Tag Archives: colleges

Colleges are using federal stimulus money to clear students’ past-due debts – an economist answers five questions


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Colleges with no vaccine or mask mandates roil parents and professors: ‘I’m terrified’


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Should colleges require students to get the COVID vaccine?


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Amendment Defunding Colleges ‘Discriminating’ Against Asian American Students Voted Down


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Biden order could change how colleges handle sex misconduct


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Trump Highlights Support for Black Colleges: Campaign Update

Trump Highlights Support for Black Colleges: Campaign Update(Bloomberg) — President Donald Trump is seeking to appeal to African American voters by highlighting funding for historically black colleges and criminal justice reform, even as polls show he faces an uphill battle.As part of the effort, White House advisers on Thursday said Trump pushed Congress to provide $ 75 million for his First Step program, which gives inmates a personalized assessment and recidivism reduction program. “The president’s leadership on this issue is fundamentally changing the future of our criminal justice system,” Jared Kushner, a White House senior adviser and the president’s son-in-law, said in a statement.Separately, the Trump administration has sought to highlight legislation permanently restoring annual funding to historically black colleges and universities, though that effort hit a snag. The White House planned an event Tuesday for black university leaders to celebrate the president signing the bill — only to have the ceremony scuttled by last-minute legislative maneuvering that left Trump without anything to sign. He ended up inviting guests to the Oval Office for a private meet and greet instead. On Thursday, he signed the legislation and issued a statement celebrating the bill.Trump alluded to the aborted event during his rally in Michigan on Wednesday night, saying the “only bad thing” about the bill is that the university leaders wouldn’t come lobby him each year any more.Trump won about 8% of the black vote in 2016, and Democrats have sought to capitalize on the president’s polarizing rhetoric on race. Last month, his campaign created a group, “Black Voices for Trump,” to advocate for the president’s re-election — after a September poll by the Associated Press and NORC at the University of Chicago showed that 92% of African Americans disapprove of Trump’s handling of race relations.Warren Staff Say Backers List Had Errors (5:05 p.m.)Elizabeth Warren’s campaign said it made a mistake by including Democratic donor and political activist Ed Buck, who’s facing criminal charges over the death of two men, in a list of endorsements she received from alumni of Barack Obama’s administration and campaign.On Wednesday, Warren released a list of about 200 former Obama staffers who signed on to support her 2020 bid. Buck was on the list, even though he is being held without bail on charges involving the death of two men who fatally overdosed at his Los Angeles home in 2017.The Warren campaign said someone added fake names to the list that was being compiled by volunteers who used to work for Obama. The volunteers caught most of them, but missed Buck, the campaign said.“This was a mistake considering Ed Buck was not staff or an alum,” campaign representative Chris Hayden said in a statement. “This was put together via Google Doc by some Obama alums and they caught some non-staff that populated the list but obviously they missed one. They are removing it.” — Misyrlena EgkolfopoulouBloomberg Offers Public Health-Insurance Option (2:27 p.m.)Democratic presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg would create a “Medicare-like” public health-insurance option, rejecting the progressive notion of government-run health insurance that replaces private coverage.Bloomberg’s campaign said it’s still figuring out how much his plan would cost, but estimated about $ 1.5 trillion over 10 years, offset partly by cost savings from capping out-of-network charges and negotiating prescription drug prices. Some revenue would come from a forthcoming tax plan, and he intends to raise enough money to pay for the policy proposals, the campaign said.The former New York mayor’s plan is similar to those proposed by Joe Biden, Pete Buttigieg and other 2020 candidates who oppose the government-run system championed by Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders. Elizabeth Warren is proposing a public option for the first three years of a Warren presidency until she can enact Medicare-for-all.Bloomberg’s plan would create a public option run by the government but funded by consumer premiums to cover people, including those in states that didn’t expand Medicaid. It would also build on the Affordable Care Act in part by expanding subsidies, and Bloomberg would increase enrollment efforts rather than reinstate the law’s individual mandate.Bloomberg has said a Medicare-for-all system would cost trillions of dollars and “bankrupt us for a very long time.” He’s advocating a “practical, achievable plan” to move toward universal coverage and lower costs.“We don’t need Medicare-for-All proposals that are more likely to re-elect Donald Trump than to expand coverage,” Bloomberg said while discussing his plan in Memphis, Tennessee, on Thursday.Bloomberg is the founder and majority owner of Bloomberg LP, the parent company of Bloomberg News. — Mark NiquetteBiden Tops All Other Democrats in National Poll (7:18 a.m.)Former Vice President Joe Biden remains the top pick nationally for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination, according to a new Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll.Biden was backed by 28% of voters surveyed. His closest rivals were Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders — the top choice of 21% of respondents — and Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren, who was favored by 18%. Biden, Warren and Sanders were the only three candidates to win double-digit support.Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg garnered 4% support, behind South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg, who drew 9%, and Senator Amy Klobuchar, who registered 5%.Bloomberg is the founder and majority owner of Bloomberg LP, the parent company of Bloomberg News.The poll of 410 registered voters who said they would participate in a Democratic caucus or primary was conducted Dec. 14-17 and has a margin of error of plus-or-minus 4.84 percentage points. — Kathleen MillerBooker to Air His First TV Ad During Debate (7 a.m.)Cory Booker didn’t make the cut for the Democratic debate Thursday, but he still wants voters to hear his message thanks to a television ad that will be broadcast during the event.The campaign commercial, entitled “Together,” centers on Booker’s intention to stay in the race even though he won’t be on the debate stage at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. It will appear in the four early voting states — Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina and Nevada — and in New York City, Washington and Los Angeles.“You’re only going to see this ad once because I’m not a billionaire,” Booker says. “I won’t be on tonight’s debate stage, but that’s OK because I’m going to win this election anyway.”To be eligible to take part in the sixth Democratic debate, candidates had to receive donations from 200,000 individuals and reach 4% in four polls approved by the Democratic National Committee or 6% in two-DNC approved polls of early states. Booker obtained the donor minimum but did not reach 4% in any DNC-approved polls by the deadline. — Emma KineryCOMING UPBiden, Warren, Sanders, Buttigieg, Klobuchar, Andrew Yang and Tom Steyer will participate in the final Democratic presidential debate of 2019 in Los Angeles on Thursday.(Michael Bloomberg is also seeking the Democratic presidential nomination. Bloomberg is the founder and majority owner of Bloomberg LP, the parent company of Bloomberg News.)\–With assistance from Emma Kinery, Kathleen Miller, Mark Niquette and Misyrlena Egkolfopoulou.To contact the reporters on this story: Justin Sink in Washington at jsink1@bloomberg.net;Jennifer Jacobs in Washington at jjacobs68@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Wendy Benjaminson at wbenjaminson@bloomberg.net, John HarneyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.



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Cory Booker Bets $100 Billion on Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Cory Booker Bets $  100 Billion on Historically Black Colleges and UniversitiesSen. Cory Booker of New Jersey on Tuesday proposed investing $ 100 billion in historically black colleges and universities and other minority-serving institutions, a broad proposal in a Democratic field that has offered varying plans to prop up this long-standing yet struggling arm of the educational system.Many HBCUs, as historically black colleges and universities are commonly known, have faced widespread financial woes recently, with some schools losing accreditation and facing plummeting enrollment.Booker's proposal comes at a precarious time for his presidential campaign: Despite crossing the 200,000 individual-donor threshold last month, he is still short four qualifying polls for the December debate and is in real danger of being left off the stage.While many candidates, including Sens. Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts; former Vice President Joe Biden; and Mayor Pete Buttigieg, of South Bend, Indiana, have already rolled out proposals to invest billions into HBCUs, an anchor of Booker's proposal is dedicating at least $ 40 billion to those institutions for climate change research.Booker's plan also calls for an additional $ 30 billion in grants to expand and improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics — known as STEM education — at HBCUs and minority-serving institutions, and another $ 30 billion in grants to upgrade facilities and infrastructure at the schools."HBCUs make our country stronger and more reflective of the diversity that makes us so great," Booker said in a statement announcing the proposal. "I am here today because of the power of these institutions to uplift and bring about opportunity to black Americans."More than 70% of students at HBCUs and minority-serving institutions rely on Pell Grants, according to Marybeth Gasman, an education professor at Rutgers University. The Booker campaign aims to expand access to college by doubling the value of Pell Grants to $ 12,400 from $ 6,200 and require that 10% of Second Chance Pell Grant programs are given to HBCUs and minority-serving institutions."It's the most aggressive plan," Gasman said. "Of course it's coming out after the others, so I think that's a smart and bold move on his part."Indeed, discussion about the many ways the Democratic candidates have proposed to bolster HBCUs has become a central topic in the Democratic presidential primary.Warren committed to investing a minimum of $ 50 billion into HBCUs, paid for by her wealth tax proposal, within her overarching plan to make public college free and to cancel most student loan debt. She said she would seek to increase the budget with her secretary of education to ensure equity in spending per student compared with other colleges in a given area.Sanders, who also proposed universal free public college and canceling all student loan debt, pledged to make similar investments in HBCUs with a focus on educating teachers and those in the medical field. In addition, Sanders also proposed canceling the $ 1.6 billion in existing loan debt HBCUs face through the current Capital Financing Program.Last month, Buttigieg wrote an op-ed in The Baltimore Sun, also promising to invest $ 50 billion in HBCUs.Biden proposed more than $ 70 billion in investments for HBCUs, with dedicated funds to specific needs, such as $ 10 billion to create at least 200 new research incubators; $ 20 billion in high-tech labs, facilities and digital infrastructure; and another $ 18 billion in grants to help with tuition at four-year colleges, equivalent to up to two years of tuition per low-income and middle-class students.Some experts, while lauding the financial scope of Booker's plan, questioned whether focusing so much of the funding on STEM programs and climate change studies was the best solution for many of the HBCUs around the country."There are maybe 10 to 20 HBCUs facing being shuttered that don't have those fields," said Jerry Crawford II, a professor of journalism and a director of the multicultural scholars program at the University of Kansas.Of course, underpinning all of these proposals is the difficulty in paying for them. Booker's campaign said he would request $ 100 billion over 10 years from Congress in his first budget and has identified other sources of new revenue in previous policy proposals, such as undoing President Donald Trump's tax cuts and restoring the estate tax to 2009 levels."If Sen. Booker could pull off this kind of investment in HBCUs," said Gasman, "it would be historic."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company



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U.S. presidential hopeful Harris would spend $60 billion on historically black colleges

U.S. presidential hopeful Harris would spend $  60 billion on historically black collegesDemocratic presidential hopeful Kamala Harris will unveil a plan on Friday to invest $ 60 billion in historically black colleges and universities if elected, the latest effort by the U.S. senator from California to reach out to black voters. Harris is one of two dozen Democrats in a field led by former Vice President Joe Biden seeking the Democratic nomination to challenge Republican President Donald Trump in the November 2020 election.



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College admissions scandal: Will the students stay in school? Colleges don't have to say

College admissions scandal: Will the students stay in school? Colleges don't have to sayTwo universities say they have booted students, but colleges don't have to give details of disciplinary decisions. Here's why they're staying quiet.



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Colleges weigh fate of students with tainted applications

Colleges weigh fate of students with tainted applicationsBOSTON (AP) — In the wake of a massive college bribery scheme, the schools caught in the middle have been left facing a thorny question: What to do about the students who may have been admitted through fraud?



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