Tag Archives: British

British cyclist shot dead by hunter in French Alps

British cyclist shot dead by hunter in French AlpsA British mountain biker has been shot dead in the French Alps after he was mistaken for an animal by a local hunter. Marc Sutton, 34, originally from south Wales, died on Saturday evening after being struck by a single bullet while cycling in thick woods near the ski resort of Les Gets. The 22-year-old gunman, who has a firearms licence, was with a group of around 20 other hunters when the tragedy occurred. He had to be admitted to hospital after suffering from deep shock following the incident. Mr Sutton, a chef, had lived in the Alps for a number of years and owned and ran a restaurant with his girlfriend near the village of Morzine. Marc Sutton was a keen and experienced mountain biker  Credit: Facebook Amie Henderson, 38, a friend and neighbour of the of the couple told the Telegraph: “This is a very tight-knit expat community and we are all deeply shocked. There is anger too because every year there are hunting accidents.” Ms Henderson, who runs a local magazine for holidaymakers called Morzine Source, added: “Marc had a lot of friends in the area. We’ll all miss him.” Another local wrote on Facebook:  "This is absolutely devastating. Everyone in our community will be affected by last night’s accident. So very sad for Marc and everyone with him." Les Gets – locator map A source involved with the police investigation said: "He died instantly after being hit with a single bullet. The accident happened on Saturday evening in thick woods. The shooter went into deep shock when he realised what he had done." The source added: "He was riding a mountain bike on a popular and well used track, but it was difficult to get to and would not have been busy as darkness approached. The hunter may have mistaken him for an animal.” Marc Sutton with his partner Jo Watts Credit: Facebook But local prosecutor for the Thonon-Les-Bains region said: "Couldn't be confused with game, as he had a coloured helmet and a coloured mountain bike", suggesting the weapon might have gone off accidentally. It is understood local police are treating the matter as aggravated manslaughter for which the gunman could be prosecuted and jailed. “He was riding a mountain bike on a popular and well used track, but it was difficult to get to and would not have been busy as darkness approached. The hunter may have mistaken him for an animal.” Marc Sutton was shot dead on Saturday evening The Foreign Office said it was in contact with the local authorities and was ready to provide assistance to the man's family. It is the latest in a series of hunting accidents in which people have been killed or severely wounded. Last year a 59-year-old hiker was shot dead by a hunter in the Drôme and a 13-year-old boy died when he was accidentally shot by his grandfather. In 2017 a woman who had been sitting in her garden was killed after a stray hunter's bullet passeds through her garden hedge. In 2016, there were 18 fatal hunting accidents reported in France.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

First F-35 crash occurs on same day stealth jet lands on British carrier

First F-35 crash occurs on same day stealth jet lands on British carrierThe US military has announced an F-35B Lightning II stealth jet has crashed, the first such loss to the programme. The US Marine Corps said the plane came down near Beaufort, South Carolina, on Friday. The American pilot safely ejected and was evaluated by medical personnel. There were no civilian casualties. An investigation into the crash was launched although the fleet was not grounded, suggesting the cause was not thought to be a fundamental design or safety flaw. Britain has said it will buy 138 F-35B jets, the same variant as the one that crashed, and has committed money for the first 48. The crash occurred on the same day as the Ministry of Defence announced the first F-35B jets had landed on HMS Queen Elizabeth, marking Britain’s return to carrier strike operations. An MoD spokesman told the Telegraph the UK was not looking to ground its fleet of F-35 aircraft, but that the Aviation Safety Authority would keep that decision under review. An F-35B Lightning II jet on the flight deck of the UK's new aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth after making one of the first ever vertical landings. September 25 2018.   Credit: Lockheed Martin/MoD/Crown copyright/PA The 17-year F-35 programme has been widely criticised for cost and combat effectiveness. Of the three aircraft variants, the ‘B’ model is designed for vertical take-off and landing. The engineering constraints necessary for such manoeuvres reduces the room for weapons and fuel. However, both the US Marine Corps and the British government decided the flexibility afforded by vertical lift, combined with shorter – and therefore cheaper – aircraft carriers, meant the ‘B’ model was the preferred option. On Friday Lockheed Martin, the prime contractor for the F-35 programme, announced a deal with the US government for an additional 141 jets had reduced the unit cost of future purchases across all variants. As a result, the next batch of British F-35B aircraft will be reduced in cost by 5.7 per cent to $ 115.5 million (£88.6 million) per airframe.   Vice Admiral Mat Winter, the F-35 programme executive officer, said: “driving down cost is critical to the success of this program. “We are delivering on our commitment to get the best price for taxpayers and war fighters.”



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Gavin Williamson commits extra British troops in Ukraine to stop Russia 'reversing Cold War outcome'

Gavin Williamson commits extra British troops in Ukraine to stop Russia 'reversing Cold War outcome'Only a month ago, a Ukrainian soldier was killed by sniper fire at the spot where Gavin Williamson, the Defence Secretary, is now standing. This is the front line of the West’s new war with Russia. Two hundred yards away, Russian-backed separatists are in position, their sniper rifles at the ready. Protected by helmet and body armour, Mr Williamson is surveying the remains of a hospital, its walls bullet-riddled and the windows blown out. Separatist fighters had targeted it with mortars  and machine gun fire from across the fields that now represent an illegal de facto border between Ukraine and Russian-occupied territory outside Marinka, a satellite town about three miles to the west of Donetsk.  Mr Williamson had deployed forward from the safety of Kiev, Ukraine’s capital city, to see for himself the effects of what he called Russia’s “brazen and reckless” act of initiating the conflict in the east of the country.  Britain will increase military support to its ally by sending Royal Marines later this year and increase the presence of Royal Navy patrols in the Black Sea in 2019.  Odessa, Ukraine’s biggest port, located in the west of the country, is expected to come under pressure from the Russian Navy over the coming months as they try to effect an economic blockade. Gavin Williamson with troops in the contested region of Ukraine. September 18th 2018. Tension with Russia after Ukraine’s Maidan Revolution in 2014 led to separatists, backed by regular Russian military units, seizing Crimea and a large swathe of Ukrainian territory along the border. More than 10,000 lives have been lost in the conflict. Mr Williamson’s Ukrainian hosts watched nervously as the Secretary of State surveyed the damage, mindful that he stay on the paved surface. The fields either side are now feared to have been planted with landmines hidden beneath the soil.  The Ukrainian soldier killed last month had been shot at from a house on the Russian separatist side of the frontline. Mr Williamson became on Tuesday the first western minister outside of Ukraine to experience the frontline – and Vladimir Putin’s land grab – at such close proximity. He may as well have been sauntering down Whitehall. “The Kremlin is trying to undermine our values, destroy our way of life, and reverse the outcome of the Cold War,” said Mr Williamson, 42. “Its behaviour only increases the risk of miscalculation and the prospect of crisis turning to chaos.”  There needs to be a response to Russian encroachment. We’ve got to make it clear that there is a price to be paid for such actionsDefence Secretary Gavin Williamson The Mi-8 Hip helicopter taking us east towards the 300 mile-long Line of Control, the new, illegal border with Russia, had raced forward at 120 knots, pulling up sharply to get over trees and power lines. Twenty-six Ukrainian aircraft have been shot down by Russian-supplied surface to air missiles since the conflict started, so the pilots take no chances and cling to the safety of the folds in the earth.  Some 35,000 Russian-backed separatists and an estimated 4,000 regular Russian troops are located in the Donetsk and Luhansk regions of eastern Ukraine. Holding them back are around 60,000 Ukrainian forces. The Kremlin tried to break the will of the Ukrainian people, Mr Williamson said, but the nation came together against such a blatant act of aggression. “What you’ve seen is an independent free nation that has been attacked by a powerful neighbour and we’ve seen men and women come together to repel that invasion and push back those that would wish to do them harm,” he told the Telegraph, accompanying him on the visit.   “Vladimir Putin and his cronies around him want to abuse their power. This is not the type of behaviour we expect of any nation, let alone one that sits as a permanent member of the Security Council. [Russia is becoming] a pariah nation.”  The Defence Secretary receives a brief in a hardened bunker from the Ukrainian General in command of the operational area.  Around 300,000 people live without clean water after the treatment plant supplying this region of Ukraine was destroyed by shelling. Just inside Russia an estimated 700 tanks are available to push further into Ukraine should the order come. Cyber attacks are common with Ukrainian military personnel regularly harassed on their personal mobile phones. The message from Russia is clear: we can get to you any time we want.   Russia’s military intelligence arm, the GRU, blamed by Britain for the nerve agent attack in Salisbury, is also present. Two GRU operatives were caught inside Ukraine in 2016 and exchanged for a pilot that had been shot down. They are all constant reminders of how easily Russia and the separatists can raise or lower the pressure, according to the wider agenda of destabilising Ukraine and making it an unattractive prospect for Nato or EU membership.  Gavin Williamson stayed at the front line for about 20 minutes, accompanied by Ukraine’s Joint Force Operation Commander, Lieutenant General Serhiy Nayev. The protection party of around 50 soldiers, scanning the scrub and battered buildings nearby for signs of movement, were eager to move on.  Four years of war in Europe: A photo dispatch from the frontline in Ukraine Despite all the security measures, including having two Mi-24 Hind helicopter gunships cover our approach, the soldiers admitted Russia probably knew the British Defence Secretary was here. To attack the British minister would, of course, be an outrageous and provocative act, but after Salisbury all rules have changed. Mr Williamson was undeterred and happy to stay chatting with Ukrainian troops. “We have common values and we believe in standing up for those common values,” he said, “It’s important that we stand up for the international rules-based order. “There is a constant pattern where Russia is pushing the boundaries of acceptable behaviour [and] there needs to be a response to Russian encroachment. We’ve got to make it clear that there is a price to be paid for such actions.”  Mr Williamson is in no doubt that blame lies directly with Mr Putin. “The behaviour of the Putin-led regime is not acceptable. We want to be able to ensure that the people who are on the front line, where we are today, have the best ability to survive and defend their homeland.” He also fears Mr Putin is widening his new Cold War with the West. Mr Williamson added: “We’re seeing Russian aggression, not just on the front line but an increasingly more assertive posture in the Black Sea. They want to open up new fronts.” Gavin Williamson is shown the last checkpoint on the Ukrainian side of the contested Line of Control. The Russian-backed separatist checkpoint is 300m further down the road.  The Defence Secretary is pledging to stand firm. “We’re going to be upping our training and support efforts with the Royal Navy and Royal Marines, making sure that the Ukrainian Navy and Ukrainian forces have the skills and the technical ability to deal with these increasing threats.” Mr Williamson was criticised in the past for saying Russia should “go away and shut up”. Invited by the Telegraph to repeat his suggestion at full volume towards the trenches just a few hundred yards away, he politely declined.  It was time to get back in the heavily armoured vehicles and head West, to the relative safety of Kiev. Mr Williamson’s full-throated support for his Ukrainian hosts and promise of increased British military personnel had earned much praise. “You are very brave for coming here,” one Ukrainian soldier told him.  “Our commitment remains unwavering,” Gavin Williamson said. “As long as the danger lasts we will continue to stand by your side. The safer you are here, the safer we are in the UK.”  



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

British caver sues Elon Musk over 'pedo' comments

British caver sues Elon Musk over 'pedo' commentsThe defamation suit filed in Los Angeles by Vernon Unsworth, a Briton involves in several cave rescues, follows a highly public spat between the two after Musk traveled to Thailand and offered to assist in rescue efforts. The dispute made headlines in July, when Unsworth called Musk’s effort to build a mini-submarine for the rescue a “PR stunt” and Musk responded on Twitter by calling Unsworth a “pedo guy,” or pedophile.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

7 wounded in Paris knife attack, including British, Egyptian tourists

7 wounded in Paris knife attack, including British, Egyptian touristsA man believed to be an Afghan national was being held in custody Monday as the suspect in an attack with a knife and an iron bar in Paris that left seven people injured, including three foreign tourists, police said. In the attack next to a canal in the northeast of the capital on Sunday evening, the suspect, believed to be in his thirties, was overpowered by bystanders who had tried to stop him by throwing petanque balls at him. Two British tourists and an Egyptian visitor were among the seven injured, four of whom were said to be in critical condition.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

7 wounded in Paris knife attack, including British, Egyptian tourists

7 wounded in Paris knife attack, including British, Egyptian touristsA man believed to be an Afghan national was being held in custody Monday as the suspect in an attack with a knife and an iron bar in Paris that left seven people injured, including three foreign tourists, police said. In the attack next to a canal in the northeast of the capital on Sunday evening, the suspect, believed to be in his thirties, was overpowered by bystanders who had tried to stop him by throwing petanque balls at him. Two British tourists and an Egyptian visitor were among the seven injured, four of whom were said to be in critical condition.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

7 wounded including 2 British tourists in Paris knife attack: sources

7 wounded including 2 British tourists in Paris knife attack: sourcesSeven people including two British tourists were wounded Sunday in Paris after they were attacked by a man armed with a knife and an iron bar, according to police and other sources. A security guard at one of two cinemas on either side of the Canal de l’Ourcq said he saw a man who had already assaulted people being chased by two other men who tried to stop him. “He had an iron bar in his hand which he threw at the men chasing him, then he took out a knife,” he told AFP.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

French and British fishermen clash in scallop war skirmish

French and British fishermen clash in scallop war skirmishThe British were heavily outnumbered at five boats to around 35 French vessels, according to maritime official Ingrid Parot, and were eventually chased from the scallop-rich waters of the Baie de Seine area of Normandy. The skirmish took place more than 12 nautical miles out to sea where the British are legally allowed to fish all year round. Apparently there was stone-throwing, but no injuries,” said Normandy fishing chief Dimitri Rogoff.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

A scallop skirmish erupts between French, British boats

A scallop skirmish erupts between French, British boatsPARIS (AP) — It won't be remembered as one of the great naval encounters between France and England but, unlike at the Battle of Trafalgar, this time French mariners felt they won.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

British Thai cave rescue hero sends legal letter to Elon Musk threatening to sue over paedo accusation

British Thai cave rescue hero sends legal letter to Elon Musk threatening to sue over paedo accusationThe British caving expert who coordinated the rescue of 12 Thai children trapped underground has informed Elon Musk he is preparing to sue him, after the Tesla founder labelled him a “paedo” on Twitter.  Vernon Unsworth, 63, enraged the billionaire when he rejected his offer of sending a submarine to assist the rescue, pointing out that it was not a workable solution, and deriding it as a "PR stunt". He said Mr Musk could "stick his submarine where it hurts." Mr Musk hit back, calling Mr Unsworth a “paedo guy”, in a now-deleted tweet. He then issued an apology, and said he had tweeted “in anger”. Elon Musk, founder of Tesla But on Tuesday he reignited the controversy by mocking Mr Unsworth for not following up on his threat to take legal action. On Wednesday it emerged that Mr Unsworth’s lawyers had in fact sent Mr Musk a letter on August 6, informing him of their intention to sue for the “false and defamatory statements.” “You published through three different tweets to your twenty-two million followers that Mr Unsworth engages in the sexual exploitation of Thai children, and you did so at a time when he was working to save the lives of twelve Thai children,” wrote L. Lin Wood, an Atlanta-based defamation expert, in a letter obtained by BuzzFeed.  “You did so without any basis. According to a subsequent Twitter post, you did so out of anger.” A Tesla representative did not respond to The Telegraph’s request for comment. Mr Unsworth told Sky News on Wednesday: “It's all being dealt with, that's all I can say."



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines