Tag Archives: doomed

Pilot who hitched a ride in cockpit saved doomed Lion Air Boeing 737 Max day before it crashed

Pilot who hitched a ride in cockpit saved doomed Lion Air Boeing 737 Max day before it crashedAs the Lion Air crew fought to control their diving Boeing 737 Max 8, they got help from an unexpected source: an off-duty pilot who happened to be riding in the cockpit. That extra pilot, who was seated in the cockpit jumpseat, correctly diagnosed the problem and told the crew how to disable a malfunctioning flight-control system and save the plane, two people familiar with Indonesia’s investigation told Bloomberg. The next day, under command of a different crew facing what investigators said was an identical malfunction, the jetliner crashed into the Java Sea killing all 189 aboard. The previously undisclosed detail on the earlier Lion Air flight represents a new clue in the mystery of how some 737 Max pilots faced with the malfunction have been able to avert disaster while the others lost control of their planes and crashed. The presence of a third pilot in the cockpit wasn’t contained in Indonesia’s National Transportation Safety Committee’s November 28 report on the crash and hasn’t previously been reported. Airlines with Boeing 737 Max 8s in their fleet The so-called dead-head pilot on the earlier flight from Bali to Jakarta told the crew to cut power to the motor driving the nose down, according to the people familiar, part of a checklist that all pilots are required to memorise. “All the data and information that we have on the flight and the aircraft have been submitted to the Indonesian NTSC. We can’t provide additional comment at this stage due the ongoing investigation on the accident,” Lion Air spokesman Danang Prihantoro said. The Indonesia safety committee report said the plane had had multiple failures on previous flights and hadn’t been properly repaired. Representatives for Boeing and the Indonesian safety committee declined to comment on the earlier flight. The safety system, designed to keep planes from climbing too steeply and stalling, has come under scrutiny by investigators of the crash as well as a subsequent one less than five months later in Ethiopia. A malfunctioning sensor is believed to have tricked the Lion Air plane’s computers into thinking it needed to automatically bring the nose down to avoid a stall. Jakarta plane crash: Flight Lion Air JT610 Boeing’s 737 Max was grounded on March 13 by US regulatorsafter similarities to the Oct. 29 Lion Air crash emerged in the investigation of the March 10 crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302. In the wake of the two accidents, questions have emerged about how Boeing’s design of the new 737 model were approved. The Transportation Department’s inspector general is conducting a review of how the plane was certified to fly and a grand jury under the US Justice Department is also seeking records in a possible criminal probe of the plane’s certification. The FAA last week said it planned to mandate changes in the system to make it less likely to activate when there is no emergency. The agency and Boeing said they are also going to require additional training and references to it in flight manuals. “We will fully cooperate in the review in the Department of Transportation’s audit,” Boeing spokesman Charles Bickers said. The company has declined to comment on the criminal probe. After the Lion Air crash, two US pilots’ unions said the potential risks of the system, known as the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System, or MCAS, hadn’t been sufficiently spelled out in their manuals or training. None of the documentation for the Max aircraft included an explanation, the union leaders said. “We don’t like that we weren’t notified,’’ Jon Weaks, president of the Southwest Airlines Pilots Association, said in November. “It makes us question, ‘Is that everything, guys?’ I would hope there are no more surprises out there.’’ The Allied Pilots Association union at American Airlines Group Inc. also said details about the system weren’t included in the documentation about the plane. Following the Lion Air crash, the FAA required Boeing to notify airlines about the system and Boeing sent a bulletin to all customers flying the Max reminding them how to disable it in an emergency. Authorities have released few details about Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 other than it flew a “very similar” track as the Lion Air planes and then dove sharply into the ground. There have been no reports of maintenance issues with the Ethiopian Airlines plane before its crash. If the same issue is also found to have helped bring down Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, one of the most vexing questions crash investigators and aviation safety consultants are asking is why the pilots on that flight didn’t perform the checklist that disables the system. “After this horrific Lion Air accident, you’d think that everyone flying this airplane would know that’s how you turn this off,” said Steve Wallace, the former director of the US Federal Aviation Administration’s accident investigation branch. The combination of factors required to bring down a plane in these circumstances suggests other issues may also have occurred in the Ethiopia crash, said Jeffrey Guzzetti, who also directed accident investigations at FAA and is now a consultant. “It’s simply implausible that this MCAS deficiency by itself can down a modern jetliner with a trained crew,” Guzzetti said. MCAS is driven by a single sensor near the nose that measures the so-called angle of attack, or whether air is flowing parallel to the length of the fuselage or at an angle. On the Lion Air flights, the angle-of-attack sensor had failed and was sending erroneous readings indicating the plane’s nose was pointed dangerously upward. Sign up for your essential, twice-daily briefing from The Telegraph with our free Front Page newsletter.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Exclusive: High speed, then a failed climb for doomed Ethiopia flight

Exclusive: High speed, then a failed climb for doomed Ethiopia flightA voice from the cockpit of the Boeing 737 MAX requested to climb to 14,000 feet above sea level – about 6,400 feet above the airport – before urgently asking to return, the source told Reuters on condition of anonymity because the recording is part of an ongoing investigation. Addis Ababa is surrounded by hills and, immediately to the north, the Entoto Mountains.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Exclusive: High speed, then a failed climb for doomed Ethiopia flight

Exclusive: High speed, then a failed climb for doomed Ethiopia flightA voice from the cockpit of the Boeing 737 MAX requested to climb to 14,000 feet above sea level – about 6,400 feet above the airport – before urgently asking to return, the source told Reuters on condition of anonymity because the recording is part of an ongoing investigation. Addis Ababa is surrounded by hills and, immediately to the north, the Entoto Mountains.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

House Passes Year-End Tax Legislation That’s Seen as Doomed in Senate

House Passes Year-End Tax Legislation That’s Seen as Doomed in SenateThe Republican-controlled Senate has shown little interest in taking up the House’s package before members leave for the recess, even after the outgoing chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, Kevin Brady, revised the package and included certain tax extenders to appease more moderate Senate GOP lawmakers. Brady had hoped that some of his tax package could be included in a year-end spending bill, but debate about border wall funding overshadowed smaller priorities.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Doomed Lion Air jet was 'not airworthy' on penultimate flight

Doomed Lion Air jet was 'not airworthy' on penultimate flightA Lion Air jet that crashed into the sea off Indonesia last month was not in an airworthy condition on its second-to-last flight.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Doomed Lion Air jet was 'not airworthy' on penultimate flight: investigators

Doomed Lion Air jet was 'not airworthy' on penultimate flight: investigatorsA preliminary report unveiled fresh details of efforts by pilots to steady the jet as they reported a “flight control problem”, including the captain’s last words to air traffic control asking to be cleared to “five thou” or 5,000 feet. Indonesia’s transport safety committee (KNKT) focused on airline maintenance and training and the response of a Boeing anti-stall system to a recently replaced sensor but did not give a cause for the crash that killed all 189 people on board. “At this stage I do not have the answer,” KNKT investigator Nurcahyo Utomo told reporters.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Indonesia says situation facing crew of doomed Lion Air jet not in flight manual

Indonesia says situation facing crew of doomed Lion Air jet not in flight manualThe comments shed further light on the areas under scrutiny as investigators prepare to publish their preliminary report on Nov. 28 or 29, one month after the Lion Air Boeing 737 MAX dived into the Java Sea, killing all 189 on board. Now the investigation’s focus appears to be expanding to the clarity of U.S.-approved procedures to help pilots prevent the 737 MAX over-reacting to such a data loss, and methods for training them. Dennis Tajer, a 737 captain and spokesman for Allied Pilots Association (APA), which represents American Airlines Group Inc pilots, said his union was informed after the crash about a new system Boeing had installed on 737 MAX jets that could command the plane’s nose down in certain situations to prevent a stall.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Man says traffic made him miss doomed Lion Air crash, believed to have killed everyone on board

Man says traffic made him miss doomed Lion Air crash, believed to have killed everyone on boardA man who was supposed to be on the Lion Air jet that crashed on Monday



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Traffic saved Indonesian man from doomed Lion Air flight

Traffic saved Indonesian man from doomed Lion Air flightAn Indonesian man has described how Jakarta’s notorious traffic inadvertently saved his life on Monday after he arrived too late to catch the doomed Lion Air plane which plunged into the sea minutes after taking off. Sony Setiawan, an official in Indonesia’s finance ministry, had meant to be on board the ill-fated flight JT610, a journey he and his colleagues caught on a weekly basis. “I usually take (flight) JT610 — my friends and I always take this plane,” Setiawan told AFP.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

MH370 captain 'deliberately evaded radar' during final moments of doomed flight

MH370 captain 'deliberately evaded radar' during final moments of doomed flightAviation experts believe they may have solved the mystery of the disappearance of flight MH370, saying the 239 passengers and crew were the victims of a deliberate, criminal act carried out by the plane’s captain. The fate of the Boeing 777 has mystified investigators ever since it went missing en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing in 2014. However, a panel of experts assembled for the Australian TV programme 60 Minutes says the evidence suggests Captain Zaharie Amad Shah executed a careful series of manoeuvres to evade detection and ensure the plane disappeared in a remote location. Martin Dolan, former head of the Australia Transport Safety Bureau, who led the two-year search for the missing plane, said: “This was planned, this was deliberate, and it was done over an extended period of time.” The plane was presumed to have flown on autopilot before running out of fuel and plunging into the southern Indian Ocean. However, the wreckage has never been found and the search was suspended in January last year. The search for MH370 The panel suggested a more gradual descent could mean the search was concentrated in the wrong area and that the plane could still be found largely intact. Simon Hardy, a Boeing 777 instructor, said Captain Zaharie avoided detection by flying a careful course along the winding border between Malaysian and Thai air space, crossing in and out of radar cover on either side. “So both of the controllers aren’t bothered about this mysterious aircraft. Cause it’s, ‘Oh, it's gone. It’s not in our space any more,’” he told the programme, which was broadcast on Sunday. Survey ship HMS Echo and a Lockheed P-3 Orion during the early days of the search in the southern Indian Ocean Credit: Press Association “If you were commissioning me to do this operation and try and make a 777 disappear, I would do exactly the same thing.” He also pointed out the Malaysian captain had made an unexplained turn to fly over his home town of Penang. “Somebody was looking out the window, It might be a long, emotional goodbye or a short, emotional goodbye to his home town,” he said. A modern mystery | Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 Larry Vance, a veteran air crash investigator, told the programme the public could be confident in a growing consensus about the plane’s final moments and that the pilot was intent on killing himself. “Unfortunately, he was killing everybody else on board, and he did it deliberately,” he added.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines