Tag Archives: cold

Nato says Russia in breach of Cold War-era nuclear treaty as US says it will suspend participation

Nato says Russia in breach of Cold War-era nuclear treaty as US says it will suspend participationNato has accused Russia of violating a landmark Cold War-era nuclear treaty, paving the way for the US to leave the pact. US secretary of state Mike Pompeo said America would suspend its treaty obligations in 60 days over the alleged violations. The six-month withdrawal period from the 1987 Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces Treaty (INF) would begin after this point.



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George HW Bush death: Former US president who oversaw end of Cold War dies aged 94

George HW Bush death: Former US president who oversaw end of Cold War dies aged 94George HW Bush – the 41st president of the United States – has died at the age of 94. The elder of the two Bush presidents served during a time of rapidly shifting geopolitics – the USSR unravelled and the Berlin Wall came down during his term – but he failed to win re-election after the economy worsened. A now notorious comment – “Read my lips: no new taxes” – that he made at the 1988 Republican Party Convention but which he had to backtrack on two years later, came to hang around his neck.



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George HW Bush death: Former US president who oversaw end of Cold War dies aged 94

George HW Bush death: Former US president who oversaw end of Cold War dies aged 94George HW Bush – the 41st president of the United States – has died at the age of 94. The elder of the two Bush presidents served during a time of rapidly shifting geopolitics – the USSR unravelled and the Berlin Wall came down during his term – but he failed to win re-election after the economy worsened. A now notorious comment – “Read my lips: no new taxes” – that he made at the 1988 Republican Party Convention but which he had to backtrack on two years later, came to hang around his neck.



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Migrant caravan faces cold welcome, few options at US-Mexico border

Migrant caravan faces cold welcome, few options at US-Mexico borderAfter spending more than a month traveling the 4,300 kilometers (2,700 miles) to the Mexican border city of Tijuana, walking and hitch-hiking much of the way, thousands of migrants faced the bleak reality that their American dream was about as untouchable as it was when they started. Osman Bueso, a 28-year-old Honduran man who was one of the first to reach the border, said he had no intention of waiting the months or years it could take to seek asylum in the US, and was ready to try to crash the border, as the migrants did when they entered Mexico from Guatemala on October 19.



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Cold War II: Trump threat to pull out of INF Treaty could set off new arms race

Cold War II: Trump threat to pull out of INF Treaty could set off new arms raceThe Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty banning medium-range missiles in Europe is far from perfect, and Russia clearly was cheating on it – but experts say it serves a purpose.



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Husband who claimed cold medicine made him stab his wife 123 times pleads guilty to her murder

Husband who claimed cold medicine made him stab his wife 123 times pleads guilty to her murderA North Carolina man who claimed a large dose of cold medicine caused him to



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Gavin Williamson commits extra British troops in Ukraine to stop Russia 'reversing Cold War outcome'

Gavin Williamson commits extra British troops in Ukraine to stop Russia 'reversing Cold War outcome'Only a month ago, a Ukrainian soldier was killed by sniper fire at the spot where Gavin Williamson, the Defence Secretary, is now standing. This is the front line of the West’s new war with Russia. Two hundred yards away, Russian-backed separatists are in position, their sniper rifles at the ready. Protected by helmet and body armour, Mr Williamson is surveying the remains of a hospital, its walls bullet-riddled and the windows blown out. Separatist fighters had targeted it with mortars  and machine gun fire from across the fields that now represent an illegal de facto border between Ukraine and Russian-occupied territory outside Marinka, a satellite town about three miles to the west of Donetsk.  Mr Williamson had deployed forward from the safety of Kiev, Ukraine’s capital city, to see for himself the effects of what he called Russia’s “brazen and reckless” act of initiating the conflict in the east of the country.  Britain will increase military support to its ally by sending Royal Marines later this year and increase the presence of Royal Navy patrols in the Black Sea in 2019.  Odessa, Ukraine’s biggest port, located in the west of the country, is expected to come under pressure from the Russian Navy over the coming months as they try to effect an economic blockade. Gavin Williamson with troops in the contested region of Ukraine. September 18th 2018. Tension with Russia after Ukraine’s Maidan Revolution in 2014 led to separatists, backed by regular Russian military units, seizing Crimea and a large swathe of Ukrainian territory along the border. More than 10,000 lives have been lost in the conflict. Mr Williamson’s Ukrainian hosts watched nervously as the Secretary of State surveyed the damage, mindful that he stay on the paved surface. The fields either side are now feared to have been planted with landmines hidden beneath the soil.  The Ukrainian soldier killed last month had been shot at from a house on the Russian separatist side of the frontline. Mr Williamson became on Tuesday the first western minister outside of Ukraine to experience the frontline – and Vladimir Putin’s land grab – at such close proximity. He may as well have been sauntering down Whitehall. “The Kremlin is trying to undermine our values, destroy our way of life, and reverse the outcome of the Cold War,” said Mr Williamson, 42. “Its behaviour only increases the risk of miscalculation and the prospect of crisis turning to chaos.”  There needs to be a response to Russian encroachment. We’ve got to make it clear that there is a price to be paid for such actionsDefence Secretary Gavin Williamson The Mi-8 Hip helicopter taking us east towards the 300 mile-long Line of Control, the new, illegal border with Russia, had raced forward at 120 knots, pulling up sharply to get over trees and power lines. Twenty-six Ukrainian aircraft have been shot down by Russian-supplied surface to air missiles since the conflict started, so the pilots take no chances and cling to the safety of the folds in the earth.  Some 35,000 Russian-backed separatists and an estimated 4,000 regular Russian troops are located in the Donetsk and Luhansk regions of eastern Ukraine. Holding them back are around 60,000 Ukrainian forces. The Kremlin tried to break the will of the Ukrainian people, Mr Williamson said, but the nation came together against such a blatant act of aggression. “What you’ve seen is an independent free nation that has been attacked by a powerful neighbour and we’ve seen men and women come together to repel that invasion and push back those that would wish to do them harm,” he told the Telegraph, accompanying him on the visit.   “Vladimir Putin and his cronies around him want to abuse their power. This is not the type of behaviour we expect of any nation, let alone one that sits as a permanent member of the Security Council. [Russia is becoming] a pariah nation.”  The Defence Secretary receives a brief in a hardened bunker from the Ukrainian General in command of the operational area.  Around 300,000 people live without clean water after the treatment plant supplying this region of Ukraine was destroyed by shelling. Just inside Russia an estimated 700 tanks are available to push further into Ukraine should the order come. Cyber attacks are common with Ukrainian military personnel regularly harassed on their personal mobile phones. The message from Russia is clear: we can get to you any time we want.   Russia’s military intelligence arm, the GRU, blamed by Britain for the nerve agent attack in Salisbury, is also present. Two GRU operatives were caught inside Ukraine in 2016 and exchanged for a pilot that had been shot down. They are all constant reminders of how easily Russia and the separatists can raise or lower the pressure, according to the wider agenda of destabilising Ukraine and making it an unattractive prospect for Nato or EU membership.  Gavin Williamson stayed at the front line for about 20 minutes, accompanied by Ukraine’s Joint Force Operation Commander, Lieutenant General Serhiy Nayev. The protection party of around 50 soldiers, scanning the scrub and battered buildings nearby for signs of movement, were eager to move on.  Four years of war in Europe: A photo dispatch from the frontline in Ukraine Despite all the security measures, including having two Mi-24 Hind helicopter gunships cover our approach, the soldiers admitted Russia probably knew the British Defence Secretary was here. To attack the British minister would, of course, be an outrageous and provocative act, but after Salisbury all rules have changed. Mr Williamson was undeterred and happy to stay chatting with Ukrainian troops. “We have common values and we believe in standing up for those common values,” he said, “It’s important that we stand up for the international rules-based order. “There is a constant pattern where Russia is pushing the boundaries of acceptable behaviour [and] there needs to be a response to Russian encroachment. We’ve got to make it clear that there is a price to be paid for such actions.”  Mr Williamson is in no doubt that blame lies directly with Mr Putin. “The behaviour of the Putin-led regime is not acceptable. We want to be able to ensure that the people who are on the front line, where we are today, have the best ability to survive and defend their homeland.” He also fears Mr Putin is widening his new Cold War with the West. Mr Williamson added: “We’re seeing Russian aggression, not just on the front line but an increasingly more assertive posture in the Black Sea. They want to open up new fronts.” Gavin Williamson is shown the last checkpoint on the Ukrainian side of the contested Line of Control. The Russian-backed separatist checkpoint is 300m further down the road.  The Defence Secretary is pledging to stand firm. “We’re going to be upping our training and support efforts with the Royal Navy and Royal Marines, making sure that the Ukrainian Navy and Ukrainian forces have the skills and the technical ability to deal with these increasing threats.” Mr Williamson was criticised in the past for saying Russia should “go away and shut up”. Invited by the Telegraph to repeat his suggestion at full volume towards the trenches just a few hundred yards away, he politely declined.  It was time to get back in the heavily armoured vehicles and head West, to the relative safety of Kiev. Mr Williamson’s full-throated support for his Ukrainian hosts and promise of increased British military personnel had earned much praise. “You are very brave for coming here,” one Ukrainian soldier told him.  “Our commitment remains unwavering,” Gavin Williamson said. “As long as the danger lasts we will continue to stand by your side. The safer you are here, the safer we are in the UK.”  



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Man sentenced after Facebook helps solve 1996 cold case

Man sentenced after Facebook helps solve 1996 cold caseDALLAS (AP) — The brother-in-law of a Dallas woman raped and slain more than two decades ago while her infant daughter slept in a playpen nearby has pleaded guilty, bringing an end to a case that was re-opened when that daughter as an adult went to police to push for an investigation.



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Russia to hold biggest military drills since Cold War

Russia to hold biggest military drills since Cold WarRussia will flex its military muscles and hold the biggest war games since the Cold War era next month, including almost 300,000 troops and 1,000 aircraft, the defence ministry said Tuesday, leading NATO to warn of a “more assertive Russia”. Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu said the exercises would be similar in size to those held in September 1981 by the Soviet authorities, called Zapad-81, or West 81. “This will be something of a repeat of Zapad-81, but in some senses even bigger,” Shoigu said in comments reported by Russian news agencies.



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How a discarded restaurant napkin led to an arrest in the 32-year-old cold case of a murdered US schoolgirl

How a discarded restaurant napkin led to an arrest in the 32-year-old cold case of a murdered US schoolgirlFor over three decades the disappearance and vicious murder of Michella Welch had left police at a loss. The 12-year-old had disappeared in March 1986 from a park in the city of Tacoma, in Washington State. At the time, she had been babysitting her two younger sisters in Puget Park and had rode off on her bike to pick up some sandwiches. When she returned her sisters were in a nearby business using the lavatory, and Michella is believed to have gone looking for them. When Michella’s sisters returned they found her bike and the sandwiches by a table in the park, but their sister was gone. A police dog discovered her body later that evening down a ravine. She had been raped and murdered. At the time DNA was taken from the scene and placed into evidence, yet the investigation struggled and was eventually filed as an unresolved cold case. However advances in DNA technology over the following decades prompted detectives to take another look at the case. In 2006 police scientists managed to reconstruct a DNA imprint from items collected at the crime scene, although no link was found to any known offender in the United States. Twelve years later progress came due to the growth of genetic genealogy, with its vast databases and archives, including from people researching their family history using DNA testing kits from companies like 23andMe and Ancestry.com. "Genetic genealogy uses DNA technology to identify subjects by matching the unknown profile to a family member," Tacoma Police Chief Don Ramsdell told reporters. "Traditional genealogy is then used to build a family tree from publicly available websites," he said. The technology led police to two brothers, whose age and place of residence in 1986 eventually made them suspects. They were placed under surveillance as police waited for a chance to verify their genetic profiles. Earlier this month one of them, Gary Hartman, ate breakfast at a restaurant with a co-worker, oblivious to the undercover investigator sitting at a neighboring table. Gary Charles Hartman appearing in court charged with the rape and murder of Michella Welch  When Hartman left the investigator collected the napkin he used to wipe his mouth and sent it to a lab for analysis. The tests discovered that the DNA matched that found on Michella Welch's body. Police arrested Hartman without incident at a set of traffic lights and on Friday prosecutors charged the 66-year-old with first-degree murder and first-degree rape. He is currently being held in custody in lieu of $ 5 million (£3.7 million) bail and is due to appear back in court on Monday. "This case does truly represent the crossroads of good old-fashioned police work combined with improvements in technology," Ramsdell said. Pierce County prosecutor Mark Lindquist had a warning to criminals. "Today we are at a point where, if you are a criminal and you left your DNA at the scene, you might as well turn yourself in now. We will catch you," he said.



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