Tag Archives: Cancer

Charles Krauthammer dead: Columnist and Fox News contributor dies of cancer, aged 68

Charles Krauthammer dead: Columnist and Fox News contributor dies of cancer, aged 68Renowned conservative commentator Charles Krauthammer has died at the age of 68, after a prolonged battle with cancer. The Pulitzer Prize winner and Fox News contributor announced earlier this month that he had only weeks left to live. In an essay for the Washington Post, he explained that he had undergone surgery to remove a cancerous tumour last August, and had been battling the complications ever since.



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Woman Diagnosed With Cancer After Doctor Spots Lump on Her Throat During HGTV Appearance

Woman Diagnosed With Cancer After Doctor Spots Lump on Her Throat During HGTV AppearanceNicole McGuinness is now receiving treatment after the eagle-eyed doctor advised her to see a doctor after finding her on social media.



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White House aide mocks Sen. John McCain’s cancer: ‘He’s dying anyway’

White House aide mocks Sen. John McCain’s cancer: ‘He’s dying anyway’Sources with direct knowledge tell NBC News Kelly Sadler made the comment on Thursday after McCain announced that he was opposing the nomination of Gina Haspel as director of the CIA.



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Meghan McCain Takes A Swipe At White House After Aide Mocks Her Father's Cancer

Meghan McCain Takes A Swipe At White House After Aide Mocks Her Father's CancerMeghan McCain and her co-hosts on "The View" wasted no time Friday morning



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Baldness cure could come from side-effect of cancer drug

Baldness cure could come from side-effect of cancer drugA cure for baldness could be on the horizon after British scientists discovered that an osteoporosis drug stimulates hair growth three times quicker than other drugs. Around four in 10 men suffer male pattern baldness by the age of 45 and two thirds by the age of 60. At the moment only two drugs, minoxidil and finasteride, are available for the treatment of male pattern baldness (androgenetic alopecia) – the classic type of receding hair loss in men. But both have side effects and often produce disappointing results. The only other option open to patients losing their hair is transplantation surgery. To find a new treatment, scientists at Manchester University first studied a cancer drug called CsA, which has the embarrassing side-effect of substantial unwanted hair growth. They discovered the hair growth happens because the drug reduces the activity of a protein called SFRP1, which prevents the growth of hair follicles. Although CsA itself is not suitable as a baldness treatment because of its extreme side-effects, scientists found that a drug previously designed to treat osteoporosis, called WAY-316606, was even better at targeting the hair-suppressing protein. The inside of a human hair bulb Credit: Nathan John Hawkshaw  In tests, follicles donated by more than 40 patients undergoing hair transplant surgery were treated with the drug and and quickly went into the active phase of hair growth, sprouting 2mm of hair within just six days. Lead scientist Dr Nathan Hawkshaw said: “The drug also maintained more hair follicles to stay within the growth phase of the hair cycle compared to control. Not only this, we show that this drug effectively enhances hair shaft keratin production. “Collectively this suggests that WAY-316606 could be an effective therapeutic option for treating human hair growth disorders. “CsA takes at least six days to enhance human hair growth ex vivo whereas we see a significant increase in hair growth after two days with WAY-316606. “The fact this new agent, which had never even been considered in a hair loss context, promotes human hair growth is exciting because of its translational potential: It could one day make a real difference to people who suffer from hair loss.” The research also explains why CsA so often induces undesired hair growth in patients as it removes an inbuilt and potent molecular brake on human hair growth. The research was published in the journal Plos Biology.



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Shannen Doherty To Undergo Surgery a Year After Announcing Breast Cancer Remission

One year after announcing that her breast cancer is in remission, Shannen Doherty is going to have surgery.

The actress, 47, did not share the exact nature of the procedure but told fans on social media Tuesday that per her doctor’s recommendation she autologous blood banking, which means storing your own blood, ahead of the surgery.

“My doctor had me bank some blood for my upcoming surgery,” Doherty wrote on Instagram along with a photo of her and her phlebotomist.

“[Phlebotomis] Mars P was patient with me and didn’t even roll his eyes at my anxiety over the needle size,” she continued. “He was patient, kind and really good. As I sat there banking blood for myself, I asked him about some of the people also donating… especially the ones with TVs.”

Added Doherty: “So two of them come every 2 weeks and donate platelets which takes 2 hours. Another girl comes as often as allowed to donate blood. To say I’m moved by the generosity of people is an understatement.”

Doherty went on to say that “as long as I’m cleared in the future, I will start donating.”

“Thank you to those selfless humans that donate,” wrote Doherty. “Thank you to Mars and all at the clinic in Woodland Hills for your smiles and hard work. Thank you to the @americanredcross #humbledagain.”

RELATED: Shannen Doherty Is ‘Staying Positive’ After a Post-Cancer Tumor Scan Came Back ‘Elevated’

Earlier this month, Doherty said she was “staying positive” after a post-cancer tumor scan came back “elevated” but stressed she remained in remission.

“Test and results. One tumor marker test came back good. Other… elevated,” Doherty said in an Instagram post on April 4. “Just means I get monitored and another test. But even after that call, I’m staying positive and taking stock of my life.”

Continued Doherty: “It certainly helps put things in perspective and reminds you of what you learned thru the cancer journey. And I sometimes, need a refresher. As I’ve said before, cancer changes your life in ways no one could ever imagine.”

Doherty added that the elevated levels on the tumor test “can be from all sorts of things” and that she’s “#stillacancerslayer.”

Doherty announced that she was in remission on April 28, 2017. When she shared that she was in remission, she was realistic about the chance of her cancer coming back.

“As every single one of my fellow cancer family knows, the next five years is crucial,” Doherty said on social media at the time. “Reoccurrences happen all the time. Many of you have shared that very story with me. So with a heart that is certainly lighter, I wait.”

In August, Doherty revealed that she had returned to work to film her new Paramount Network series, Heathers, which is set to premiere this year.

“Was back on set today. It’s been a rough two years. Fighting cancer. As an actor, people bench you. They assume you’re too weak, not able etc. etc. and yet it’s something like work that invigorates and renews strength to conquer the unimaginable beast,” she said at the time.


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Rare eye cancer detected in 18 people from two small communities in North Carolina and Alabama

Rare eye cancer detected in 18 people from two small communities in North Carolina and AlabamaEighteen people have been diagnosed with the same type of rare eye cancer – including three university friends – leading researchers to push for funding to find connections, a cause, and a cure. The melanoma, a type of cancer that develops in melanin – the pigment that gives skin its colour, only occurs in about six out of one million people but at least 18 people have been diagnosed with ocular melanoma recently – curiously all have ties to one or both of the communities in Huntersville, North Carolina or Auburn, Alabama. To add to the mystery, three friends who met at Auburn University: Juleigh Green, Allison Allred and Ashley McCrary are all being treated for the disease.



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Waht is Breast Cancer?

Jump to: Causes | Symptoms | Diagnosis | Types | Stages | Treatment | Prevention

What is breast cancer?

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women, after skin cancer. One in eight women in the United States (roughly 12%) will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. It is also the second leading cause of cancer death in women after lung cancer. Encouragingly, the death rate from breast cancer has declined a bit in recent years, perhaps due to greater awareness and screening for this type of cancer, as well as better treatments.

Breast cancer is a disease that occurs when cells in breast tissue change (or mutate) and keep reproducing. These abnormal cells usually cluster together to form a tumor. A tumor is cancerous (or malignant) when these abnormal cells invade other parts of the breast or when they spread (or metastasize) to other areas of the body through the bloodstream or lymphatic system, a network of vessels and nodes in the body that plays a role in fighting infection.

Breast cancer usually starts in the milk-producing glands of the breast (called lobules) or the tube-shaped ducts that carry milk from the lobules to the nipple. Less often, cancer begins in the fatty and fibrous connective tissue of the breast.

New cases of breast cancer are about 100 times more common in women than in men, but yes, men can get breast cancer too. Male breast cancer is rare, but anyone with breast tissue can develop breast cancer.

What causes breast cancer?

Breast cancer is caused by a genetic mutation in the DNA of breast cancer cells. How or why this damage occurs isn’t entirely understood. Some mutations may develop randomly over time, while others are inherited or may be the result of environmental exposures or lifestyle factors.

Most breast cancers are diagnosed in women over age 50, but it’s not clear why some women get breast cancer (including women with no risk factors) and others do not (including those who do have risk factors).

Some breast cancer risks may be preventable. Of course, you cannot control every variable that may influence your risk. Here are the key breast cancer risk factors to know.

  • Age and gender. If you are a woman and you’re getting older, you may be at risk of developing breast cancer. The risk begins to climb after age 40 and is highest for women in their 70s.
  • Family history. Having a close blood relative with breast cancer increases your risk of developing the disease. A woman’s breast cancer risk is almost double if she has a mom, sister, or daughter with breast cancer and about triple if she has two or more first-degree relatives with breast cancer.
  • A breast cancer gene mutation. Up to 10% of all breast cancers are thought to be inherited, and many of these cases are due to defects in one or more genes, especially the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. (Scientists are studying several other gene mutations as well.) In the U.S., BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are more common in Jewish women of Eastern European descent. Having these defective genes doesn’t mean you will get breast cancer, but the risk is greater: A woman’s lifetime risk of breast cancer with a BRCA1 gene mutation, for example, may be more like 55% to 65% compared to the average 12%.
  • Breast changes and conditions. Women with dense breasts or with a personal history of breast lumps, a previous breast cancer, or certain non-cancerous breast conditions are at greater risk of developing breast cancer than women who do not have these conditions.
  • Race/ethnicity. White women are slightly more likely to develop breast cancer than Asian, Hispanic, and African American women. But African American women are more likely to develop more aggressive breast cancer at a younger age and both African American and Hispanic women are more likely to die from breast cancer than white women.
  • Hormones. Women with early menstrual periods (starting before age 12) and late menopause (after age 55) are at greater risk of getting breast cancer. Scientists think their longer exposure to the female hormone estrogen may be a factor, because estrogen stimulates growth of the cells of the breast. Likewise, use of hormone therapy after menopause appears to boost the risk of breast cancer. Oral birth control pills have been linked to a small increase in breast cancer risk compared with women who never used hormonal contraception. But that risk is temporary: More than 10 years after stopping the pill, a woman’s breast cancer risk returns to average.
  • Weight. Women who are overweight or obese after menopause are more likely to get breast cancer. The exact reason why isn’t clear, but it may be due to higher levels of estrogen produced by fat cells after menopause. Being overweight also boosts blood levels of insulin, which may affect breast cancer risk.
  • Alcohol consumption. Studies suggest women who drink two or more alcoholic beverages a day are 1 1/2 times more likely than non-drinkers to develop breast cancer. The risk rises with greater alcohol intake, and alcohol is known to increase the risk of other cancers too. For that reason, the American Cancer Society (ACS) recommends that women stick to one drink a day–or less.
  • Radiation exposure. A woman’s risk of developing breast cancer may be higher than normal if she had chest radiation for another disease as a child or young adult.
  • Pregnancy history. Having no children or having a first child after age 30 may increase your risk of breast cancer.
  • DES exposure. Women who were given the now-banned drug diethylstilbestrol to prevent miscarriage decades ago face a slightly increased risk of breast cancer, as do their daughters.

Scientists are studying a slew of other factors to determine what role, if any, they may play in the development of breast cancer. There’s not enough evidence to say for sure whether smoking, dietary fat, or environmental exposure to certain chemicals, for example, ramp up the risk for breast cancer because study results to date are mixed.

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Breast cancer symptoms

Breast cancer symptoms vary from one person to the next. Knowing what your breasts normally look and feel like may help you recognize possible signs and symptoms.

What does breast cancer feel like? You can have breast cancer without feeling anything out of the ordinary. But, if you find an area of thickening breast tissue, a lump in your breast (usually painless, but not always) or an enlarged underarm lymph node, see your physician.

RELATED: The 15 Worst Things You Can Say to Someone With Breast Cancer

What does breast cancer look like? You may notice a change in the shape or size of your breast. You could have an area of skin that dimples or a nipple that leaks fluid.

Often, there are no early warning signs of breast cancer. Even if you develop a lump, it may be too small to feel. That’s why breast cancer screening, typically using mammography, is so important. Early signs and symptoms of breast cancer that some women and men might experience include:

  • New lump in the breast or armpit, with or without pain. Lumps are often hard but can be soft as well. (Not all lumps are breast cancer. Some lumps may be noncancerous changes or benign, fluid-filled cysts, but they should be checked by your physician.)
  • Change in breast size or shape. Look for swelling, thickening, or shrinkage, especially in one breast.
  • Dimpling, pitting, or redness. Breast skin may take on the appearance of an orange peel.
  • Peeling, flaking, or scaling breast skin.
  • Red, thick, or scaly nipple.
  • Breast, nipple, or armpit pain.
  • Inverted nipple. Look for a nipple that turns inward or flattens.
  • Nipple discharge. It may be clear or bloody.
  • Redness or unusual warmth. This can be a sign of inflammatory breast cancer, a rare and aggressive form of the disease.
  • Swollen lymph nodes under the arm or around the collarbone, which could be a sign that breast cancer has spread.

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Breast cancer screening and diagnosis

With breast cancer, early detection is key. The earlier the disease is diagnosed the less it has progressed, and the better the outcome with treatment.

Screening for breast cancer

A screening mammogram (a type of breast X-ray) can identify the presence of cancer, often before symptoms arise. Women at high risk for breast cancer may also be screened with other imaging tests, like a breast MRI.

Medical organizations and breast cancer advocacy groups urge women to undergo routine screening to find and treat breast cancer early. But experts do not agree on exactly when to begin screening or how frequently women should be tested.

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (an alliance of cancer centers) recommends annual screening beginning at age 40.

The ACS says women ages 40 to 44 should have the option to begin screening every year. It recommends annual screening for women ages 45 to 54. At 55, a woman can decide to continue annual screening or go for her mammogram every other year for as long as she is healthy and has 10 more years of life to live.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force advises women 40 to 49 to talk to their health care provider about when to start screening and how often to be screened. For women 50 to 74, it recommends a mammogram every two years.

Women at high risk of developing breast cancer should be screened earlier and more often. The ACS recommends annual mammograms and breast MRIs starting at age 30 for women with a higher-than-average risk of developing breast cancer, including those with a known breast cancer gene mutation or a first-degree relative with an inherited breast cancer gene mutation.

RELATED: 25 Breast Cancer Myths Busted

Since men have less breast tissue and less breast cancer, they are not routinely screened for the disease. If there is a strong family history of breast cancer or a known breast cancer gene mutation in the family, a man might consider having genetic testing to see if he has a mutation that increases his risk for male breast cancer.

Men who are at high risk for breast cancer should talk to their health care provider about having their breasts examined during routine checkups and doing breast self-exams.

Male or female, it is helpful to know what your breasts normally look and feel like so that you can report any changes to your doctor. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends “breast self-awareness,” meaning knowing what’s normal for your own breasts and paying attention to any changes you may feel.

Regular breast self-exams are no longer recommended as a routine screening method for women because there isn’t sufficient evidence that they offer any early detection or survival benefits.

But should women still have their breasts examined by a doctor every year? Some medical groups see no clear benefit of a clinical breast exam, while others continue to recommend one every year as part of a routine checkup.

Diagnosing breast cancer

An abnormal finding on a screening mammogram or discovering a lump or other breast changes doesn’t necessarily mean you have breast cancer.

First, your doctor will need to perform follow-up testing using one or more types of scans. A diagnostic mammogram, which involves more X-rays than a screening mammogram, can offer a more detailed view of the area of concern. Two other tests, a breast MRI or a breast ultrasound, may be ordered to gather additional diagnostic information.

There is only one way to confirm a cancer diagnosis. You will need a biopsy to extract cells or tissue from the area of the breast that is causing concern. A fine needle may be used to remove cells or tissue, or you may undergo a surgical procedure to remove a piece of breast tissue.

A pathologist will use these specimens to look for cancer under a microscope and may perform additional testing on the tissue sample. The pathology findings can confirm whether or not you have breast cancer and what your chances of beating it–your prognosis–may be. This information can help your medical team (your doctor, your surgeon, your radiologist, and other providers) determine the best course of treatment.

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Types of breast cancer

You and your doctor need to know the type of breast cancer you have to get the best outcome. Your treatment will depend on where your cancer started, whether it has invaded other breast tissue or spread to other parts of your body, and whether hormones like estrogen or progesterone fuel its growth, among other factors.

Most breast cancers are carcinomas, or cancers that start in cells lining the organs or tissues. “In situ” breast cancers haven’t spread to surrounding tissue, which makes them more treatable, while “invasive” breast cancers have invaded surrounding tissue. “Metastatic” breast cancer means it has spread to other parts of your body, such as the lungs, bones, liver, or brain. And “recurrent” breast cancer means breast cancer has returned.

Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)

This highly treatable pre-cancer (sometimes called “stage 0” breast cancer) starts in a milk duct. It’s the most common type of non-invasive breast cancer, meaning the cells are abnormal but haven’t spread to the surrounding tissue. Over time, DCIS may progress to invasive breast cancer.

Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC)

This is the most common breast cancer, accounting for 80% of all invasive breast cancer diagnoses. Also called “infiltrating ductal carcinoma,” IDC starts in a milk duct, breaks through the duct wall, and invades the surrounding breast tissue. It can spread to other parts of the body as well. There are also several subtypes of IDC, which are categorized based on features of the tumors that form.

Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC)

This type of breast cancer begins in the milk-producing glands, called lobules. Also known as “infiltrating lobular carcinoma,” ILC can spread beyond the lobules into surrounding breast tissue and metastasize to other parts of the body. It accounts for about 10% of invasive breast cancers.

Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS)

LCIS, also called lobular neoplasia, starts in the milk-producing lobules. Technically, it’s not breast cancer (even though it has carcinoma in its name), but rather a collection of abnormal cells. People with LCIS are more likely to develop breast cancer in the future.

Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC)

This rare, aggressive type of breast cancer causes redness and swelling of the breast. The affected breast can feel warm, heavy, and tender. The skin may become hard or ridged like an orange rind. See a doctor right away if you have these symptoms. Inflammatory breast cancer tends to strike five years earlier, on average, than other types of breast cancer, and it might not show up on a mammogram. African American women are at greater risk for IBC than white women.

Paget disease of the breast (or the nipple)

This rare cancer affects the skin of the nipple and the darker circle of skin, called the areola, surrounding it. People with Paget disease may notice the nipple and areola becoming scaly, red, or itchy. They may also notice yellow or bloody discharge coming from the nipple. Most people who have this condition also have one or more tumors (either DCIS or invasive cancer) in the same breast.

Metaplastic breast cancer

This rare, invasive breast cancer begins in a milk duct and forms large tumors. It may contain a mix of cells that look different than typical breast cancers and can be more difficult to diagnose.

Angiosarcoma of the breast

This quickly growing cancer is rare. It is usually a complication of a prior radiation treatment of the breast.

Breast cancer subtypes

Breast cancers can also be classified by their genetic makeup. Knowing your cancer’s hormone receptor and HER2 status can help guide treatment.

Hormone receptor positive breast cancer

Some breast cancers are fueled by the hormones estrogen and/or progesterone. Some are not. Knowing whether your cancer is sensitive to these hormones is a crucial piece of the treatment equation. Hormone receptor-positive breast cancer cells have proteins called hormone receptors that attach to estrogen and/or progesterone circulating in your body. Hormonal therapies may be used to fight hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. All invasive breast cancers and DCIS should be tested for hormone status, according to the ACS.

HER2-positive breast cancer

Some breast cancers have higher levels of a protein that promotes cancer growth called human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). Using certain medicines that target HER2 can help kill the cancer.

Triple negative breast cancer

Triple negative breast cancer is estrogen receptor-negative, progesterone receptor-negative, and HER2-negative. Using hormone therapies or HER2 drugs will not slow these aggressive cancers. Triple negative breast cancer is more common among Hispanic and African American women, as well as younger women.

Triple positive breast cancer

Cancers that are positive for estrogen receptors, progesterone receptors, and HER2 can be treated with hormone therapies and drugs that target HER2.

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Breast cancer stages

All breast cancers are assigned a stage based on biopsy results plus other findings from blood tests and imaging scans. Staging can help you and your medical team make decisions about appropriate treatment and understand your chances of survival.

RELATED: 22 Ways to Help a Friend With Breast Cancer

Breast cancer stages reflect the size of the tumor, whether it is invasive, whether it has reached the lymph nodes (glands that are part of the body’s immune system), and whether it has spread to other parts of the body.

Stage 4 breast cancer

At Stage 4, breast cancer has traveled to distant sites in the body, often the bones, liver, brain, or lungs. This is called metastatic breast cancer. Although this stage is considered incurable, new treatments allow patients to live longer with their disease.

Stage 3 breast cancer

Stage 3 breast cancer is an advanced cancer. It’s in the lymph nodes but has not spread to other organs. This stage is divided into three categories, 3A, 3B and 3C, based on the size of the tumor and how many and which lymph nodes are involved.

Stage 2 breast cancer

At Stage 2, breast cancer is growing but is only in the breast or nearby lymph nodes. This stage has two categories, 2A and 2B, based on how large the tumor is and whether or not it has spread to nearby lymph nodes.

Stage 1 breast cancer

Stage 1 is an invasive cancer, meaning it is invading healthy breast tissue, but it has not spread outside the breast. This stage also has two categories, 1A and 1B, based on whether there is any evidence of small clusters of breast cancer cells in nearby lymph nodes.

Stage 0 breast cancer

Also called pre-cancer, this is the earliest stage of breast cancer. It involves abnormal cells that have not spread into breast tissue from the ducts or lobules where they began. Stage 0 breast cancer also has not spread to lymph nodes or other parts of the body. Stage 0 breast cancer is non-invasive, like ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS).

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Breast cancer treatment

Breast cancer treatment regimens differ widely based on the type of cancer, its stage, its sensitivity to hormones, the patient’s age and health, and other factors. Treatments for men and women are similar.

Surgery and radiation therapy are mainstays of breast cancer treatment. These are known as “local therapies” because they target the tumor without affecting the rest of the body.

With a breast-conserving surgery called a lumpectomy, only the portion of the breast containing cancer is removed. A mastectomy involves removing the entire breast and possibly some of the surrounding tissue. Lymph nodes may be removed as part of breast cancer surgery or a separate operation.

RELATED: Why Are So Many Women Getting Double Mastectomies They Might Not Need?

Radiation therapy uses high-energy waves to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. It may be recommended for patients who have breast cancer surgery or whose cancer has spread to other parts of the body.

Cancer-killing chemotherapy medicines are delivered intravenously (into a vein) or taken by mouth. Chemo may be given before or after surgery. It’s also used in treating advanced cancer cases. Because these medicines travel through the bloodstream, they can have significant side effects, including mouth sores, hair loss, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

Some breast cancers are sensitive to hormones produced in the body. In these hormone receptor-positive breast cancers, estrogen and/or progesterone fuels cancer growth. Hormone therapy can lower the body’s estrogen levels or stop hormones from binding to cancer cells. This category of breast cancer treatment includes the oral medicine tamoxifen, which is often given after surgery to women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer.

Newer medicines, called targeted therapies, specifically attack cancer cells while sparing normal cells, meaning patients experience fewer side effects. Trastuzumab (Herceptin), for example, is a drug that starves HER2-positive breast cancers by blocking the HER2 protein.

Treatment outcomes may depend on the stage of cancer, a patient’s response to treatment, and other factors.

Generally speaking, stage 0 and 1 breast cancers are highly treatable. The five-year survival rate for women diagnosed with breast cancer in these early stages is close to 100%. At stages 2 and 3, some 93% and 72% of women, respectively, can expect to live at least five years after being diagnosed with breast cancer. Stage 4 or metastatic breast cancer is difficult to treat. The five-year survival rate is about 22%.

For men with breast cancer, the five-year survival rates are similar: 100% for stages 0 and 1, 91% for stage 2, 72% for stage 3, and 20% for stage 4.

Remember, breast cancer statistics are just averages. They don’t reflect an individual patient’s experience.

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Breast cancer prevention

While no one can tell you how to prevent breast cancer with any sort of guarantee, there’s evidence to suggest that certain healthy lifestyle changes can lower your breast cancer risk.

  • Limit your alcohol intake. The more you drink, the higher your risk of breast cancer.
  • Watch your weight. Being overweight or obese boosts your breast cancer risk.
  • Exercise. Women who work out regularly have a lower risk of breast cancer than less active women.
  • Consider breastfeeding your baby. Women who breastfeed have a lower risk of breast cancer than moms who do not breastfeed their children.
  • Reduce your hormone intake. Hormone therapy users are at higher risk for breast cancer. If you’re taking hormones to relieve menopausal symptoms, talk to your doctor about taking the lowest dose that works for you for the shortest time.

RELATED: Celebrities Who Battled Breast Cancer

Patient advocates hope that greater breast cancer awareness will lead to earlier detection and better outcomes. You, too, can join the fight against breast cancer. October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, a great time to join a breast cancer walk near you.

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Breast Cancer – Health.com

Dog feared to have cancer had actually eaten four teddy bears… but vet didn't realise until midway through operation 

Dog feared to have cancer had actually eaten four teddy bears... but vet didn't realise until midway through operation A dog feared to cancer had actually eaten four teddy bears, but the vet did not realise until halfway through the operation. Eight-year-old St Bernard Maisy was taken for a CT scan after she was taken ill, which showed a mass on her spleen and an unusually full stomach, seemingly showing she had not digested her food properly. Her owner, Jane Dickinson, from Dewsbury in West Yorkshire, feared the worst as she took her pet to Paragon Veterinary Referrals in Wakefield. It would not be unusual for Maisy, an elderly dog, to have cancer at her advanced age. However, vet surgeon Nick Blackburn ruled out any fatal disease when he carried out the operation to remove Maisy’s spleen and found her stomach was full of soft toys. Maisy is now reportedly 'loving life' Credit:  Paragon Vet Referrals / SWNS.com He said : "It's fair to say this was not something we were expecting to find! We all know certain dogs enjoy chewing things they shouldn't but managing to devour four full teddy bears is quite a feat. "I know Jane was worried about Maisy as she is quite old for a St Bernard, so we were naturally delighted the operation was such a success and we were able to return a happy, healthy dog to the Dickinsons.” Her owner said she had never seen the gentle giant chewing or eating toys, but that now the operation has been completed Maisy is “loving life”. An x-ray showing the teddy bears within the stomach. Credit: Paragon Vet Referrals / SWNS.com Ms Dickinson explained: "When Maisy went in I did think 'is she coming out?' but she is loving life now – it's like she's got her youth back. "The toys weren't even hers! She will steal the chihuahuas' toys and play with them but I've never seen her trying to chew them. Her eating habits had been completely normal. "I didn't even recognise one of the toys – my brother also keeps chihuahuas and it turns out it belonged to his dog." Maisy has since made a full recovery from her operation and a histology report has shown no signs of cancer.



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Bride with Stage 4 Cancer Lives to See Wedding Day After Doctors Urged Her to Move Up Ceremony

In September, doctors urged 29-year-old Laurin Bank to move up her wedding date, fearing that the cancer patient wouldn’t live to see March 24. She said “no.”

“This date was special to us,” Bank says of herself and her now-husband Michael. “We felt like moving that date was giving up and giving in to the cancer and letting it run our lives. We didn’t want to give in. That was our goal … and I was able to walk down the aisle to my husband. I was able to dance with him and I didn’t need a wheelchair or oxygen. I did it I made it.”

Bank, of Columbia, South Carolina, was diagnosed with stage two breast cancer in September 2014. She underwent chemotherapy, radiation and a double mastectomy before being declared cancer-free in April 2015.

“When I learned I was cancer free I felt ecstatic,” she tells PEOPLE. “I felt free and that I had gotten my life back. And I was more ready than ever to live my life.”

Michael (left) and Laurin Bank

However, her health took a turn in August 2017 when doctors told Bank her cancer had returned as stage four, and had metastatized to her bones, liver and lungs.

“It’s not news I wanted to hear,” she tells PEOPLE. “I looked at my oncologist and said, ‘quality over quantity. That’s my goal. And if there’s treatment, I want to do it.’ I was ready to fight. I fought once and I knew I could fight again. Being stage four is scary but I’m young, so I have a lot of fight in me.”

Bank began treatment as part of a clinical trial and her health began to improve. But, in September, doctors gave her a fierce warning.

“The oncologist said waiting six more months to get married would be risky. She said she wasn’t sure whether I’d need a wheelchair to get me down the aisle. She said it would be best for us to move up our wedding date. The doctor also said with my lungs not being so strong, I might need oxygen for my wedding day.”

Michael (left) and Laurin Bank

However, she says she and Michael picked March 24 because it’s the anniversary of their first date three years ago.

“Mike looked at me and said, ‘Don’t you dare worry. It’s going to be okay,’ ” says Bank, who chronicles her health journey on her personal blog, The Polka Dot Queen. “We didn’t want to give in to the cancer. We wanted to have [our wedding] on our terms.”

And they did. On March 24, a smiling Bank walked down the aisle, wed Michael and danced energetically in front of 230 of her closest family and friends.

Laurin (left) and Michael Bank

Laurin (left) and Michael Bank

“I danced until the last song of the night,” she says. “The wedding day was the best day ever. I was so shocked that I made it! I felt good and I felt strong. It was an emotional morning. As I walked down the aisle to him, I was just bursting with joy and happiness because I was so excited to marry him.”

Now, Bank says her health is improving and she’s continuing her treatment. She says she and Michael are looking forward to their trip to Italy in September, as they haven’t been able to fly overseas for their honeymoon as a result of Bank’s illness.

“Our goal is to go on our dream honeymoon like we originally planned,” she says. “Until then we’re planning a bunch of mini trips to celebrate and enjoy.”

Michael adds: “I made the decision that I want to be there for her and support her 100 percent. I’m going to support her through this fight.”


www.health.com/syndication/laurin-bank-cancer-wedding-move-ceremony “>
Breast Cancer – Health.com