Tag Archives: deported

Germany drops probe of former Nazi guard deported from US


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Germany: Nazi guard deported from US agrees to be questioned


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Hundreds deported under Biden, including witness to massacre


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The U.S. Deported The Man Who Would Become China’s ‘Father of Space Technology’ Out of Fear


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Black woman deported after facing backlash for viral Bali post


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94-year-old former Nazi concentration camp guard to be deported from US to Germany


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Advocates: Honduran mother, children deported to Guatemala

Advocates: Honduran mother, children deported to GuatemalaA Honduran mother and her two children who had been hospitalized have been deported to Guatemala under a Trump administration policy of sending some people seeking asylum in the U.S. to third countries, advocates for the mother said Tuesday. U.S. District Judge Micaela Alvarez did not rule on their request prior to Tuesday, the day the government had said it intended to remove the mother and her two children, ages 1 and 6, under a plan to send families to different countries so they can seek asylum elsewhere. The 1-year-old was diagnosed with the flu, while the 6-year-old had diarrhea and a fever, according to Dr. Amy Cohen, executive director of the immigrant advocacy group Every Last One.



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Northeastern College Student Deported to Iran Despite Judge’s Order

Northeastern College Student Deported to Iran Despite Judge’s OrderThe attorneys for a 24-year-old Iranian national and Northeastern University student who inspired protests at Boston Logan International Airport over the weekend said their client was deported late Monday in spite of a federal court order.Shahab Dehghani was detained Sunday night at about 5 p.m. when he arrived to study economics at the private school on a valid F1 student visa. He was held for secondary questioning by federal agents, and more than 100 people reportedly came out to demonstrate on his behalf outside of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) area of the airport for at least three hours on Monday. Protesters chanted “let Shahab in,” “do the right thing,” “stop deporting students,” and “let him in!”Dehghani was ordered removed from the U.S. without his having access to a lawyer, WBUR reported, but his attorneys, Susan Church and Kerry Doyle, filed an emergency federal petition on his behalf Monday night. The filing claimed CBP agents violated Dehghani’s rights when they detained him at the airport in the first place.U.S. District Court Judge Allison Burroughs granted the order, scheduled a hearing in Boston federal court at 10 a.m. on Tuesday to discuss the matter, and appeared to delay Dehghani’s removal.“It is not a total victory. It is a partial victory,” Church told a crowd of protesters on Monday night, according to MassLive.com.Despite that order, Church said on Twitter Tuesday morning that Shahab Dehghani was “removed from the U.S. at 10:03 p.m.” Monday after agents told “multiple attorneys” that he was taken off the plane about 30 minutes earlier.Church tweeted on Tuesday morning: “THEY LIED.”A CBP spokesperson said in a statement that the agency could not confirm or deny that Dehghani was even in custody, citing the Privacy Act.“Applicants must demonstrate they are admissible into the U.S. by overcoming all grounds of inadmissibility including health-related grounds, criminality, security reasons, public charge, labor certification, illegal entrants and immigration violations, documentation requirements, and miscellaneous grounds,” the statement said.Judge Richard G. Stearns reportedly dismissed the case during a Tuesday morning hearing, declaring the issue moot—since Dehghani had already been deported—and noting that he did not believe he had the authority to order CBP to allow for the student’s return, according to WBUR.During the 10 a.m. hearing in Boston federal court, CBP attorneys also disputed the timeline presented by Dehghani’s attorneys, one of whom said Massachusetts Sen. Ed Markey received confirmation that the emergency stay order was granted before the flight took off, WBUR reported. In court, the agency’s attorneys reportedly claimed that Dehghani’s plane left before the order was issued.“We are aware that a Northeastern University student who is an Iranian citizen has been denied entry to the United States,” school spokeswoman Shannon Nargi said in a statement to The Daily Beast. “Northeastern welcomes thousands of international students and supports them with an array of resources. We have been in touch with federal officials to learn more about this case and to provide our student with the appropriate assistance to facilitate a successful return to Northeastern.”Dehghani previously attended University of Massachusetts Boston and was in the country for more than two years before he returned to Iran to visit family in December 2018, MassLive.com reported.Massachusetts Senator and Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren recently requested more information from CBP about additional security measures that may target Iranian travelers entering the country. The Guardian reported that the U.S. has deported at least 10 Iranian students with valid visas since August—despite the lengthy and intense approval process it takes to acquire that paperwork. Seven of those students had reportedly flown into Logan International Airport in Boston, and some now allege serious infractions by an individual CBP officer at the Boston airport, the newspaper reported.Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.



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Army Officer Rushes Home to See Mom—Before She Is Deported to Mexico

Army Officer Rushes Home to See Mom—Before She Is Deported to MexicoU.S. Army 2nd Lt. Gibram Cruz arrived home to California from his posting in Arizona last week. The reason for the visit wasn’t the holidays; he would be back on base before then. The purpose was to see his mother, who is about to be deported from the country he serves to protect.“I’m here essentially to say goodbye to my mom,” the 30-year-old army officer told The San Diego Union-Tribune on Sunday.Rocio Rebollar Gomez, 50, is an undocumented immigrant who has lived in San Diego on and off for over 30 years. She owns a business and a house in the United States, and raised her three children here, and she has no criminal record. But on Dec. 4, she was ordered to self-deport to Mexico within the month—and the federal government refused to grant her discretionary protections provided for relatives of military service members that would allow her to stay longer. “Honestly I am worn out. I feel like my life is gone and everything I have is here—my whole life,” Gomez told The Daily Beast on Monday.“I cannot eat, I cannot sleep, my life is on hold. No one should be going through what I am going through.”She is expected to return to her native Acapulco, Mexico—a once tourist-filled beachside city that has since become overrun by cartel violence—on Jan. 2.Immigrant Advocates Use Temporary Reprieve to Prep Families at Risk for Deportation“They are using her immigration status to override all of the hardwork and the life she created in the United States,” her attorney, Tessa Cabrera, told The Daily Beast on Monday. “Her son is worried that his military status and title will threaten her safety in Mexico, but there is nothing we can do.“We’re hoping for a miracle.”According to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services website, the “Patrol in Place” program makes parents, spouses, widows, or children of active-duty U.S. armed forces members eligible for discretionary deferred action for up to two years. “We recognize the important sacrifices made by U.S. service members, veterans, enlistees, and their families,” the agency’s website says. “To support these individuals, we provide discretionary options such as parole in place or deferred action on a case-by-case basis.”According to Cabrera, ICE has denied Gomez the protection because she has not passed the threshold of 10 years of continuous presence in the United States. A USCIS spokesperson declined to comment, citing the ongoing investigation. Gomez’s deportation is especially heartbreaking for her military son since he cannot travel to visit his mother in Mexico. As an intelligence officer, the 30-year-old must adhere to military travel restrictions and a lengthy process to leave the country. “He has no idea how when and how he is going to see his mother after she is sent back to Mexico,” Cabrera said.ICE Ran Fake College to Target Undocumented Immigrants“My son is heartbroken,” Gomez added. “He doesn't understand why this is happening to me, a woman devoted to God and work.”Cabrera said the December decision to deny her client’s petition to stay is the end of a years-long battle to keep the grandmother of three in the United States. The process—which included Gomez’s detention for over a month—also drew the interest of two members of Congress, who asked ICE for discretion. Gomez first arrived in the United States in 1988. Seven years later, she was picked up during an immigration raid at a hotel where she worked while seven months pregnant with her youngest daughter.That same day, she was deported to Mexico. With her two children still in the U.S., Gomez had no choice but to re-enter the country illegally, Cabrera said. She was removed from the United States two more times over the last two decades, re-entering to be with her family and starting her life over each time. Cabrera said one of those removals involved several armed immigration officials coming to the family’s home early on Saturday morning—an image she says still haunts her client’s three children. But Gomez continued to persevere, running her own natural products business and driving more than eight hours a day for Uber. “All my hard work has been to give my children the chance for a better future and to make them good citizens,” Gomez said. In April 2018, however, Gomez was detained for a third time and immediately placed in a San Diego Detention center for over a month. Cruz, who just finished his four years in the army, decided to take a commission and remain in the military. He said one of the main reasons he decided to stay was the immigration perk granted to relatives of active-duty service members. “I joined to serve the country and keep my family safe,” Cruz told the Union-Tribune. “Now, I’m facing dangers here on my home front.”Cabrera said her first attempt in 2018 to prevent Gomez’ department was trying to establish her reasonable fear of returning to Mexico. Her brother was abducted by a cartel, and though the family paid almost $ 10,000 for his return, his body has never been found. That year, Acapulco had the third highest number of homicides in Mexico and the highest homicide rate of the country’s most violent cities, a University of San Diego report stated. Gomez stated her fears during a reasonable threat interview with an ICE officer in the hopes of being granted asylum. She was denied.“That unfortunately didn’t meet the threshold for reasonable fear. So at that point there was nothing really to do with her,” Cabrera said. The attorney said she immediately applied for a deferred action, but her requests for appointment about the case, inquiries about the status of her application, and general questions about the time-table were ignored. “Every-time they told me it’s pending, it’s pending,” she said. Washington Man Accused of Hurling Molotov Cocktails at ICE Detention Center Killed by PoliceIn October, Cabrera said she got an ICE letter, ordering her and her client to appear the following month for Gomez’s “interview and removal, that’s what they called it.” The appointment was moved back to Dec. 4, but one day before the meeting, Cabrera officially learned her client’s petition was going to be denied.“I got word she was denied at about 1 p.m. the day before her hearing—they didn’t say why. So immediately I put together another packet for a deferred action to reapply,” she said.The next morning, a USCIS official who reviewed Gomez’s case said she wasn't protected by the “Patrol in Place” police. When Cabrera countered she had re-filed her stay of removal request with “about 200 pages” in documents supporting her case, the official verbally denied her within two hours.“I am translating it to her as the officer is denying our last effort and she is freaking out because she thinks she has to leave right away,” Cabrera said, adding the officer informed her that her client had 30 days to self-surrender for deportation.Equipped with an ankle bracelet and strict orders not to leave the San Diego area, Gomez now is trying to enjoy her family for the last few days before she is forced to return to Mexico, her attorney said. After saying goodbye to her only son on Sunday, her two daughters are planning to spend the holiday at her house.“My one wish is a miracle to stay,” Gomez said.Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. 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Double-murderer deported to Germany after decades in US jail

Double-murderer deported to Germany after decades in US jailA German man who has served 33 years in a US prison for a double murder arrived back in Germany on Tuesday, after receiving parole. Officials in the state of Virginia allowed 53-year-old Jens Soering, the son of a diplomat, to be released on parole. “I’m so happy to be in Germany after 33 years in prison in the US,” he told journalists in a short statement at Frankfurt Airport.



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