Tag Archives: Ethiopian

Report on Ethiopian crash ratchets up pressure on Boeing

Report on Ethiopian crash ratchets up pressure on BoeingNEW YORK (AP) — A preliminary report released Thursday on the Ethiopian Airlines crash last month found that pilots followed all recommended procedures issued by Boeing, ratcheting up pressure on the plane maker that critics say has put profits before safety.



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UPDATE 1-Family of American woman sues Boeing, Ethiopian Airlines over 737 Max crash

UPDATE 1-Family of American woman sues Boeing, Ethiopian Airlines over 737 Max crashThe family of an American woman killed in the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines 737 MAX filed a lawsuit on Thursday against the airline, Boeing Co and Rosemount Aerospace Inc, which makes a part of the aircraft that is the focus of investigators. The complaint was filed in U.S. federal court in Chicago by the parents of Samya Stumo, who lawyers said was on a work trip when Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 crashed on March 10 soon after taking off from Addis Ababa, killing all 157 on board. It was the first lawsuit filed on behalf of a U.S. victim of the Ethiopian disaster and the first to target the airline and parts manufacturer Rosemount, in addition to Boeing.



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Ethiopian Airlines: Pilots followed Boeing emergency procedures but could not stop plane going down, report says

Ethiopian Airlines: Pilots followed Boeing emergency procedures but could not stop plane going down, report saysPilots of an airliner that crashed last month in Ethiopia initially followed Boeing's emergency steps for dealing with a sudden downturn of the nose of their plane but could not regain control, according to a published report. The Wall Street Journal reported Wednesday that pilots of the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max turned off a flight-control system but still couldn't get the plane to climb. They turned the system back on and tried other actions before the plane crashed, the paper said, citing people familiar with preliminary findings of the crash investigation. The findings were confirmed by Ethiopia Airlines on Thursday. In a statement, Boeing urged against speculating before the preliminary report and flight data from the plane are released. The Journal says the pilots' actions are still being evaluated by investigators but could raise questions about assertions made by Boeing and US regulators in the aftermath of another Max crash in October that pilots could regain control simply by following steps to turn off a specific anti-stall system. Flight ET302's final moments in the air Investigators are examining the crashes that killed all 346 aboard the 737 Max 8 jets operated by Indonesia's Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines, including the role of a flight-control system called MCAS, which under some circumstances could automatically turn the plane's nose down to prevent an aerodynamic stall. The Journal reported that data downloaded from the plane's black boxes indicates that the Ethiopian Airlines pilots followed recommendations to flip two switches that disconnected the system, but the plane kept sinking. They turned a manual wheel that adjusts the plane's tail, and used electric switches in an effort to climb, but that reactivated MCAS, which continued to push the plane's nose lower. Ethiopian investigators are expected to release their preliminary findings in the next few days. Boeing is the focus of investigations by the Justice Department, the Transportation Department's inspector general, and congressional committees. Investigations are also looking at the role of the Federal Aviation Administration, which certified the Max in 2017 and declined to ground it after the first deadly crash in October.  Sign up for your essential, twice-daily briefing from The Telegraph with our free Front Page newsletter.



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Anti-stall system active before Ethiopian 737 MAX crash: sources

Anti-stall system active before Ethiopian 737 MAX crash: sourcesData pulled from the Ethiopian Airlines flight recorder suggests the so-called MCAS system, which pushes the nose of the jet downwards, had been activated before the jet ploughed into a field outside Addis Ababa on March 10, the people said, speaking on condition of anonymity ahead of an interim official report. Boeing and the Federal Aviation Administration declined to comment on the data, first reported by the Wall Street Journal.



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Anti-stall system active before Ethiopian 737 MAX crash: sources

Anti-stall system active before Ethiopian 737 MAX crash: sourcesData pulled from the Ethiopian Airlines flight recorder suggests the so-called MCAS system, which pushes the nose of the jet downwards, had been activated before the jet ploughed into a field outside Addis Ababa on March 10, the people said, speaking on condition of anonymity ahead of an interim official report. Boeing and the Federal Aviation Administration declined to comment on the data, first reported by the Wall Street Journal.



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'Pitch up, pitch up': Final moments of Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max jet before crash

'Pitch up, pitch up': Final moments of Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max jet before crashA pilot on the Ethiopian Airlines flight which crashed three weeks ago was heard saying “pitch up, pitch up” just moments before the disaster, the Wall St Journal has reported.  The conversation happened when the plane was just 450ft (137m) off the ground as the aircraft begun to point downwards, according to the paper.  The plane's radio reportedly died moments after the comment was captured. All 157 people on board were killed when the Boeing 737 Max crashed.  The plane’s anti-stalling system, which sees its direction automatically righted if a sensor picks up the aircraft is tilting up too far, has been blamed for the disaster.  The investigation is on-going and no official cause for the crash has been made public.  Forensic experts work at the crash site of an Ethiopian airways operated by a Boeing 737 MAX aircraft Credit: TONY KARUMBA / AFP The Wall Street Journal reported on Friday that investigators have determined that the flight-control system on an Ethiopian Airlines jet automatically activated before the aircraft plunged into the ground on March 10. The preliminary conclusion was based on information from the aircraft's data and voice recorders and indicates a link between that accident and an earlier Lion Air crash in Indonesia, the newspaper said. Boeing and the Federal Aviation Administration declined to comment on the report. Also on Friday, The New York Times reported that the Ethiopian jet's data recorder yielded evidence that a sensor incorrectly triggered the anti-stall system, called the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System, or MCAS.  Once activated, the MCAS forced the plane into a dive and ultimately a crash that killed everyone on board, the newspaper said. Boeing is facing mounting pressure to roll out a software update on its best-selling plane in time for airlines to use the jets during the peak summer travel season. Kebebew Legesse, the mother of Ethiopian Airlines cabin crew Ayantu Girmay mourns at the scene of the Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET 302 plane crash Credit: REUTERS/Baz Ratner Company engineers and test pilots are working to fix anti-stall technology on the Boeing 737 Max that is suspected to have played a role in two deadly crashes in the last six months. Boeing is also seeing its own expenses rise, although it would not disclose how much it is costing the company to make the software fix and also train pilots how to use it. Cowen Research analysts say a "very rough guess" is that Boeing will pay about $ 2 billion after insurance to fix the plane, pay crash victims' families and compensate airlines that had to cancel flights. Most Wall Street analysts are betting that the planes will be flying again in less than three months, while noting that it could take longer in countries that plan to conduct their own reviews of Boeing's upgrade instead of taking the word of the U.S. regulator, the Federal Aviation Administration.



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Investigators believe Boeing anti-stall system was activated in Ethiopian crash: Report

Investigators believe Boeing anti-stall system was activated in Ethiopian crash: ReportIn a preliminary finding, officials investigating the crash of an Ethiopian airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 believe that a flight control feature designed to prevent a stall was activated before the plane nose-dived and crashed, The Wall Street Journal reports.



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A U.S. Lawsuit Targets Boeing Over the Deadly Ethiopian Airlines Crash

A U.S. Lawsuit Targets Boeing Over the Deadly Ethiopian Airlines CrashThe family of Jackson Musoni, a 31-year-old Rwandan national who was among the victims of the crash, filed the lawsuit



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UPDATE 2-U.S. lawsuit filed against Boeing over Ethiopian Airlines crash

UPDATE 2-U.S. lawsuit filed against Boeing over Ethiopian Airlines crashA lawsuit against Boeing Co was filed in U.S. federal court on Thursday in what appeared to be the first suit over a March 10 Ethiopian Airlines 737 MAX crash that killed 157 people. The lawsuit was filed in Chicago federal court by the family of Jackson Musoni, a citizen of Rwanda, and alleges that Boeing, which manufactures the 737 MAX, had defectively designed the automated flight control system. Boeing did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the lawsuit.



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Ethiopian official: Preliminary report on Boeing 737 MAX 8 crash due out this week

Ethiopian official: Preliminary report on Boeing 737 MAX 8 crash due out this weekA preliminary report on the crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 will be released this week, a spokesman for the country's transport ministry said.



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