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Police officer stabbed in the neck in latest Hong Kong clashes

Police officer stabbed in the neck in latest Hong Kong clashesA Hong Kong police officer was stabbed in the neck on Sunday in one of the worst acts of violence against the authorities during the 19th straight weekend of civil unrest in the global financial hub. Graphic footage emerged of the policeman being stabbed in the neck from behind with a sharp object as his team retreated towards Kwun Tong metro station.  The police confirmed that two people had been arrested at the scene and the officer had been transferred to hospital “in a conscious state” and was stable.  A police source said that the officer had sustained a 3cm cut to his neck, and while it was still hard to confirm the extent of his injuries, that the attack was “one of the worst” when seen “in terms of malice, in terms of an attempt to kill the officer.”  Flash mob-style protests had initially peacefully in multiple locations with small groups of a few hundred people chanting “Free Hong Kong” slogans but soon developed into chaotic clashes with the riot police as more radical black-clad activists trashed shops and erected barricades on busy roads.     Anti-government protesters in Tai Po, Hong Kong Credit: Ammar Awad/Reuters Dozens were reportedly injured, numerous arrests were made and tear gas was deployed to disperse protesters, although the police said “minimum force” was used. As night fell, about 20 Molotov cocktails were thrown at a police station in Mongkok in Kowloon.  Earlier in the day, protesters played a game of cat-and-mouse with riot officers in Mongkok’s busy shopping district – blocking roads with metal railings and bamboo sticks, only to disappear into a warren of side streets when police vans arrived to clear the way. The Telegraph witnessed at least two rough arrests and an injured officer on the ground on the main thoroughfare of Nathan Road. One bystander claimed that a young man had been detained simply for being alone in the wrong place at the wrong time.  Crowds of residents surrounded the police, hurling insults and accusing them of being “mafia,” jeering as the vans pulled away and giving officers the finger. Video footage of an officer being floored by a protester’s flying kick during another attempted arrest in the area went viral. Elsewhere, the ongoing anti-government protests, which began in opposition to a controversial extradition bill but have now widened into an appeal for universal suffrage and greater democracy, played out more peacefully.  Alan Fung, 62, is taking part in a 48-hour sit-in outside the main police station on Hong Kong island Credit: Michael Zhang On Saturday night, pro-democracy demonstrators performed the exhausting feat of hauling a four-metre statue called “Lady Liberty” to the top of the Lion Rock, a 495-metre peak overlooking Kowloon’s skyscrapers. The statue, which has become one of the many symbols of the movement, was left watching over the city wearing a gas mask, protective goggles and a helmet, proclaiming the slogan "Liberate Hong Kong, revolution of our times". Meanwhile, as younger protesters tried to taunt and out-run the police, the older generation were staging their own rebellion.  About 100 “silver hair” protesters gathered for a 48-hour sit-in outside the main police headquarters in Wan Chai on Hong Kong island this weekend, chanting anti-government slogans and making protest banners. A masked old man took out a black marker pen and wrote insults against the police on the barriers surrounding the station before running away giggling.  About 100 older Hong Kong citizens are staging a "silver hair" rally this weekend Credit: Michael Zhang The group’s presence was a sign of the city’s continuing widespread anger over the government’s handling of the worst political crisis in decades. Although the summer’s mass rallies have largely been led by the young, support for their pro-democracy demands crosses generations.   “We want to say we are the silver haired coming together. We are old but we want to support the younger people. We can’t go to the frontlines but we are in the back to support them,” said Mr Yip, 73, who had come with his 70-year-old wife and two small picnic stools. “I support democracy, I hate the government now.”  Alan Fung, 62, was one of about a dozen pensioners who had braved the humidity as they huddled through the night under a bridge next to the station.  He admitted that he had not got much sleep but said he wanted to camp outside to “protect the young people” and prevent more clashes in the area with the police. “We don’t want it to be dangerous for them again,” he said.  “If we are noisy the government will see that it’s not just the young people who support the campaign but we are too.”



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UPDATE 2-Hong Kong protesters, police in chaotic clashes, as metro, shops targeted

UPDATE 2-Hong Kong protesters, police in chaotic clashes, as metro, shops targeted* ‘Hong Kong has become a police state. Several rallies in shopping mall started peacefully around midday with a few hundred people at each chanting slogans such as “Free Hong Kong”, but by late afternoon hardcore black-clad activists trashed shops and metro stations and erected road blocks around the city.



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Protests, clashes as bid to block Hong Kong mask ban fails

Protests, clashes as bid to block Hong Kong mask ban failsFuriously yelling “Wearing a mask is not a crime,” tens of thousands of masked protesters hit Hong Kong’s rain-drenched streets Sunday in defiance of a new ban on facial coverings. Riot police later swept in with volleys of tear gas and muscular arrests as peaceful rallies again degenerated into widespread violence and chaos in the semi-autonomous Chinese territory. Instead of deterring rioting and calming anti-government demonstrations that have gripped the international trading hub for four months, the ban that criminalized the wearing of face masks at rallies only redoubled the determination of both peaceful marchers and more radical black-clad youths.



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Chinese military issues warning to protesters amid clashes as tens of thousands defy face mask ban

Chinese military issues warning to protesters amid clashes as tens of thousands defy face mask banHong Kong on Sunday saw another night of chaos and violence and an unprecedented warning from the Chinese military, as masked protesters risked tear gas and arrest to march in defiance of an emergency ban on face coverings. As the initially peaceful mass protest on Hong Kong island and in Kowloon spiralled into violent clashes with riot police, the Chinese People’s Liberation Army warned protesters they could be arrested for targeting its barracks with laser lights. The warning, the first of its kind during four months of escalating unrest in the global financial hub, was displayed on a yellow flag as hundreds of demonstrators shone laser pens at troops in fatigues. The soldiers responded with spotlights as they filmed the scene. The nearby Kowloon Tong metro station was trashed, its windows smashed into tiny pieces. The entire mass transit rail system, which has been targeted by protesters who believe it has colluded with the government and police against them, was suspended on Sunday evening. Wildcat protests sprang up and disappeared quickly around the city as bands of protesters played a game of cat and mouse with the riot police. The most radical among them threw Molotov cocktails at advancing officers, who responded with tear gas and arrests. A journalist was struck on the head, briefly setting his helmet on fire. An emergency law has criminalised protesters wearing face masks Credit: Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images In one isolated moment of brutality, a taxi driver was badly beaten by protesters after he drove into them. It is not clear what sparked the incident. The day had started out peacefully as tens of thousands of protesters – including families with children and elderly people - attended two large unsanctioned rallies. It was a sign of the widespread public anger at a move by Carrie Lam, the city's chief executive, to use a sweeping Emergency Regulations Ordinance to enforce a face mask ban that many believe impairs their freedoms. “We are suppressed by the strong government. They suppress us through a law to threaten the people to stay at home. That’s why we have to come out to voice our opinions,” said a woman called Mrs Mak, as she sheltered under her husband’s umbrella. “I have to come out to fight for the youngsters, because I am nearly 60. I come out because I have to support them. The future belongs to them. I want the government to hear what people are saying,” she said. The crowd was visibly nervous, at times stopping and running backwards, after months of angry confrontations between police and protesters that have resulted in over 2,000 arrests, two live shootings and the firing over more than 4,000 tear gas canisters. Some protesters lit fires to block traffic in the city centre Credit: Vincent Thian/AP By mid-afternoon the police had launched tear gas at protesters erecting barricades along major routes, before pushing demonstrators back and making multiple arrests in the shopping district of Causeway Bay. Ms Lam had justified the ban as necessary to end the turmoil that began with a controversial mainland extradition bill but has since spiralled into a wider call for democratic rights. However, many in Hong Kong believe the move has only fuelled mounting public anger. On Sunday morning a group of pro-democracy lawmakers failed in a high court bid to seek an emergency injunction against the ban, arguing that emergency powers bypassed the legislature and contravened the city’s mini-constitution. Sharron Fast, a Hong Kong-based lawyer warned that the use of the emergency regulation had given the chief executive an “unlimited amount of power, in which she alone can enact laws”. She added that Ms Lam could use it to enact more draconian measures including censorship laws. Protesters who marched in torrential rain voiced their anger that the mask ban would not also be applied to the police. Demonstrators have included an independent investigation into police brutality as one of their key demands. Ms Fast said that granting that demand could help to calm the situation. “I think it is still not too little too late. It would take some time, but it would have a pacifying effect.”



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Fourteen-year-old shot in clashes between Hong Kong protesters and police in wake of face mask ban

Fourteen-year-old shot in clashes between Hong Kong protesters and police in wake of face mask banA 14-year-old boy was shot as clashes broke out between protesters and police in Hong Kong on Friday in the wake of a blanket ban on face masks.  Demonstrators stormed the city’s shopping district and set fire to Chinese banks.  Police said a 14-year-old boy was shot in the thigh, but said it was unclear if he was hit by a stray bullet or shot by a police officer who fired his gun after being attacked by a group of protesters. The Hospital Authority said a 14-year-old boy was taken to hospital and was last night in serious condition. The incident would mark the second time live rounds have been fired against protesters since the demonstrations began. The face-mask ban invokes colonial-era emergency powers for the first time since the UK handed the city back to China in 1997. Police fired tear gas and all metro services to Hong Kong Island were halted as some stations also came under attack from protesters. The new face mask law will ban demonstrators from covering their faces in full or partially to prevent their identification during protests, marches or illegal assemblies, with violators facing up to one year of imprisonment or a maximum fine of $ 3,190. Authorities sent in rows of riot police to quell the protests Credit: NICOLAS ASFOURI/AFP At a press conference flanked by her most senior ministers, Carrie Lam, the embattled Chief Executive, said the government enacted the unpopular measure out of duty to “end violence and restore order” to the city, which was now in a “very critical state of public danger” after four months of anti-government protests. The decision to invoke the colonial-era Emergency Regulations Ordinance to push through the face mask ban was “difficult but necessary for the public interest” after scenes of chaos and panic, she argued. As protesters gathered following the announcement, China voiced support for "extremely necessary" ban. The new law is aimed primarily at students, the most active participants in the city’s protests, which began in June against a contentious bill that would have allowed extradition to mainland China, but has since snowballed into a demand for greater rights, including universal suffrage. Schools across the financial hub have already been issued with details of the “Anti-mask act.” The ban was introduced after the worst street violence in decades this week when an 18-year-old demonstrator was shot and critically wounded during a clash with the police. However, the dramatic step by Carrie Lam’s government threatens to inflame tensions further. Hong Kong chief executive confirmed the ban on Friday Credit: PHILIP FONG/AFP Opponents of the measure fear that the use of the Emergency Regulations Ordinance – a colonial-era law first used by the British government to quell a seamen’s strike in Hong Kong harbour in 1922 – could open the door to sweeping controls. They fear that the government could use the ordinance as a form of martial law that would permit authorities to implement any new regulation the government believes would help end “an occasion of emergency or public danger.” Examples could include greater powers to arrest citizens, censor publications, shut off communications networks and search premises without warrants.



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Fresh clashes in Indonesia as protesters adopt 'Hong Kong-style' tactics in fight for rights

Fresh clashes in Indonesia as protesters adopt 'Hong Kong-style' tactics in fight for rightsIndonesian police fired tear gas in central Jakarta on Monday after a new round of protests against controversial legal reforms descended into running street battles.  Several thousand students and activists had gathered near the parliament to rally against a new law which they say will undermine anti-corruption efforts, and a draconian draft penal code that would outlaw sex outside of marriage as well as severely curbing civil liberties and freedom of speech.  Some 20,000 police and military personnel were deployed to the capital to maintain security but chaos ensued when cars were trapped and a subway was closed as officers used tear gas to disperse the crowds. Last week saw some of the biggest rallies since 1998 when student protests fuelled unrest that led to the fall of former President Suharto, and Indonesian students have increasingly begun to adopt the tactics of Hong Kong’s pro-democracy demonstrators in their cry for greater rights.  Do not give up. Hongkongers will stand with you. Fight for justice and freedom together. Be safe and careful. t.co/AM3f2QqnhV— Freehk���� (@Carmen_wu_elf) September 28, 2019 Ahead of major nationwide protests, a video of “Tips from Hong Kong” translated into Bahasa, and which explains how to deal with tear gas and riot police, went viral, reported Reuters. Other posts shared translated advice on what equipment to bring to protests.  Indonesia also appears to have embraced Hong Kong’s use of social media to help coordinate its leaderless movement.   Hashtags, including ReformasiDikorupsi (reformcorrupted), and LogistikAksi (logisticalaction) have been used, alongside a Twitter account that tracks the protests, @AksiLangsung (direct action), to crowdsource for medical help and supplies, and amplify the movement’s message.   Indonesian journalist Veby Mega Indah is treated by medics after she is struck in the face by a projectile fired by the Hong Kong police Credit: Local Press HK/Reuters Hong Kong protesters, now in their 18th week of demonstrations against Beijing’s rule, have sent messages of support and advice through social media, creating their own StandWithIndonesia hashtag.  “Do not give up. Hongkongers will stand with you. Fight for justice and freedom together,” urged one Hong Kong Twitter account. Another warned: “Plz brace for state propaganda!,” while one advised using English to attract international attention.  As videos of Indonesian riot police deploying tear gas began to flood Twitter, Hong Kongers, now experienced with crowd control measures, condemned the use of force. “The insanity can become infectious..be safe Indonesian friends,” said one supporter, @RaptorBuzz.  Indonesian riot police clash with protesters in Medan, northern Sumatra Credit: Antara Foto/Reuters “With smart phones and social media, information spreads like wildfire — so it’s no surprise the Indonesian students are taking tips from the Hong Kong demonstrators,” said Phil Roberson, deputy Asia director for Human Rights Watch.  “Just as governments share worst practices like what rights abusing laws to pass and how to suppress freedom of expression and peaceful public assembly, now protesters are sharing lessons learned on how to respond to government repression,” he said.  “The question now is whether the Hong Kong or Indonesia authorities will further escalate their conflicts with protesters, or seek compromises by finally paying attention to people’s grievances and demands for official accountability for abuses.” On Sunday, as violent clashes gripped Hong Kong, the two mass movements witnessed a grim crossover when Veby Mega Indah, an Indonesian journalist, was badly injured after being struck in the face by a projectile fired at the media by a Hong Kong police officer.   Dear friends in Indonesia, I'm a Hong Kong citizen. Hongkongers have protests against an unwanted bill in HK in recent 3 months. The situation is very similar to yours, so I'm very worry about the incident in your country…HidupMahasiwaReformasiDikorupsipic.twitter.com/cfsBH8SX9D— Moira ��101 CCP's 70th Anniversary Celebration (@Moira_Ooops) September 27, 2019 The journalist now plans to file a criminal complaint the Commissioner of Police and the officer who fired either a bean bag or rubber bullet at close range.  Indonesia faces its own reckoning with allegations of excessive police force. Last week close to 300 people, mainly students, were injured.  On Monday, Detik.com reported that 37 students were treated in hospital for tear gas inhalation, while @AksiLangsung posted several appeals in real time for oxygen, water and medication.   Joko Widodo, the Indonesian president, has promised an investigation into the deaths last week of two students in Sulawesi – one by blunt-force injuries to the head and another by a live bullet. The police deny that any live rounds were fired.   A Hong Kong protester throws back a tear gas canister at the police Credit: Andolu Agency via Getty Protesters have vowed to continue until their demands are met. Mr Widodo has offered to meet student leaders, but he must tread a careful line between their reformist agenda and hardline, conservative Islamic groups who have previously whipped up crowds that crippled the nation’s capital. As with Hong Kong’s opposition to a now withdrawn extradition bill, the latest Indonesian protests have been anchored in objections to a controversial draft law, but have morphed into a wider push for democratic reform.  Indonesian students have been angered by plans for a draconian new penal code that would heavily infringe on civil liberties, including a ban on extramarital sex but also curbs on political beliefs and an expansion of already harsh blasphemy laws.  A student holds an Indonesian flag at a rally outside the parliament Credit: Getty Images/Oscar Siagian But their list of seven demands – which emulates Hong Kong’s “five demands, not one less” motto – are also aimed at demilitarising the restive Papua region, and tackling the widespread forest fires in Sumatra and Borneo that are causing toxic haze across Southeast Asia.  Students also oppose a new law governing the country’s anti-graft agency, which many believe would undermine its powers.  The similarities in protest movements have raised the question of whether Indonesia is having its own “Hong Kong moment.” “In both cases, the students can see that the political elite has struck deals that reflect given political interests but they don't find their own interests represented,” said Rainer Heufers, Executive Director of the Centre for Indonesian Policy Studies in Jakarta. “In Hong Kong, the students fear a law that exposes them to the autocratic governance system of China. In Indonesia, they fear laws that enforce an outdated, paternalistic morality and that reduce the accountability of the political elite.” es.”



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Hong Kong police break up scattered clashes between rival protesters

Hong Kong police break up scattered clashes between rival protestersBaton-wielding Hong Kong police moved in to break up scuffles on Saturday between pro-China protesters and those denouncing perceived Chinese meddling in the Asian financial hub, the latest in months of sometimes violent clashes. The pro-China demonstrators chanted “Support the police” and “China, add oil” at a shopping mall, adapting a line used by anti-Hong Kong government protesters and loosely meaning: “China, keep your strength up”. “Hong Kong is China,” one woman shouted at passersby who shouted obscenities in return in an angry pushing and pulling standoff, marked more by the shouting than violence.



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India imposes curfews in Kashmir after clashes during religious procession

India imposes curfews in Kashmir after clashes during religious processionIndia on Sunday imposed curfews in several parts of the contested Kashmir region, after clashes between security forces and Shi’ite Muslims taking part in a procession, officials and eyewitnesses said. At least 12 locals and six troops were injured on Saturday evening, officials told Reuters, as the worshippers on the traditional mourning procession of Muharram clashed with troops trying to stop it. Troops used tear gas and pellet guns on the crowd, which insisted on carrying on with the procession, one in a series held at this time of the year, and pelted stones at security forces, an Indian official who declined to named told Reuters.



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Meghan McCain Clashes With ‘View’ Co-Hosts: ‘I’m Not Living Without Guns’

Meghan McCain Clashes With ‘View’ Co-Hosts: ‘I’m Not Living Without Guns’Returning for its 23rd season on Tuesday morning, The View started off right where it left off this summer: With conservative co-host Meghan McCain clashing with her colleagues on a hot-button social issue while grousing about being outnumbered by her liberal cohorts.Discussing this past weekend’s mass shooting in Odessa that left at least seven people dead, the panel noted that the shooter had actually failed a federal background check but was able to purchase a firearm due to the gun-show loophole. This prompted the majority of the table—including former Fox News host Abby Huntsman—to lament the lack of action on behalf of the Republican-led Senate to address gun violence.“If nothing is going to happen after Sandy Hook, I don’t know what it’s going to take,” Huntsman sighed.Moments later, McCain weighed in as the “chick on the panel that spent most of her break shooting.”Stating that there need to be more reporters in mainstream media on the “gun beat” because there are a lot of people on TV “talking about guns that clearly have never shot a gun,” McCain complained about Democratic presidential hopeful Beto O’Rourke’s proposal for a mandatory gun buyback.“I will say this is a ground-level issue for me,” she added. “If you’re going to be a gun-grabber, you don’t get my vote, period. We got to have a different conversation.”Liberal co-host Joy Behar—a regular sparring partner of McCain’s—pointed out that there have been gun restrictions passed by previous Democratic administrations, specifically noting that the Clinton White House passed an assault-weapons ban.“The AR-15 is by far the most popular gun in America, by far,” McCain declared. “I was just in the middle of Wyoming, if you're talking about taking people’s guns from them, there’s going to be a lot of violence.”“But they lived without them for many years during the ban,” Behar retorted.“I’m not living without guns,” McCain exclaimed. “It’s just that simple!”Hostin, meanwhile, asked if she could live without assault weapons, causing McCain to reiterate that the AR-15 was very popular before complaining that she was being “virtue signaled.”Huntsman, however, responded to her close friend, wondering if they could live in an America where you could “walk in a mall and not be nervous that someone is going to pull out a shotgun.”McCain asserted that she felt safe because she could protect herself because “I have guns at my house” before stopping herself short as she felt the audience wasn’t with her.“All right, welcome back,” she sarcastically muttered, sipping from her coffee mug.As the segment came to a close, McCain would pipe up once again about O’Rourke’s gun buyback proposal, insisting that her guns are “not for sale.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.



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After night of clashes, Hong Kong braces for fresh rally

After night of clashes, Hong Kong braces for fresh rallyProtesters gathered at a sports stadium Sunday as Hong Kong braced for more anti-government rallies, a day after clashes returned to the city’s streets following several days of relative calm. Hong Kong has been gripped by three months of street demonstrations that started against a proposed extradition bill to China, but have spun out into a wider pro-democracy movement. The MTR — the city’s metro — is the latest Hong Kong business to be rebuked by the public, after appearing to bend to Chinese state-media attacks accusing the transport system of being an “exclusive” service to ferry protesters to rallies.



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