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British aid worker latest victim of Ethiopian Airlines crash as British death toll rises to 'at least nine'

British aid worker latest victim of Ethiopian Airlines crash as British death toll rises to 'at least nine'Ethiopian Airlines said 157 passengers and crew members were killed when one of its jets crashed shortly after take-off from Addis Ababa on Sunday morning. At least nine Britons and one Irish citizen were among the dead, as were scientists, doctors, aid workers and three members of a Slovakian MP's family. The Foreign Office said: "We can now sadly confirm at least nine British nationals were on board flight ET302. "Our staff at the British Embassy in Addis Ababa are continuing to work with the relevant authorities in Ethiopia to obtain further information. "We extend our deepest condolences to all those who have lost loved ones and those affected by this tragic event." Here is what we know so far about the victims: Sam Pegram An aid worker from Penwortham has been identified tonight as one of the 157 people who died when an Ethiopian Airways plane crashed near Addis Ababa yesterday. Geneva-based Mr Pegram, 25 and from Penwortham, was an intern with the Norwegian Refugee Council. Sam Pegram The Lancashire Evening Post quoted Mr Pegram's mother Deborah, who said: "Sam was so looking forward to going to Nairobi. He loved the work he was doing. "We can't believe this has happened. We're totally devastated." Sahra Hassan Said and Nasrudin Abdulkadir The family of Sarah Hassan Said and her son Nasrudin Abdulkadir has confirmed that the pair died on the plane. It is understood they are dual Somali-British nationals. Ms Hassain Said's siblings and nephew wrote tributes to the mother and son on Facebook. Ms Said’s brother wrote: “May Allah have mercy on them.” Another relative, Maxamuud Hassan, said the pair had been travelling from Germany together, writing: “We are feeling so bad right now. We have lost so much.” Joanna Toole Joanna Toole, a 36-year-old from Exmouth, Devon, was heading to Nairobi to attend the UN Environment Assembly when she was killed. Her father, Adrian, described her as a "very soft and loving" woman whose "work was not a job – it was her vocation". "It's just tragic that she couldn't carry on to further her career and achieve more," he told the BBC. "She was very well known in her own line of business and we've had many tributes already paid to her." Joanna Toole He also said she used to keep homing pigeons and pet rats and travelled to the remote Faroe Islands to prevent whaling. Manuel Barange, director of the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations fisheries and aquaculture department, tweeted saying he was "profoundly sad and lost for words" over the death of the "wonderful human being". Michael Ryan Irishman Michael Ryan was among the seven dead from the UN's World Food Programme (WFP), a Rome-based humanitarian organisation distributing billions of rations every year to those in need. The aid worker and engineer known as Mick was formerly from Lahinch in Co Clare in Ireland's west and was believed to be married with two children and living in Cork. His projects have included creating safe ground for Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh and assessing the damage to rural roads in Nepal which were blocked by landslides. Irish premier Leo Varadkar said: "Michael was doing life-changing work in Africa with the World Food Programme." Mr Ryan's mother Christine said that her son "wanted to save the world". He was employed by the UN's World Food Programme (WFP), which is a leading humanitarian organisation delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with impoverished communities to improve nutrition. The married father-of-two, who was originally from Lahinch in Co Clare, had relocated to Rome to work at WFP headquarters. His wife Naoise and children were due to move out to Rome in the coming months. Speaking to RTE Morning Ireland, Christine said: "He's an amazing person, we can't believe it and we can't come to terms with this. "His wife and children are just devastated. "He was a very enthusiastic person, he had a great vision and he believed in engineering and in putting people first." Mrs Ryan said she knew he was flying to Nairobi but didn't know he was on the flight that crashed until his wife contacted her. "Naoise was saying that she was always concerned when he got on different flights but when he got on this particular flight she wasn't particularly concerned as he had been in worse situations and survived and got through it," Christine added. "He was involved in a lot of projects worldwide, flood relief, landslides, Ebola. He had been in Afghanistan and Pakistan and Sudan. "He felt he made a difference. He had a marvellous vision and he just got there and did it and had great enthusiasm. "He always wanted to help others and he loved people and would light up a room. He had a way with people. "He never wanted a nine to five job, he put everything into his work. "He had some amazing stories. There was a lot of danger for him but he loved his work. We all appreciated what he was doing and we couldn't take that away from him." Mrs Ryan said her son was turning 40 at the end of the month and the family were to fly to Rome next week for the celebrations. Sarah Auffret Polar tourism expert Sarah Auffret was making her way to Nairobi to discuss tackling plastic pollution in the seas at the UN assembly, according to her Norway-based employers Association of Arctic Expedition Cruise Operators (AECO). The University of Plymouth graduate held dual French-British citizenship, Norwegian media reported. Sarah Auffret Credit: PA/AECO Raised in Brittany, the environmental agent was leading AECO's efforts to cut back single-use plastics on Arctic expeditions and co-ordinating beach clean-ups. Tributes were paid by the University of Plymouth to Sarah Auffret, who graduated in 2007 after studying European Studies and German. "The university was deeply saddened to learn of the tragic death of Sarah Auffret over the weekend and sends its deepest condolences to her family and friends," a spokesman said. "Sarah was an exemplary student who fully embraced university life and took every opportunity to develop herself while she was here. "She is remembered as someone who had a passion for learning about Europe and a strong moral compass. "In her role at the Association of Arctic Expedition Cruise Operators, Sarah had also met several of the university's leading scientists at the Arctic Frontiers conference in Tromso this year. "They, like many others in the audience, had been deeply impressed with her presentation on plastic pollution and her evident passion for the planet." Joseph Waithaka Joseph Waithaka, a 55-year-old who lived in Hull for a decade before moving back to his native Kenya, also died in the crash, his son told the Hull Daily Mail. Ben Kuria, who lives in London, said his father had worked for the Probation Service, adding: "He helped so many people in Hull who had found themselves on the wrong side of the law." Joseph Waithaka Credit: Twitter It is understood Mr Waithaka had a dual-nationality passport. His son paid tribute to his father Joseph Waithaka, calling him "one of the humblest people that I know". Mr Kuria, from south London, said: "He's someone who really loved justice, and didn't give up on people most people had given up on. "He really just wanted the best for his kids. He was a father not just to us but to so many people in so many ways." The foreign nationals who died in the crash Senior Captain Yared Getachew, who was a dual Ethiopian-Kenyan national, was the pilot on the flight. Colleagues said he had piloted over 8,000 hours and had an "excellent flying record". Anton Hrnko, an MP for the nationalist Slovak National Party, said he was "in deep grief" to announce that his wife Blanka, daughter Michala and son Martin were among the dead. Hospitality company Tamarind Group announced "with immense shock and grief" that its chief executive Jonathan Seex was among the fatalities. German national Anne-Katrin Feigl was named as a crash victim by the International Organisation for Migration (IOM). She was en route to a training course in Nairobi as part of her role as a junior professional officer at the organisation. Italian Paolo Dieci, a founder of an aid group that works with Unicef in Africa, was also reported as among the dead. Three members of humanitarian organisation Africa Tremila, based in Bergamo, Italy, were on board. The aid group's president Carlo Spini, his wife Gabriella Viggiani, and treasurer Matteo Ravasio were among the eight Italians killed. Sicilian regional culture ministry assessor Sebastiano Tusa, an underwater archaeologist, was also reportedly on the plane. Also among those killed from the WFP were Virginia Chimenti and Maria Pilar Buzzetti. Cedric Asiavugwa, a 32-year-old law student at Georgetown University in Washington was travelling to Nairobi, his home town, following a family bereavement, college officials told the Washington Post. The African Diaspora Youth Forum in Europe said co-chairman Karim Saafi had been a passenger on the flight and had been due to represent them at a meeting with the African Union in Nairobi. Professor Pius Adesamni was named as a victim by Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. Hussein Swaleh, the former secretary general of the Football Kenya Federation, was named as being among the dead by Sofapaka Football Club. Abiodun Oluremi Bashua – a retired envoy who served in Iran, Austria and Ivory Coast – was killed, Nigeria's foreign affairs ministry said. Austrian media reported that three doctors who were aged between 30 and 40 and worked at hospitals in Linz had died. Save the Children said its child protection in emergencies adviser Tamirat Mulu Demessie was among the dead. Three of the Russians on board were tourists Yekaterina Polyakova, Alexander Polyakov and Sergei Vyalikov, the Russian Embassy in Ethiopia said. The first two were reportedly married. Max Thabiso Edkins, who studied at Oxford University, has been confirmed by his employer, The World Bank, as one of the victims. He spent his life working on climate change projects and was en route to the One Planet Summit in Nairobi on the plane that crashed. He was born in Lesotho and grew up between Lesotho, Germany and South Africa.   Canadian Danielle Moore, 24, was travelling to a UN environment conference in Nairobi. She was an expert in marine biology, working as a member of the clean ocean advocacy group Ocean Wise and as an education lead at the charity Canada Learning Code. Karoline Aadland, 28, from Norway, was a programme finance co-ordinator for the Norwegian Red Cross. "Our thoughts are with her next of kin. Our focus is on providing them with assistance in this difficult time," the Norwegian Red Cross tweeted. The Addis Ababa office for Catholic Relief Services lost four senior Ethio­pian staffers who were traveling to Nairobi for a training program. They were identified as Sara Chalachew, Getnet Alemayehu, Sintayehu Aymeku and Mulusew Alem. Susan Abu Faraj and Asmat Arnasa, from Egypt, were interpreters for the African Union who had been flying to attend the U.N. conference in Nairobi.  Indian citizen Shikha Garg, a consultant with India’s Environment Ministry working with the U.N. Development Program, also died in the crash while travelling to the conference.



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British MPs set to vote on no-deal Brexit

British MPs set to vote on no-deal BrexitBritish MPs will vote Wednesday on whether the country should leave the EU without a deal in just over two weeks, after overwhelmingly rejecting a draft divorce agreement. The House of Commons is expected to vote against a “no deal” Brexit, although this could still happen on March 29 unless it can agree on what should happen instead. MPs on Tuesday rejected for a second time the withdrawal deal negotiated by Prime Minister Theresa May, despite her obtaining last-minute assurances from EU officials.



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First British victims identified among 157 killed in Ethiopian Airlines crash as airlines ground Boeing 737 Max-8

First British victims identified among 157 killed in Ethiopian Airlines crash as airlines ground Boeing 737 Max-8A grieving father said on Sunday he had “never wanted” his “soft and loving” daughter to be on a plane that crashed in Ethiopia, killing all 157 passengers and crew onboard. Joanna Toole was one of seven Britons who perished when a Boeing 737 Max-8 jet, which was only months old, crashed just six minutes after take off. The US aircraft giant launched an investigation amid growing concern over the passenger jet’s design. The same model had crashed in Indonesia less than five months ago, killing all 189 people onboard. The cause of Sunday's crash is still unclear but the pilot of Ethiopia airlines flight ET302 reported difficulties shortly after taking off from Addis Ababa en route to the Kenyan capital Nairobi. It has also emerged that the US Department of State had released a security alert on March 8, advising all US government travellers “not to arrive or depart [Addis Ababa’s] Bole International Airport on March 10” although this advice was rescinded a day later.  The family of Joanna Toole, who grew up in Exmouth, have been informed that she was on board an Ethiopia Airlines plane which crashed shortly after take off en route to Nairobi in Kenya. Ms Toole, 36, from Exmouth in Devon, was due to attend the United Nations Environment Assembly starting in Nairobi. She was, her father said, a committed environmentalist and animal lover who worked for the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organisation. “Joanna was a very soft and loving person,” said her father Adrian Toole, speaking to DevonLive website. “She had never really wanted to do anything else but work in animal welfare since she was a child. “Somehow that work took her into the international sphere… That involves a lot of travelling around the world – although personally I never wanted her to be on a single one of those planes… Up until now she had been lucky.” Ms Toole’s partner, who lived with her in Rome, had telephoned her father to inform him she was on the flight while her employers described her as “a wonderful human being”. China 'grounds Boeing 737 Max jets' The crash raises serious questions over the design of the Boeing aircraft and in particular its anti-stall mechanism. Within the first few minutes after take-off the plane’s vertical speed, the rate of climb or descent, varied dramatically. Its ‘unstable’ vertical speed, according to data from the flight-tracking website flightradar24, went from 2,624 feet per minute to -1216, suggesting the plane rose and fell rapidly in the minutes before it plunged into scrubland. Vertical speed should remain stable – or else increase – after take off. As the aviation industry reeled from the latest tragedy, China's aviation regulator has ordered domestic airlines to suspend their Boeing 737 Max aircraft. The Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC) said local carriers had until 6 pm local time to ground the 96 jets of that model that they operate. Ceremony marking 1st delivery of Boeing 737 Max 8 airplane to Air China in Zhoushan Credit: Reuters The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) had issued an Emergency Airworthiness Directive in November last year, in relation to one of the flight systems on the Boeing 737-8 and 737-9 series of aircraft. That was published following the crash of the Lion Air flight 610 – another Boeing 737 Max 8 – on October 29.  The FAA directive warned that an "angle of attack" censor, which is supposed to help to prevent a plane from stalling, could lead to an “excessive nose-down attitude, significant altitude loss, and possible impact with the terrain”. This “unsafe condition… is likely to exist or develop” in the Boeing 737-8 and 737-9 designs, the directive concluded.  Ethiopia plane crash Photographs from the scene showed the devastation caused by the crash with harrowing images of body parts covered up by plastic bodybags scattered in the wake of the crash at 8.44am local time.  Boeing announced it would send a technical assistance team to the site of the crash. It said it is postponing the “external debut” of its 777X model and related media events scheduled for this week because of the accident. There is no change to the plane’s schedule or progress, Boeing said. French-British woman among the victims Kenya’s transport secretary James Macharia told reporters there were nationals from at least 35 different countries on board, including the seven British passengers. It is thought to be the biggest loss of life of Britons in a passenger jet crash since the shooting down of MH-17 over Ukraine in 2014. A French-British polar tourism expert has been named in Norwegian media as one of those to have died in the crash. Sarah Auffret was an environmental agent for the Association of Arctic Expedition Cruise Operators. "Words cannot describe the sorrow and despair we feel. We have lost a true friend and beloved colleague," a statement from the Norwegian firm said. Among the 32 Kenyans who lost their lives was Joseph Kuria Waithaka, 55, who had lived in Hull for more than a decade working for the probation service and was travelling back to the region after visiting his wife and children, who still live in the UK. Joseph Waithaka has been identified by the WFP as a victim of the Ethiopian Airlines flight ET302 His son Ben Kuria said: “My dad was a private man but he also had a pastoral heart. He really championed people… he really rooted for his children.” His daughter Zipporah Kuria tweeted that her father “was the first man I ever loved. Believed in my dreams more than I ever could. Rest in peace daddy.” There were also eight Americans and 18 Canadians among the dead. Theresa May said she was “deeply saddened to hear of the devastating loss of life following the plane crash in Ethiopia”.  In a statement, the prime minister said: “At this very difficult time my thoughts are with the families and friends of the British citizens on board and all those affected by this tragic incident.” As many as 50 people onboard were thought to be heading for the same UN conference. The UN confirmed a number of its staff had died while the World Food Programme said it was "mourning" the loss of its employees. Those included the one Irish victim who was named as Michael Ryan. Among those killed were the wife and two children of the Slovakian MP Anton Hrnko while hospitality company Tamarind Group said its chief executive Jonathan Seex, a Kenyan national, also died.  Lucky escape A Greek man said he would have been the 150th passenger on the plane, except he arrived two minutes late for the flight. "I was mad because nobody helped me to reach the gate on time," Antonis Mavropoulos said in a Facebook post entitled "My lucky day" in which he includes a photo of his ticket. Mavropoulos, president of the International Solid Waste Association, a non-profit organisation, was travelling to Nairobi to attend the annual assembly of the UN Environment Programme, according to Athens News Agency. Members of the search and rescue mission carry dead bodies at the scene of the Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET 302 plane crash, near the town of Bishoftu Credit: Reuters He was supposed to board the plane but he reached the departure gate just two minutes after it was closed. He booked a later flight but was then prevented from boarding by airport staff. "They led me to the police station of the airport. The officer told me not to protest but to pray to God because I was the only passenger that didn't board the ET 302 flight that was lost," Mavropoulos said in his post in which he admits being in shock. The airport authorities explained that they wanted to question him because he was the only passenger booked onto the doomed flight who wasn't on board. "They said they couldn't let me go before cross-checking my identity, the reason I hadn't boarded the plane etc." Ethiopian Airlines CEO, Tewolde Medhin, visited the scene of the crash where emergency worker Lenora Ayana told The Telegraph that officials were “having a hard time locating bodies with so much debris.”  'Everything is burnt down' The plane had taken off at 8:38am (0638 GMT) from Bole International Airport but lost contact six minutes later near Bishoftu, a town 37 miles southeast of Addis Ababa. The plane came down near the village of Tulu Fara. The pilot had sent out a distress call and was given the all clear to return. A massive crater could be seen at the crash site, with belongings and airplane parts scattered widely. An eyewitness told the BBC there was an intense fire when the plane crashed. “The blast and the fire were so strong that we couldn’t get near it,” he said. “Everything is burnt down.” At Nairobi airport, anxious relatives waited for news, many in tears and in distress. Devastated family members of the victims involved in a plane crash at Addis Ababa international airport  Credit: AP “I am still hoping that all is fine, because I have been waiting for my sister since morning and we have not been told anything,” said Peter Kimani, who was waiting in the arrivals lounge for hours after the plane had been scheduled to land at 10:25am local time. His sister is a nurse who he said had been in the Congo. “We are still expecting our loved one from Addis… we have just received news that there is a plane that has crashed. We can only hope that she is not on that flight.” Ethiopian Airlines confirmed it had bought the plane in November and it had “undergone a rigorous first check maintenance in February 2018.”  A statement from Boeing said the company was “deeply saddened to learn of the passing of the passengers and crew on Ethiopian Airlines flight 302”, adding: “We extend our heartfelt sympathies to the families and loved ones of the passengers and crew on board and stand ready to support the Ethiopian Airlines team.”  Safety experts cautioned against drawing too many comparisons between the two crashes until more is known about Sunday's disaster. Boeing 737 MAX | Who has ordered the plane? The Ethiopian Airlines CEO "stated there were no defects prior to the flight, so it is hard to see any parallels with the Lion Air crash yet," said Harro Ranter, founder of the Aviation Safety Network, which compiles information about accidents worldwide. Ethiopia’s Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed tweeted his “deepest condolences to the families of those that have lost their loved ones”.  Kenya’s President Uhuru Kenyatta said: “My prayers go to all the families and associates of those on board.” A spokesman for António Guterres, UN Secretary General, said: “The Secretary-General was deeply saddened at the tragic loss of lives in the airplane crash.  “He conveys his heartfelt sympathies and solidarity to the victims’ families and loved ones.” The crash came on the eve of a major, annual assembly of the UN Environment Programme opening in Nairobi. Rescue teams work at the site of the crashed plane, watched by hundreds of bystanders  Credit: EWELDE Source:  What do we know about the airline? The last major accident involving an Ethiopian Airlines passenger plane was a Boeing 737-800 that exploded after taking off from Lebanon in 2010, killing 83 passengers and seven crew. The state-owned Ethiopian Airlines, widely considered the best-managed airline in Africa, calls itself the Continent's largest carrier and has ambitions of becoming the gateway to Africa. It has been expanding assertively, recently opening a route to Moscow and in January inaugurating a new passenger terminal in Addis Ababa to triple capacity. Speaking at the inauguration, the Prime Minister Ahmed challenged the airline to build a new "Airport City" terminal in Bishoftu – where Sunday's crash occurred. Read more: The world's safest – and least safe – airlines for 2019 Sign up for your essential, twice-daily briefing from The Telegraph with our free Front Page newsletter.



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British IS runaway teen's baby son dies in Syria

British IS runaway teen's baby son dies in SyriaThe British government drew fresh criticism Saturday over its decision to revoke citizenship from a London teenager who joined the Islamic State group in Syria, after her baby died in a refugee camp. Shamima Begum, 19, had asked to return home after giving birth to her son Jarrah last month in the camp in northeastern Syria, but London refused. A spokesman for the US-backed Syrian Democratic Forces, Mustefa Bali, told AFP the baby had died, without giving further details.



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Two more Isil brides stripped of British citizenship

Two more Isil brides stripped of British citizenshipTwo more jihadi brides who joined Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant are believed to have been stripped of their UK citizenship while living in a refugee camp in Syria. The disclosure came as a row intensified over the death of a three-week-old baby whose mother Shamima Begum had been stripped of her British citizenship. Reema Iqbal, 30, along with her sister Zara Iqbal, 28, are mothers of five children between them, and are also in a camp. Legal sources told the Sunday Times that the sisters have had their citizenship removed after marrying into a terror cell linked to the execution of western hostages. A decision to remove their citizenship will fuel fears over what happens to the children of jihadi brides. The two women left Newham in London in 2013 for the co-called Isil caliphate. At least one of their sons was born in the UK and was taken to Syria. The women's parents are originally from Pakistan, and the Home Office could pursue the argument that they are Pakistani nationals. Last month Reema Iqbal told The Telegraph she was hopeful of returning to the UK. She said: "The security services came to speak to me and I was honest, I told them my whole story so now it’s up to them to judge. I don’t know if my Mum ever got me a Pakistani passport or not, I’ve never been to Pakistan. "There’s not enough food for bigger families. It’s a prison here, but we’re serving no sentence. If I face court, fine, but take me back to the UK, that’s where I’m from.” Sajid Javid, the home secretary, was facing cross-party criticism after Kurdish officials confirmed that the three-week-old baby of Shamima Begum, 19, had died this week. Shamima Begum Credit: MetropolitanPpolice Diane Abbott, the shadow home secretary, blamed Mr Javid’s decision to remove Ms Begum’s citizenship for the child’s death, accusing him of breaking international law and condemning the decision as “callous and inhumane”. Phillip Lee, a Tory MP said the decision had been driven by populism and that the British government had failed in its moral responsibility to both mother and child.  “I was just troubled by the decision. It seemed driven by a sort of populism, not any principle I recognise,” he told the BBC’s Today programme. The news of the death came as Ms Begum’s father Ahmed Ali offered an apology to the British public for his daughter's decision to flee the country and join the terror group. Speaking from his home in the village of Dovroy, in north-eastern Bangladesh, he told the BBC: "She has done wrong, I apologise to everyone as her father, to the British people, I am sorry for Shamima's doing. I request to the British people, please forgive her." Mr Ali said added he only visited London three or four months at a time and had no idea how his daughter had become radicalised.  He urged the British government and public to "take her back and punish her if she had done any mistake".



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The Morgan Plus Six Looks Familiar, in a Reassuring British Sort of Way

The Morgan Plus Six Looks Familiar, in a Reassuring British Sort of WayIt's an all-new car, with modern conveniences including the first turbocharged engine on a Morgan and even a small digital screen on the dash.



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Iran says British Hezbollah ban 'irresponsible'

Iran says British Hezbollah ban 'irresponsible'Britain said Monday it would seek to make membership of the Shiite movement or inviting support for it a crime. The decision followed outrage over the display of the Hezbollah flag, which features a Kalashnikov assault rifle, at pro-Palestinian demonstrations in London. “Iran considers Hezbollah a legitimate and legal force which plays an effective and undeniable role in helping its country’s political stability and safeguarding its security,” the foreign ministry said on its website.



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British Steel May Face $130 Million Hit From Brexit Carbon Hitch

British Steel May Face $  130 Million Hit From Brexit Carbon HitchThe costs relate to the private equity-owned steelmaker’s carbon pollution bill for 2018, which is due by March 15, according to the people, who declined to be identified discussing a commercially sensitive matter. British Steel is the most prominent name on an official analysis detailing U.K. companies affected by a European Union decision to freeze the allocation of free carbon permits that can be used to comply with the rules. The steelmaker’s financial headache highlights the difficulties that Brexit uncertainty is causing British industry.



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Shamima Begum: Being stripped of my British citizenship is hard to swallow and unjust

Shamima Begum: Being stripped of my British citizenship is hard to swallow and unjustShamima Begum, the Isil bride, has described being stripped of her British citizenship is "unjust" and "hard to swallow" after she was shown the Home Office's documentation of the decision.  The 19-year-old, who had expressed the desire to return to the UK with her newborn son, was banned on Tuesday from entering the country. At a refugee camp in northeastern Syria, she was shown the Government's letter, showing that she is no longer a British national.  "I don't know what to say," she told ITV News. "I am not that shocked but I am a bit shocked. It’s a bit upsetting and frustrating. I feel like it’s a bit unjust on me and my son." She added: "It’s kind of heart-breaking to read. My family made it sound like it would be a lot easier for me to come back to the UK when I was speaking to them in Baghouz. It’s kind of hard to swallow." Isil bride Shamima Begum | Read more Begum claimed that she was being treated harshly because "I was on the news four years ago", saying that she heard of "other people being sent back to Britain".  "I don't know why my case is any different," she added.  International law forbids nations from making people stateless by revoking their only citizenship, prompting speculation that Begum held dual citizenship through her Bangladeshi parents. But on Wednesday morning, Begum's lawyer Tasnime Akunjee said his client does not have dual nationality.  While her family have said they are "considering all legal avenues to challenge this decision", Begum said she may explore a potential citizenship route through her Dutch husband. "Another option I might try with my family is my husband is from Holland and he has family in Holland," she said. "Maybe I can ask for citizenship in Holland. If he gets sent back to prison in Holland I can just wait for him while he is in prison." She married Isil fighter Yago Riedjik in Syria having travelled to the Middle East from Bethnal Green in east London in 2014. Begum have birth to their third child on Sunday. Her two other children died in Syria.  Shamima Begum's Dutch-born husband Yago Riedjik In a letter sent to her family in Bethnal Green, east London, on Tuesday, officials said the Home Secretary, Sajid Javid, had made the decision in "light of the circumstances". The letter read: "Please find enclosed papers that relate to a decision taken by the Home Secretary, to deprive your daughter, Shamima Begum, of her British citizenship. "In light of the circumstances of your daughter, the notice of the Home Secretary's decision has been served of file today (19th February), and the order removing her British citizenship has subsequently been made." The letter went on to urge Ms Begum's family to make the teenager aware of the decision, but added that she had a right to appeal. Isil schoolgirls' journey into Syria In a statement the family's lawyer said they were very disappointed by the move. Despite saying she wants to bring her baby son up in the peace and security of the UK, Begum has insisted she has no regrets about travelling to Syria. She has also been criticised for likening the deaths of 22 people in the Manchester Arena terror attack to the civilians being bombed in Isil territory. Begum defends Manchester Arena bombing The teenager, who gave birth to a baby boy on the weekend, appeared to defend the Manchester Arena bombing as tit-for-tat retaliation for air strikes in Syria.  In an interview with the BBC, she said the deaths of 22 innocent people in the terrorist attack at an Ariana Grande concert in 2017 were akin to the "women and children" being bombed in Isil territory in Baghuz. She told the broadcaster: "I do feel that it's wrong that innocent people did get killed. It's one thing to kill a soldier that is fighting you, it's self-defence, but to kill the people like women and children… "Just people like the women and children in Baghuz that are being killed right now unjustly, the bombings. It's a two-way thing really. "Because women and children are being killed back in the Islamic State right now and it's kind of retaliation. Like, their justification was that it was retaliation so I thought 'OK, that is a fair justification'." She was partly inspired by videos of fighters beheading hostages and partly by other propaganda films showing the "good life" IS could offer. 'Show me some sympathy', says Isil bride after giving birth The British schoolgirl who ran away to join Isil appealed for public sympathy following the birth of her son on Sunday. In an interview with Sky News recorded at the Kurdish-controlled camp to which she fled from the last pocket of Isil-controlled territory, Begum said there was "no evidence" she had done anything wrong and she could not see "any reason" why her child should be taken from her when she had simply been living as a housewife. Speaking just hours after giving birth, her baby at her side, she said she had no regrets about fleeing the family home in Bethnal Green, east London, to support Isil, claiming the experience had made her "stronger, tougher". She said she could see a future for herself and her son, whom she has named Jarah after one of the two children she lost to malnutrition and disease in the last three months, "if the UK are willing to take me back and help me start a new life again and try and move on from everything that’s happened in the last four years". She added: "I wouldn’t have found someone like my husband [Yago Riedijk, 26, a Muslim convert from the Netherlands] in the UK. I had my kids, I had a good time there." Her other children, Jarah and Surayah, a daughter, died aged 18 months and nine months. Asked how she felt about the debate over whether she should be allowed to return home, Begum said: "I feel a lot of people should have sympathy for me, for everything I’ve been through. "I didn’t know what I was getting into when I left, I just was hoping that maybe for the sake of me and my child they let me come back.  "I can’t live in this camp forever. It’s not really possible." In the interview, Begum apologised for the first time to her family for running away, and said that though she knew it was "like a big slap in the face" for her to ask after she had previously rejected their calls for her to return, "I really need their help".   Begum was 'OK' with Isil beheadings   The Isil bride said last week she was attracted to Isil by videos that she had seen online, which she said showed "how they’ll take care of you". She said she knew that the group carried out beheadings, but that she "was OK with it at first. I started becoming religious just before I left and from what I heard Islamically that is all allowed". "At first it was nice," she said of life in the so-called Islamic State. "It was how they showed it in the videos, you know, you come, make a family together, but then things got harder.  "We had to keep moving and moving and moving. The situation got fraught." Begum acknowledged that it would be "really hard" to be rehabilitated after everything she had been through.   "I’m still in that mentality of planes over my head, emergency backpacks, starving… it would be a big shock to go back to the UK and start again," she said. READ MORE: Allison Pearson: Thank God, Sajid Javid grasped Shamima Begum is the one person uniting Britain – against her READ MORE: Allison Pearson:  Sorry my heartless little jihadi bride, but you made your bed and now you can lie in it



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American and British ISIS brides Hoda Muthana and Shamima Begum plead to go home

American and British ISIS brides Hoda Muthana and Shamima Begum plead to go homeHoda Muthana and Shamima Begum fled to Syria to marry Islamic State group fighters. Now they want to come home.



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