Tag Archives: fear

Trump's Worst Fear: Iran Attacks U.S. Bases and Aircraft Carriers with Missiles

Trump's Worst Fear: Iran Attacks U.S. Bases and Aircraft Carriers with MissilesIran is continuing to develop increasingly long-range ballistic missiles — and is firing some shorter-range missiles in combat — despite demands from the U.S. government that the Islamic republic totally give up any weapons that could, in theory, carry a nuclear warhead.



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Fear grips Bangladesh camp as 2 Rohingya refugees killed

Fear grips Bangladesh camp as 2 Rohingya refugees killedBangladesh police said they had shot dead two Rohingya refugees during a gunfight in a refugee camp on Saturday after the pair were accused of killing a ruling party official. Nearly a million Rohingya live in squalid camps in southeast Bangladesh, 740,000 of whom fled a 2017 military offensive against the Muslim minority in Myanmar. The incident comes two days after a second failed attempt to repatriate the refugees, which saw not a single Rohingya turn up to return across the border to conflict-scarred Rakhine state.



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Tears, fear as Russian students jailed over opposition protests

Tears, fear as Russian students jailed over opposition protestsIn a court on the outskirts of Moscow, fellow students of Yegor Zhukov started weeping as he delivered a speech via a video link from jail. The 21-year-old is among a group of young protesters with bright futures risking criminal convictions and life-changing jail terms as Russia attempts to quell dissent. Zhukov is the most prominent among them thanks to his popular YouTube clips where he criticises President Vladimir Putin’s regime and backs the anti-corruption campaign of opposition leader Alexei Navalny.



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Inside locked down Kashmir, a reporter finds fear and chaos

Inside locked down Kashmir, a reporter finds fear and chaosOn a normal day, it would have been a smooth journey from the airport in Srinagar, the summer capital of Jammu and Kashmir state, to my family home in the northern town of Baramulla. The part that India controls is now under an unprecedented security crackdown to prevent an uprising after the central government in New Delhi unexpectedly stripped the region’s special constitutional status, the last vestige of real autonomy for the predominantly Muslim region that is claimed by both India and Pakistan.



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El Paso shooting: Some victims too scared to seek medical help for ‘fear over immigration status’

El Paso shooting: Some victims too scared to seek medical help for ‘fear over immigration status’Some of the victims of the El Paso Walmart mass shooting avoided seeking medical treatment because they were worried about their immigration status, it is feared.Three weeks ago, Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials carried out mass raids on the homes of migrants in a crackdown by Donald Trump on those in the country without documentation.Juliette Kayyem, formerly of the Homeland Security Department, told CNN: “This is a concern.“It’s clear that there are people not unifying with their family and that there are people who are worried or injured that did not go to hospitals likely because of their immigration status.“That’s something El Paso should probably get ahead on.”Authorities say they are investigating the massacre at the Texas border city supermarket as a race-hate crime. Three Mexicans were among the 20 dead.Border Patrol officials have tried to assure people that no enforcement operations will be carried out at hospitals, the family reunification centre or shelters.> Please be aware that CBP personnel including Border Patrol agents + Field Operations officers have returned to their regular duties. We are not conducting enforcement operations at area hospitals, the family reunification center or shelters. We stand in support of our community> > — CBP West Texas (@CBPWestTexas) > > August 4, 2019Many people said they were sceptical of Border Patrol’s assurances, accusing officials of “inhumanity”.“I keep thinking about the undocu folk in El Paso that didn’t seek medical assistance due to their immigration status,” one posted.“Fear of going to the hospital because you run the chance of being permanently separated from your family shouldn’t have to be anyone’s reality.”Kevin McAleenan, acting secretary at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), tweeted: “El Paso is a home to many DHS law enforcement agents and officers. We join them in support for their families and communities at large.”Greg Allen, El Paso police chief, said authorities were now working to confirm whether a racist, anti-immigrant manifesto posted online shortly before the shootings was written by the suspect.Patrick Crusius, 21, is said to have driven more than 1,000km from his home in Dallas to commit the atrocity.Tens of thousands of central American migrant families cross the border each month, many claiming asylum.The numbers have increased despite Mr Trump’s hardline immigration policies.



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Iran Watch: Should Trump Fear Tehran's Last Missile Test?

Iran Watch: Should Trump Fear Tehran's Last Missile Test?Iran does test medium-range ballistic missiles, although not commonly. What HappenedFor the first time since a standoff between the United States and Iran escalated into attacks on oil tankers, Iran has conducted a medium-range ballistic missile test. According to U.S. officials, Iran test-fired a Shahab-3 medium-range ballistic missile earlier this week that traveled 1,000 kilometers (621 miles) — distance enough to hit Saudi Arabia and come close to Israel.Iran's strategy in carrying out the test is likely twofold. For one, Tehran is engaging in a show of force against the United States as part of the aggressive regional strategy it has pursued over the last three months. At the same time, the launches provide Iran's engineers and missile designers an important opportunity to test technical and operational designs as part of the country's wider ballistic missile program. Iran's Missile Motivations



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North Korea’s 13,000 Deadly Artillery Pieces: The Real Threat Trump Should Fear?

North Korea’s 13,000 Deadly Artillery Pieces: The Real Threat Trump Should Fear?"Even without using nuclear weapons, North Korea has the capacity to unleash a devastating level of violence against a significant portion of the ROK population through some mix of conventional artillery and possibly chemical munitions," according to a January 2019 report from RAND, a California think tank with close ties to the U.S. military.North Korea on May 4, 2019 test-fired a short-range ballistic missile \– its first major launch in the 18 months since North Korean leader Kim Jong Un suspended missile testing ahead of a summit with U.S. president Donald Trump.Pyongyang on May 9, 2019 launched a second “projectile,” South Korean officials said.(This first appeared in May.)The May tests of at least one apparently nuclear-capable short-range missile startled foreign observers and threatened to elevate tensions between the United States and its allies South Korea and Japan on one side and, on the other side, North Korea and its main patron China.But a less dramatic test of North Korea’s heavy artillery that occured at the same time as the May 4 rocket launch arguably is more important.



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Fear, confusion, despair: the everyday cruelty of a border immigration court

Fear, confusion, despair: the everyday cruelty of a border immigration courtAt a federal immigration court in El Paso, Texas, asylum seekers wait in limbo as a result of Trump’s policiesA resident of a migrant shelter watches a soccer match at a nearby park on 9 June. Photograph: Paul Ratje/AFP/Getty ImagesJudge Sunita Mahtabfar, presiding over the El Paso immigration court in south-west Texas, kicked off the hearing by asking the 16 asylum seekers a question.“Is anyone here afraid to return to Mexico?” she said.There was a chorus of “Sí”, at least from the adults. Three of the four children in court dozed, slumped against their parents on the unforgiving wooden benches. They had been up for hours, having been summoned to a meeting point in Juárez at 4.30am. One five-year-old boy was lying on the carpet floor, softly singing as he played with a plastic water bottle.“Let me ask it a different way,” Mahtabfar said. “If anyone here is not afraid to return to Mexico, please raise your hand.”No hands were raised.Most of the 16 people in court had made the long, frequently dangerous, journey from their homes in Central America, hoping to live in the United States.But upon arriving at the US-Mexico border, and attempting to apply for asylum, they had instead been ordered back across the Rio Grande River that forms the border here, to Juárez – one of the most dangerous cities in the world.A migrant from El Salvador shows her documents from Migrant Protection Protocols on 16 June. Photograph: Paul Ratje/AFP/Getty ImagesThis was the first hearing in a months-long process to determine whether they will be granted asylum in the US. It got off to an inauspicious start. The court’s computer system was experiencing difficulties. After changing out the desktop computer at the judge’s desk three times, the hearing was eventually switched to a different room. It was 10.30am, two hours behind schedule, before the session began. While they waited for a working computer, the people in court were kept under heavy security. To use the bathroom, each was escorted by security guards, there and back. They would be returned to Juárez immediately after the hearing.Their exile to wait in limbo in Mexico is the result of the Trump administration’s controversial Remain in Mexico, or Migrant Protection Protocols policy, which has turned back tens of thousands of women, men and children since being introduced in March.With little money, these asylum seekers are forced to live in shelters, in abandoned properties or sometimes on the streets just south of the US border, in cities where immigrants have been sexually assaulted, kidnapped and murdered.On 17 July those in the court, a small, windowless room on the seventh floor of an austere building in downtown El Paso, were well aware of the danger in Juárez. Many were terrified of returning.One 24-year-old woman, wearing a grey T-shirt with her dark hair pulled back into a ponytail, sobbed as she pleaded with the judge to let her stay in the US. She was living in Juárez on her own, she said, and a group of men had been following her in recent days.She said she was aware that she was not meant to enter the US without permission, and had intended to wait in Juárez until she was allowed to enter.“But when I went to work at 8am in the morning there were some people following me,” she said.“So I turned myself in at the bridge.”Another woman, a 26-year-old from Cuba, had tried to enter the US on 4 May, but had been sent back to Juárez. She, too, was in tears as she told the judge she was in danger in Mexico.“I just wanted to tell you I have an affidavit from my family, who are American citizens,” she said through the court translator.“I am over here by myself in Mexico, and it is quite hard for me to be here by myself.”Under Remain in Mexico, the judge told her: “Unfortunately that is not possible.” Both women were told they could have “credible fear” interviews – essentially where a government official gauges how much danger they would be in if they returned to Mexico – but there were no guarantees. The interviews are not open to the press.The Guardian spent two days attending the El Paso federal immigration court, gaining an insight into the fear, confusion and, in some cases, incompetence, that the Trump administration’s immigration policies have led to on the US-Mexico border.Despite the well-documented, appalling conditions in some government detention centers north of the border, there was a stream of people pleading to taken into US custody. One woman, María, said she was afraid to return to Juárez. Two men had been killed two blocks away from where she was staying. A Cuban man said five of his countrymen had been kidnapped in recent weeks.Members of the Mexican national guard patrol the banks of the Rio Bravo in Ciudad Juárez. Photograph: Hérika Martínez/AFP/Getty ImagesBut some of the most harrowing stories coming to light were of the people who had not made it to court.On Wednesday, the attorney for a 19-year-old Honduran told Judge Nathan Herbert that the teenager was unable to make her court date because she had gone missing.The woman had attended court for her preliminary hearing on 22 May. She had told the judge she was afraid to return to Juárez, and was granted a credible fear interview. She was deemed not to be in danger, and was sent back to Mexico, with instructions to reappear in court in July.The 19-year-old has not been seen or heard from since.“The last contact was 22 May,” immigration attorney John Moore said in court.Moore said the day she returned to Mexico was the last day she used WhatsApp, her primary mode of communication, and she never returned to the shelter where she had been staying. Despite hiring a private investigator, Moore had been unable to contact the sponsor the teenager had named in the US, or her family.The judge heard all this on Wednesday afternoon, then tried the 19-year-old’s case in absentia anyway. She was refused entry to the US. Her bid for asylum was denied.A view of the Richard C White federal building in El Paso, Texas, where immigration court hearings take place. Photograph: Paul Ratje/AFP/Getty ImagesIn El Paso, where thousands of migrants have arrived in the past few months, few are able to find lawyers amid the chaos.Instead, many attempt to represent themselves – an almost impossible task, given that asylum application papers are legal documents that have to be filed in English, with supporting evidence also translated into English by a certified translator.Until recently, immigration advocates were allowed to speak to asylum seekers in court, before their cases are heard. They could explain what the hearing would entail – many migrants believe that on their first day in court they might be admitted to the US immediately, when in reality it is a months-long, arcane process – and advise them of their rights.But in an example of the on-the-hoof policy introduced in courts, that was abruptly stopped on 24 June.“All these people are at imminent risk of danger and I could be helping them with that, for free,” said Taylor Levy, an immigration lawyer who was in court on Tuesday, and has previously represented immigrants in El Paso pro-bono.Levy said she was given no prior warning by court officials that she would no longer be able to talk to asylum seekers, until the day it happened.A week later, she was told she could no longer give out coloring books and crayons, something she had been doing for months to help occupy children while their parents pleaded their cases during the long hearings in court.> We already spent one month in Mexico. We haven’t been able to sleep for two nights> > DarwinAdam Serwer, a staff writer for the Atlantic, coined the phrase “the cruelty is the point” to describe Donald Trump’s approach to politics. The term was swiftly picked up and applied, in particular, to the government’s approach to immigrants: the children in cages, the people crammed in dirty shelters or border detention. And the asylum seekers who have terrifying stories of violence and exploitation in their home countries, then are turned around and sent to wait in fear in Mexico. It was deliberate, some have argued, designed to stop people seeking asylum in the US.There is evidence that the practice might be working.On the Tuesday afternoon, a 30-year-old Honduran man named Darwin sat at the front of the court with his 10-year-old son, Christopher. They had crossed the Rio Grande, at El Paso, on 7 June. He was hoping for a better life, looking “to work, and for him to study”, Darwin said, gesturing towards Christopher.Both looked exhausted, red-eyed and dishevelled. Christopher seemed to be crying as his father spoke, to tell the judge that he had changed his mind about entering the US.“We already spent one month in Mexico,” Darwin said, through the court interpreter.“We haven’t been able to sleep for two nights. Look at him, and look at me.”The judge told Darwin that he and Christopher would be taken into custody, and flown back to Honduras. Despite the gang violence and unemployment that has caused thousands of people to flee their country, both father and son looked relieved to be returning home – at least to bring their ordeal at the US border to an end.Perhaps the cruelty really is the point.



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Asylum seekers waiting in Nuevo Laredo fear lurking dangers

Asylum seekers waiting in Nuevo Laredo fear lurking dangersThe round-faced woman from La Ceiba, Honduras, and her 5- and 12-year-old sons arrived in this city across the border from Laredo, Texas, where she had been promised a job and hoped to build a new life. As the United States tries to slow the flow of mostly Central American migrants and asylum seekers to its southern border and pressures Mexico to assist, months-long stays on the Mexican side of the frontier have become the rule for many. The U.S. government tells its own employees not to set foot in nearly all parts of the state.



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Fear and frustration in Iran's capital after aborted US attack

Fear and frustration in Iran's capital after aborted US attackFear of a potential war and frustration over biting sanctions are high in Iran’s capital, after a last-minute decision by the US to pull back from attacking the Islamic Republic. On the surface, it was business as usual on Saturday in Tehran’s bustling Karim Khan street, a hub for printing parts and materials. “We still don’t know what’s going to happen,” said print shop manager Mehrad Farzanegan, less than 48 hours after Washington aborted a military operation against three Iranian targets in response to the Islamic Republic shooting down an unmanned US drone.



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