progressives in the United States….is a certain kind of rigidity where we say, ‘Uh, I’m sorry, this is how it’s going to be’, and then we start sometimes creating what’s called a “circular firing squad”, where you start shooting at your allies because one of them has strayed from purity on the issues. “And when that happens, typically the overall effort and movement weakens.”The 2016 Democratic presidential primary was marked by often bitter hostility between the camps of Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders. Supporters of the Vermont senator considered her a Wall Street sell-out, while many of those backing the former secretary of state believed Mr Sanders was out of touch and campaigned for unrealistic policies.As Democrats prepare to select a challenger to Donald Trump for 2020 – congressman Tim Ryan announced on Saturday he was joining the already crowded field – different factions are already becoming clear. Progressives such as Elizabeth Warren and Mr Sanders support policies such as Medicare for All and the Green New Deal.Others, such as Beto O’Rourke and Cory Booker have adopted a more centrist position. With perhaps as many as 20 Democratic candidates running in 2020, there is already a energetic fight underway for supporters and donations, something that will intensify as the contest progresses. At the same time, Mr Obama said it was important for candidates to know what they stood for. “You should take some time to think in your own mind and continually refine and reflect, ‘What are my core principles’,” he said. “Because the danger is if you don’t know what your principles are, that’s when you compromise your principles away.”He added: “You can’t set up a system in which you don’t compromise on anything, but you also can’t operate in a system where you compromise on everything.”



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Texts show manager firing student who asked off for funeral

Texts show manager firing student who asked off for funeralEWING, N.J. (AP) — A text exchange shows a New Jersey restaurant manager firing an employee after she asked for time off to attend a friend's funeral.



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Nissan accuses chief Ghosn of misconduct, proposes firing him

Nissan accuses chief Ghosn of misconduct, proposes firing himAutomaker Nissan on Monday accused its chairman Carlos Ghosn of “significant acts of misconduct” including underreporting his salary and said it would move to fire him, as reports emerged he faced arrest in Tokyo. In a statement, Nissan said it had been conducting a probe into Ghosn for several months after receiving a whistleblower report and had uncovered misconduct going back several years. The statement came after local media reported that Ghosn was being questioned Monday night by prosecutors in Tokyo and was expected to be arrested on violation of financial regulations including misreporting his income.



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Top House Judiciary Dem on Jeff Sessions' firing, acting attorney general

Top House Judiciary Dem on Jeff Sessions' firing, acting attorney generalRep. Jerrold Nadler, the incoming chair of the House Judiciary Committee, addresses the firing of Attorney General Jeff Sessions on "This Week."



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Putin shows off sniper skills firing Kalashnikov rifle

Putin shows off sniper skills firing Kalashnikov rifleRussian state television showed Putin in goggles and earphones crouching as he fired the silver rifle at the Kalashnikov company’s shooting range outside Moscow. “The target is set up practically at the maximum distance,” Rossiya 24 television reported, saying that Putin appeared to be pressing the trigger while holding his breath and between heartbeats as professional snipers are supposed to do. Putin “shot five times and hit the target more than half the time” the television channel reported.



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