Tag Archives: Finds

Kansas Postal Worker Finds Giant Boa Constrictor Wrapped Around Mailbox

Kansas Postal Worker Finds Giant Boa Constrictor Wrapped Around MailboxNo letters for these folks today!



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John Oliver Finds Himself In 'Pure Straight-Up Opposite World'

John Oliver Finds Himself In 'Pure Straight-Up Opposite World'John Oliver of "Last Week Tonight" wants to make sure Americans aren't fooled



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Amateur fossil hunter finds rare teeth from ancient mega-shark on Australian beach

Amateur fossil hunter finds rare teeth from ancient mega-shark on Australian beachA rare set of teeth from a giant prehistoric mega-shark twice the size of the great white have been found on an Australian beach by a keen-eyed amateur enthusiast, scientists said on Thursday. Philip Mullaly was strolling along an area known as a fossil hotspot at Jan Juc, on the country's famous Great Ocean Road some 100 kilometres (60 miles) from Melbourne, when he made the find. "I was walking along the beach looking for fossils, turned and saw this shining glint in a boulder and saw a quarter of the tooth exposed," he said. "I was immediately excited, it was just perfect and I knew it was an important find that needed to be shared with people." He told Museums Victoria, and Erich Fitzgerald, senior curator of vertebrate palaeontology, confirmed the seven centimetre-long (2.7 inch) teeth were from an extinct species of predator known as the great jagged narrow-toothed shark (Carcharocles angustidens). The shark, which stalked Australia's oceans around 25 million years ago, feasting on small whales and penguins, could grow more than nine metres long, almost twice the length of today's great white shark. Fossil enthusiast Philip Mullaly holds a giant shark tooth Credit: WILLIAM WEST/AFP "These teeth are of international significance, as they represent one of just three associated groupings of Carcharocles angustidens teeth in the world, and the very first set to ever be discovered in Australia," Mr Fitzgerald said. He explained that almost all fossils of sharks worldwide were just single teeth, and it was extremely rare to find multiple associated teeth from the same shark. This is because sharks, who have the ability to regrow teeth, lose up to a tooth a day and cartilage, the material a shark skeleton is made of, does not readily fossilise. Mr Fitzgerald suspected they came from one individual shark and there might be more entombed in the rock. So he led a team of palaeontologists, volunteers, and Mr Mullaly on two expeditions earlier this year to excavate the site, collecting more than 40 teeth in total. Most came from the mega-shark, but several smaller teeth were also found from the sixgill shark (Hexanchus), which still exists today. Museums Victoria palaeontologist Tim Ziegler said the sixgill teeth were from several different individuals and would have become dislodged as they scavenged on the carcass of the Carcharocles angustidens after it died. "The stench of blood and decaying flesh would have drawn scavengers from far around," he said. "Sixgill sharks still exist off the Victorian coast today, where they live off the remains of whales and other animals. This find suggests they have performed that lifestyle here for tens of millions of years."



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Ohio Finds Nearly 600 Uncounted Votes In Too-Close-To-Call Special Election

Ohio Finds Nearly 600 Uncounted Votes In Too-Close-To-Call Special ElectionOhio officials have discovered 588 uncounted votes in this week's special



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Woman helps man short on cash at gas station, finds out he's Keith Urban

Woman helps man short on cash at gas station, finds out he's Keith UrbanA New Jersey woman who thought she was helping a down-and-out man pay for his gas station food ended up footing the bill for country music star Keith Urban.



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Stonehenge builders were Welsh, Oxford University finds

Stonehenge builders were Welsh, Oxford University findsIt is perhaps the most English of English monuments. But a new study by Oxford University and University College London suggests that Stonehenge was actually built by the Welsh. Although it was known that that the bluestones of the megalithic monument had been sourced from the Preseli Mountains in Wales, it was generally thought the builders travelled there from modern-day Wiltshire to get them. However isotope analysis of the skulls of people buried at the 5000-year-old Neolithic monument show unmistakable Welsh origins. Isotopes of elements occur everywhere in the environment, and those that are in the food we eat or the water we drink become incorporated into our tissue and bone.  By looking at the different ratios it is possible to work out where and when a person lived based on their isotope make up.  Professor Mike Parker Pearson, of UCL, who believes that the whole monument may have once stood in Wales, said: “This is a really exciting discovery because it shows how far some of the Stonehenge people travelled.  “But what’s really fascinating is that this date of around 3000 BC coincides with our radiocarbon dates for quarrying at the bluestone outcrops in the Preseli hills of Pembrokeshire.  “Some of the people buried at Stonehenge might have even been involved in moving the stones – a journey of more than 180 miles.” Carn Goedog quarry in Wales, the source of spotted bluestones erected in the early stage of Stonehenge’s construction  Credit: Adam Stanford of Aerial-Cam Ltd Little is known about the people buried at Stonehenge and archaeological analysis has largely focussed on what the megalithic monument was used for rather than who built it. One of the problems is that many of the human remains were cremated, so it was thought isotope analysis would be impossible.  However new developments in archaeological analysis, pioneered by lead author Christophe Snoeck during his doctoral research at Oxford showed cremated bone does still hold crucial information.  Dr Snoeck said: ‘The recent discovery that some biological information survives the high temperatures reached during cremation (up to 1000 degrees Celsius) offered us the exciting possibility to finally study the origin of those buried at Stonehenge.’ Fragments of skulls found in the Aubrey Holes where they had been cremated  Credit:  Christie Willis With permission from Historic England and English Heritage, the team analysed skulls fragments from 25 individuals which were originally excavated in the 1920s from 56 pits inside Stonehenge, known as ‘Aubrey Holes’, which were named after the seventeenth-century antiquarian John Aubrey who first spotted them.  Analysis of the fragments which dated to around 3000 BC, around the time the monument was built, showed that at least 10 of the 25 people had not spent most of their life near Stonehenge. Instead, they found the isotope ratios in the remains were consistent with living in western Britain, a region that includes west Wales – the known source of Stonehenge’s bluestones.  John Pouncett, a lead author on the paper and Spatial Technology Officer at Oxford’s School of Archaeology, said: “The powerful combination of stable isotopes and spatial technology gives us a new insight into the communities who built Stonehenge.  “The cremated remains from the enigmatic Aubrey Holes and updated mapping of the biosphere suggest that people from the Preseli Mountains not only supplied the bluestones used to build the stone circle, but moved with the stones and were buried there too.” The monument may even have originally been constructed in Wales and then moved to Wiltshire  Credit: Peter Adams Digital Vision The researchers say the results show that complex trade and ritual networks were already well established in Britain as early as 5,000 years ago. It also opens the door to other bones being analysed with were previously thought to be too damaged. Rick Schulting, a lead author on the research and Associate Professor in Scientific and Prehistoric Archaeology at Oxford, explained: “To me the really remarkable thing about our study is the ability of new developments in archaeological science to extract so much new information ­from such small and unpromising fragments of burnt bone. “Our results highlight the importance of revisiting old collections. The cremated remains from Stonehenge were first excavated by Colonel William Hawley in the 1920s, and while they were not put into a museum, Col Hawley did have the foresight to rebury them so that it was possible for Mike Parker Pearson and his team to re-excavate them, allowing various analytical methods to be applied.” The research was published in the journal Nature Scientific Reports. 



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Harvard rated Asian American applicants lower on personality scores than other students, study finds

Harvard rated Asian American applicants lower on personality scores than other students, study findsHarvard admissions officers consistently rated Asian American students lower on “personal qualities” than students of other races, according to admissions data analysed as part of a racial discrimination lawsuit against the prestigious university. A study of 20 years’ worth of admissions data shows Asian American applicants to Harvard scored much better than all other racial groups on measures of academic merit, but worse on subjective analyses of their personal qualities completed by Harvard admissions staff. In fact, the study found Asian Americans had the lowest admission rate of any racial group between 2000 and 2019, despite having higher test scores than every other racial group over the two-decade period.



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DOJ Watchdog Finds James Comey Broke FBI Rules In Clinton Case, Report Says

DOJ Watchdog Finds James Comey Broke FBI Rules In Clinton Case, Report SaysWASHINGTON ― The Justice Department's internal watchdog has concluded that



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Trump finds time to tweet before meeting with Kim Jong Un

Trump finds time to tweet before meeting with Kim Jong UnThe president fired off a series of messages on Twitter just hours before meeting North Korea's leader.



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Probe finds PG&E power lines sparked deadly 2017 California wildfires

Probe finds PG&E power lines sparked deadly 2017 California wildfiresBy Steve Gorman LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – A dozen of the wind-driven blazes that swept northern California’s wine country last fall, killing 46 people in the deadliest firestorm in state history, were sparked by PG&E-owned power lines, state officials said on Friday. The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, or CalFire, also said its investigators had found “evidence of alleged violations of state law” by Pacific Gas & Electric Company and referred those cases to county prosecutors for further review. PG&E issued a statement in response saying the company looked forward to reviewing the CalFire reports, adding, “We continue to believe our overall programs met our state’s high standards.” The findings could have tremendous implications for the San Francisco-based utility company in terms of potential legal liability for one of California’s most lethal and costly disasters.



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