Tag Archives: Extradition

Russia to U.S: Cancel extradition request for executive held in Italy

Russia to U.S: Cancel extradition request for executive held in ItalyRussia has demanded that the United States cancel a request to extradite a Russian state executive from Italy where he was arrested last month at Washington’s request on suspicion of industrial espionage, calling it illegal. Alexander Korshunov, director for business development at Russia’s United Engine Corporation (UEC), was detained at an airport in Naples on Aug. 30 after Washington issued a warrant for his arrest.



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UPDATE 11-Hong Kong leader pulls extradition bill, but too little too late, say some

UPDATE 11-Hong Kong leader pulls extradition bill, but too little too late, say someHong Kong leader Carrie Lam on Wednesday withdrew an extradition bill that triggered months of often violent protests so the Chinese-ruled city can move forward from a “highly vulnerable and dangerous” place and find solutions. The withdrawal still needs the approval of the Legislative Council, which is not expected to oppose Lam.



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Hong Kong stocks surge after extradition bill withdrawal reports

Hong Kong stocks surge after extradition bill withdrawal reportsHong Kong’s stock market soared Wednesday after local media reported that the city’s embattled leader is planning to fully withdraw a loathed extradition bill, one of the main demands of pro-democracy protesters. The Hang Seng index leapt more than three percent in afternoon trade after the South China Morning Post and HK01 both published reports that the city’s pro-Beijing chief executive Carrie Lam was planning to shelve the bill.



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Hong Kong extradition bill to be withdrawn: Lam

Hong Kong extradition bill to be withdrawn: LamAn extradition bill that triggered three months of unprecedented pro-democracy rallies in Hong Kong will be withdrawn, the city’s leader announced Wednesday, bowing to one of the protesters’ five key demands. Millions of people have taken to Hong Kong’s streets since June in the biggest challenge to China’s rule of semi-autonomous Hong Kong since its handover from the British in 1997. After refusing for months to withdraw the bill, which aimed to allow extraditions of criminal suspects to mainland China, Lam finally conceded as she called for calm.



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Hong Kong leader declares extradition bill 'dead,' but protesters persist

Hong Kong leader declares extradition bill 'dead,' but protesters persistHong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam declared an extradition bill 'dead' after pressure. Yet protesters remain resolute in their demands.



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Hong Kong Leader Carrie Lam Says Extradition Bill Is ‘Dead’ as Unrest Continues

Hong Kong Leader Carrie Lam Says Extradition Bill Is ‘Dead’ as Unrest Continues(Bloomberg) — Hong Kong protest leaders vowed to return to the streets after the city’s leader declared her controversial extradition bill “dead,” suggesting her latest effort to resolve a weeks-long political crisis had backfired.Demonstrators issued new calls for people to join their rallies despite Chief Executive Carrie Lam’s acknowledgment Tuesday that the legislation, which would for the first time allow extraditions to China, wouldn’t get passed. Although it’s the closest she’s come to admitting defeat after an unprecedented wave of unrest — including the ransacking of the city legislature last week — she stopped short of agreeing to protesters’ demand to withdraw the bill.“The bill is dead,” Lam told reporters Tuesday in Hong Kong. “Our work on the extradition bill amendment is a complete failure.”Lam’s refusal to formally retract the proposal left open the possibility that the government could revive it with 12 days’ notice and provided a new rallying point for a protest movement that has persisted through repeat marches, extreme heat and tear gas volleys from police. Opponents of the bill planned another rally Sunday in East New Territories district of Sha Tin, in an attempt to show support far from the city center.“She’s only putting oil on the fire,” Civic Party lawmaker Kwok Ka-ki told reporters Tuesday. “We will anticipate more outcry, more people coming out to the streets to demand for democracy in Hong Kong.”Earlier: Beijing’s Message to Hong Kong: Get in Line or Face IrrelevanceThe legislation has helped unify the former British colony’s once-fractured opposition, drawing hundreds of thousands into the streets and illustrating a source of domestic weakness for Chinese President Xi Jinping in the middle of a growing strategic struggle with the U.S. Lam’s attempts to quiet the unrest — first “pausing” efforts to pass the legislation, then apologizing — have only fueled more protests.Besides demanding the complete withdrawal of the bill, opponents want Lam to resign and drop charges against demonstrators arrested during police clashes. Protesters mustered one of the largest marches ever in city’s Kowloon district Sunday, even after the decision by some protesters to break into and vandalize the Legislative Council chamber drew widespread condemnation.The turmoil has raised new questions about Hong Kong’s long-term viability, almost halfway through China’s 50-year promise to preserve capitalist markets and personal freedoms established by the British. Lam and her backers in Beijing so far appeared determined to hang on, or risk emboldening an opposition bent on slowing their agenda and securing a direct election for chief executive.“Stepping down is not an easy thing,” Lam said, in response to a question about whether she planned to resign. “I still have the enthusiasm and responsibility to serve the public. I hope the public can give my team and myself a chance and space to implement a new administration style.”Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said Beijing had “nothing new to add” since backing Lam’s June 15 decision to suspend efforts to pass the legislation. “The Chinese central government already expressed our support, understanding and respect,” Geng said.Extradition ConcernsThe legislation would let Hong Kong enter one-time deals to transfer criminal suspects to various jurisdictions, including mainland China. The measure fanned worries among the business community and the city’s democracy advocates about the erosion of the “one country, two systems” framework set up before Hong Kong’s return to China.Hong Kong’s dollar fell back into the weak half of its trading band as traders predicted the city’s recent liquidity squeeze is nearing its end, though there was no indication Lam’s remarks had impacted the move. The currency was down 0.15% at 7.8113 per dollar as of 4:14 p.m. local time.Leaders of student groups that have participated in recent protests also rejected an offer from Lam for public talks to reconcile their differences, saying any such meeting must focus on their core demands. Some activists pointed out that four of the five student leaders who Lam met with during a previous bout of mass protests in 2014, when she was the city’s No. 2 official, were later prosecuted for their roles.“Carrie Lam’s invitation for dialogue is a trap,” said Jimmy Sham, a leader of the Civil Human Rights Front, which has organized the biggest recent protests. “Carrie Lam said she has repeatedly reflected on her work and apologized, but a key thing she hasn’t reflected on is that there’s no one in Hong Kong who trusts her, and she hasn’t contemplated why nobody has faith in her.”Lam has failed to heal divisions in the former British colony two years after taking over from her unpopular former boss, Leung Chun-ying, who was forced to forego seeking a second term due to widespread discontent. While Lam may have underestimated the opposition to her extradition bill, her task was complicated by the requirement to serve two masters — Hong Kong and Beijing — without a public vote to provide a mandate.Billy Gung, a 27-year-old accountant who has attended the largest recent protests, said the extradition bill was a piece of the bigger political problem. “Even if the extradition law is dead, there will be other bills in the future that favor Beijing and are not in the interest of Hong Kong,” Gung said.\–With assistance from Bruce Grant, Fion Li, Will Davies and Sharon Chen.To contact the reporters on this story: Natalie Lung in Hong Kong at flung6@bloomberg.net;Carol Zhong in Hong Kong at yzhong71@bloomberg.net;Kari Lindberg in Hong Kong at klindberg13@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.net, Karen LeighFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.



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Hong Kong leader says extradition bill is dead, but critics unconvinced

Hong Kong leader says extradition bill is dead, but critics unconvincedHong Kong leader Carrie Lam said on Tuesday the extradition bill that sparked the Chinese-ruled city’s biggest crisis in decades is dead and that government work on the legislation had been a “total failure”, but critics accused her of playing with words. The bill, which would allow people in Hong Kong to be sent to mainland China to face trial in courts controlled by the Communist Party, sparked huge and at times violent street protests and plunged the former British colony into turmoil. In mid-June, Lam responded to protests that drew hundreds of thousands of people on to the streets by suspending the bill, but that did not stop demonstrations that shut government offices and brought parts of the financial center to a standstill.



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Julian Assange Extradition Could Take Months, or Even Years

Julian Assange Extradition Could Take Months, or Even YearsNow, after he finally overstayed his welcome, he will try to buy more time in the U.K. courts. Lawyers for the WikiLeaks founder said he will fight extradition to the U.S., where he faces charges that he took part in a hacking conspiracy with ex-Army analyst Chelsea Manning to disclose classified government material. While Assange’s attorneys argued that the charges are an illegal attempt to punish a journalist for publishing information, extradition lawyers said that the best he will be able to do is delay his arrival to the U.S. through a process that will likely stretch into 2020.



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How Assange’s arrest and potential extradition might prove embarrassing for Trump

How Assange’s arrest and potential extradition might prove embarrassing for TrumpDespite persistent reports over the last week that Julian Assange was soon to be expelled from the Ecuadorean embassy in London and arrested, when the moment finally arrived, with footage of him being dragged out of the building by police, it was nevertheless a stunning development.What took place, nearly seven years after Assange first sought refuge in the diplomatic mission, is however, not the end of the tale, with all of its twists and turns. It is merely the opening of a new chapter for the founder of WikiLeaks, and one which may reveal important and intriguing information, potentially with far-reaching consequences.Within hours of his arrest, Assange was found guilty at Westminster magistrates court on charges of failing to answer bail in June 2012 after he had been arrested on sexual assault charges made against him in Sweden.Those charges were subsequently dropped. But Elisabeth Massi Fritz, lawyer for one of the two women who accused Assange, announced on Thursday that “we will do everything we can to ensure that the prosecutors resume the Swedish preliminary investigation so that Assange can be extradited to Sweden and prosecuted for rape.”It was, he claimed, fears over extradition to the US which caused him to refuse to go to Sweden to be questioned by prosecutors, and instead seek asylum on Ecuadorian soil. This threat, say his supporters, remains – the fear that he would be extradited to America and face a heavy sentence over Wikileaks’ hacking and dissemination of US intelligence and defence documents in 2010.The US had not hitherto admitted that it is seeking to prosecute Assange, an Australian citizen, but the US justice department had, in November, inadvertently disclosed that he had been secretly charged over the documents when lawyers erroneously included his name in court papers related to another case.The US Justice Department has now unsealed the indictment and insists that Assange faces just five years in prison if convicted.But, a source told CNN on Thursday, the DoJ expects to bring further charges against Assange, but it is not clear what those charges would be or when they would be filed.In the extradition case, which will begin in May in London, charges allege that Assange was involved in a computer hacking conspiracy with Chelsea Manning to crack Defence Department passwords and encourage Manning (then an army private and intelligence analyst called Bradley Manning) to continue to provide classified information.Manning, who was convicted by a court-martial in the hacking of the intelligence and defence material and spent seven years in prison, is currently back in jail for refusing to give evidence to a Grand Jury investigating WikiLeaks and Assange earlier this year.But it is another set of hacks involving Assange and Wikileaks and America which could prove highly problematic for Donald Trump. Assange is suspected of helping Russian interference in the presidential election by releasing information stolen from Hillary Clinton’s campaign and the Democrats and subsequently released by WikiLeaks.Last July the US Justice Department charged 12 Russian military intelligence officers, from the GRU, with hacking computers, with the indictment stating that they had been in contact with WikiLeaks.The former WikiLeaks founder has not been indicted in ‘Russiagate’, but he is certain to face investigation in relation to it if he is returned to the US, with a number of committees of the House of Representatives, now Democrat-controlled, who have begun inquiries into Trump.A number of people close to Trump are said to have been in touch with Assange over the hacking of the Democrat emails, including Roger Stone, a long term and close advisor to the US president. Stone was in January arrested as part of special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian attempts to subvert the election.Mueller’s indictment states that during the election campaign, Stone talked regularly to Trump officials about the information WikiLeaks, called ‘Organisation 1’, possesses which would be damaging to Hillary Clinton’s campaign.“Stone was contacted by senior Trump campaign officials to inquire about future releases by Organisation … On multiple occasions, Stone told senior Trump campaign officials about material possessed by Organisation 1 and the timing of future releases.”Stone had mentioned contacts with Assange and at one point instructed a friend, believed to be the conservative author Jerome Corsi, to “get to” Assange in the Ecuadorean embassy in London and obtain the pending WikiLeaks emails.He also allegedly told Ted Malloch, a Trump supporter in London, to see Assange. Stone later claimed, speaking to a Republican group in Florida: “I actually have communicated with Assange. I believe the next tranche of his documents pertain to the Clinton Foundation, but there’s no telling what the October surprise will be.”A British name has also come up in relation to Assange and the Hillary Clinton emails – that of Nigel Farage. The former Ukip leader, who regularly boasts of his closeness to Trump, visited Assange at the embassy in 2017 after returning from a trip to the US. The news of the visit broke after a member of the public saw him go into the building.Glenn Simpson, whose Washington-based investigations firm hired former MI6 officer Christopher Steele to compile a report on Trump and Russia, told a US Congressional inquiry in January that Mr Farage was a more frequent visitor to Assange than was known and that he had passed data on to Assange on “a thumb drive”.Mr Farage had denied the claims, but refused to tell a number of news organisations what he had discussed with Assange. He said to me when I asked: “I met Julian Assange just once. I went there in a journalistic capacity because like you I wanted to find out about the emails, no real answer was forthcoming. It is nonsense to say that I had met him secretly. Do you think one of the best known faces in the country can go into the embassy without people noticing?”Vladimir Putin’s spokesman Dmitry Peskov said, following Assange’s arrest, that the WikiLeaks founder’s rights must not be violated. Earlier the Foreign Ministry in Moscow had accused Britain of “strangling freedom” over the affair. The footage of Assange, frail, white bearded and dishevelled being taken out of the embassy was livestreamed by Ruptly, a subsidiary of RT, formerly Russia Today, which is bankrolled by the Russian government.Assange now faces potential extradition and litigation in the cases in Sweden and the hacking of the classified intelligence and defence documents in 2010. He also faces investigation and possible litigation over the Democrat hacking in 2016.The legal process on all these cases will likely take a long time, and his lawyers have already said he plans to appeal extradition to the US. More details will emerge about the alleged sexual assaults and collusion with Chelsea Manning and we may, also, discover if Julian Assange played a part in influencing the US presidential election from his house-arrest, albeit self-imposed, in a building in West London.



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Canada begins extradition of top Chinese executive to US

Canada begins extradition of top Chinese executive to USCanada began extraditing Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou to the United States on Friday, the latest move in a case that has roiled relations between the North American neighbors and China. The 47-year-old businesswoman was changing planes in Vancouver in December when she was detained at Washington’s request on suspicion of violating US sanctions on Iran — sparking arrests of Canadians in China that were seen as retaliatory. “Today, Department of Justice Canada officials issued an Authority to Proceed, formally commencing an extradition process in the case of Ms. Meng Wanzhou,” the government said in a statement.



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